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Series Wrapup

Story

With the Dead-ball Era in full swing by 1905, only three American League players – Elmer Flick, Wee Willie Keeler, and Harry Bay – compiled a batting average over .300.  Flick topped the junior circuit with a mark of .308, giving him the lowest batting average of any batting champion in either league until Carl Yastrzemski led the A.L. with a .301 average in 1968.  The entire American League batted only .241, and the circuit’s top run-scoring team, Philadelphia, scored only 623 runs and batted just .255.

It should come as no surprise that pitchers excelled during this deadest of Dead-ball years.  Every club posted a team ERA under 3.00.  Philadelphia’s Rube Waddell led a plethora of A.L. hurlers that allowed the opposition fewer than two earned runs per-game, winning the ERA title with a mark of 1.48.  In fact, three of the league’s top pitchers were members of the starting rotation for the pennant-winning Athletics, who finished the season with a record of 92-56, to edge out the second-place Chicago White Sox by only two games.  Chief Bender and Eddie Plank joined Waddell on Connie Mack’s staff, giving the A’s an extremely formidable “Big Three” at the top of their rotation.  Bender finished the year with a record of 18-11 and a 2.83 ERA.  Plank went 24-12, with an ERA of 2.26 and 210 strikeouts.  In addition to leading the league with a 1.48 ERA, Waddell topped the circuit with 27 victories and 287 strikeouts.  He also pitched 44 consecutive scoreless innings down the stretch in September.

The Athletics also featured a versatile offense that included Harry Davis, who led the American League with 92 runs scored, 83 runs batted in, and 47 doubles, Lave Cross, who drove in 77 runs, and Topsy Hartsel, who topped the junior circuit with 121 bases on balls.

Philadelphia subsequently played the New York Giants in the World Series, losing to John McGraw’s squad in just five games.  New York took the Fall Classic rather handily, outscoring the A’s by a combined margin of 15-3.  Each game resulted in a shutout, with New York’s Christy Mathewson keeping Philadelphia off the scoreboard in each of his three starts.  Rube Waddell failed to make an appearance in the Series, sitting out the Fall Classic after injuring himself on the eve of the regular season finale in a bit of horseplay with teammate Andy Coakley.

Other notable events from the 1905 American League campaign follow:

Ty Cobb made his major league debut with the Detroit Tigers.

• The Chicago White Sox established an American League record by posting a 1.99 team ERA and surrendering only 451 runs to the opposition.

Nap Lajoie became Cleveland's player/manager, with the team taking on the name of the "Naps" in his honor.  Yet Lajoie sat out much of the season after nearly dying of blood poisoning as the result of a spike wound.

Cy Young typified the plight of Dead-ball hurlers by finishing the campaign with a record of 18-19 despite compiling a 1.82 ERA.

• The Boston Americans established a major league record that still stands by using only 18 players all year.

• In an all-time classic pitcher’s duel, Rube Waddell defeated Cy Young in a 20-inning game on July 4.

• Weldon Henley of the A's threw a no-hitter against the Browns on July 22.

• Frank Smith of the White Sox tossed a no-hitter versus Detroit on Sept. 6.

Bill Dinneen of Boston threw a no-hitter against the White Sox on Sept. 27.

• Browns hurler Harry Howell established an all-time record for pitchers by averaging 4.68 assists per game.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1478 5049 578 1179 488 .184 165 69 29 131 1569 .297 .230 .546 139
CHA 1520 5114 614 1213 487 .215 200 55 11 194 1556 .306 .274 .580 241
CLE 1460 5166 562 1318 482 .204 211 72 18 188 0 1727 .270 .257 .537 148
DET 1454 4971 511 1209 421 .212 190 54 13 129 0 1546 .311 .274 .595 0 0 180
NYA 1525 4957 588 1228 480 .198 163 61 23 200 0 1582 .301 .252 .579 0 0 151
PHA 1468 5146 623 1310 511 .213 256 51 24 190 0 1740 .284 .271 .570 165
SLA 1491 5207 511 1207 415 .177 153 49 16 131 1506 .277 .214 .521 150
WS1 1481 5015 560 1121 483 .185 193 68 22 169 1516 .257 .242 .500 161

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 183 78 74 1357 652 292 1433 1198 33 27.740 428 564 124 14 1 25 1
CHA 190 92 60 1428 613 329 556 1163 11 11.870 315 450 131 15 0 39 0
CLE 170 76 78 1364 555 334 1174 1251 23 37.830 431 587 140 16 0 32 0
DET 185 79 74 1348 578 474 2896 1226 11 76.330 424 608 124 17 1 19 1
NYA 228 71 78 1353 642 396 2233 1235 26 113.220 440 622 88 16 4 46 1
PHA 189 92 56 1384 895 409 2712 1137 21 18.940 337 492 117 19 0 40 4
SLA 178 54 99 1385 633 389 2351 1245 19 23.070 421 608 134 10 2 41 0
WS1 194 64 87 1362 539 385 0 1250 12 28.680 434 623 118 12 1 32 1

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1431 6298 4088 1914 296 .935 0 0 0 0 26
CHA 1488 6700 4249 2234 217 .961 0 0 0 0 19
CLE 1433 6314 4118 1963 233 .950 0 0 0 0 24
DET 1440 6142 4013 1862 267 .939 0 0 0 0 19
NYA 1483 6109 4047 1769 293 .936 0 0 0 0 23
PHA 1434 6141 4119 1757 265 .938 0 0 0 0 21
SLA 1449 6612 4135 2182 295 .946 0 0 0 0 20
WS1 1442 6435 4076 2040 319 .934 0 0 0 0 11

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1905 World Series, American League, Andy Coakley, Bill Dinneen, Chief Bender, Christy Mathewson, Connie Mack, Cy Young, Eddie Plank, Elmer Flick, Frank Smith, Harry Bay, Harry Davis, Harry Howell, John McGraw, Lave Cross, Nap Lajoie, Philadelphia Athletics, Rube Waddell, Topsy Hartsel, Ty Cobb, Weldon Henley, Willie Keeler

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