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Series Wrapup

Story

With both leagues using a livelier, cork-centered ball throughout the 1911 campaign, pitchers struggled to reach the level of dominance they attained throughout much of the Dead-ball Era.  Batting averages and runs scored totals soared in both major leagues, as the National League batted a composite .260, while the A.L. posted an overall mark of .273.  The figure in the junior circuit represented a jump of more than 30 points from the previous season.  Two American League clubs, Philadelphia and Detroit, compiled a team batting average in excess of .290.   

The tandem of Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford gave the Tigers an extremely potent offense, as Detroit finished a close second in the junior circuit with 831 runs scored.  Crawford placed among the league leaders in virtually every major offensive category, including runs batted in (115), runs scored (109), batting average (.378), triples (14), and hits (217).  Meanwhile, Cobb topped the circuit in nine different offensive categories.  He led the league with a .420 batting average, 127 runs batted in, 147 runs scored, 248 hits, 47 doubles, 24 triples, 83 stolen bases, a .621 slugging percentage, and 367 total bases.  Cobb’s extraordinary performance enabled him to capture the Chalmers Award, which was presented annually from 1911 to 1914 to the player in each league who "should prove himself as the most important and useful player to his club and to the league at large in point of deportment and value of services rendered."

Unfortunately for Cobb, the Tigers had little in the way of pitching, relegating them to a distant second-place finish in the American League, 13 ½ games behind the first-place Philadelphia Athletics.  An extremely well-balanced club, the A’s captured their second consecutive pennant by finishing the year with a record of 101-50.  Philadelphia led the A.L. with 861 runs scored and a .296 team batting average, while also surrendering a league-low 602 runs to the opposition.    

The duo of Eddie Collins and Frank “Home Run” Baker led the A’s on offense.  In addition to playing a brilliant second base, Collins batted .365, knocked in 73 runs, and scored 92 others.  Baker batted .334, drove in 115 runs, scored 96 others, and topped the circuit with 11 home runs.  Chief Bender, Eddie Plank, and Jack Coombs headed the A’s pitching staff.  Bender finished 17-5 with a 2.16 ERA.  Plank finished 23-8, with a 2.10 ERA, 24 complete games, and a league-leading six shutouts.  Coombs followed up his brilliant 1910 campaign by leading the A.L. in victories for the second straight year with a record of 28-12.  

The A’s continued their dominance against the New York Giants in the World Series, winning the Fall Classic in six games and outscoring their opponents by a combined margin of 27-13.  Philadelphia’s pitching staff held New York’s lineup to just 33 hits and a .175 batting average in the six contests.  Christy Mathewson won only one of his three starts, and Frank Baker earned his nickname “Home Run” by deciding two close games with late-inning homers.  Baker finished the Series with a .375 batting average, and he led both teams with five runs batted in, seven runs scored, and two home runs.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• Ty Cobb established a new American League record by hitting in 40 consecutive games.

Walter Johnson won 25 games for seventh-place Washington and led the American League with 36 complete games.

• Chicago's Ed Walsh finished second in the league with 27 victories, compiled a 2.22 ERA, and topped the circuit with 255 strikeouts, 368 innings pitched, and 56 appearances.

• In his first full major league season, Cleveland outfielder Shoeless Joe Jackson finished second in the league to Ty Cobb with a .408 batting average, 126 runs scored, and 233 hits.  His .408 average remains the highest single-season mark ever posted by a first-year player.

•Cleveland rookie Vean Gregg won 23 games and led all A.L. hurlers with a 1.80 ERA.

• Ty Cobb's 367 total bases were the most by any player during the Dead-ball Era.

• Both leagues adopted the dual-umpire system for every game.

Smokey Joe Wood of the Red Sox threw a no-hitter against St. Louis on July 29.

• Ed Walsh of Chicago tossed a no-hitter against the Red Sox on August 27.

Addie Joss passed away from meningitis, provoking an outpouring of grief all over the baseball world.  A 160-97 lifetime pitcher over nine seasons with perennial contender Cleveland, the popular Joss posted a 1.89 career ERA, the second-lowest in history.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1600 5014 680 1379 559 .214 203 66 35 190 0 1819 .337 .281 .641 0 0 213
CHA 1667 5213 718 1401 593 .215 179 92 20 201 1824 .329 .270 .608 208
CLE 1640 5321 691 1501 579 .218 238 81 20 209 1961 .292 .271 .571 160
DET 1602 5294 831 1544 657 .235 230 96 30 276 2056 .347 .301 .671 181
NYA 1594 5052 684 1374 577 .209 190 96 25 269 1831 .325 .265 .607 183
PHA 1570 5199 861 1540 692 .223 237 93 35 226 0 2068 .360 .279 .684 0 0 232
SLA 1570 4996 566 1192 473 .201 187 63 17 125 1556 .352 .243 .640 142
WS1 1579 5065 624 1308 493 .224 159 54 16 215 1623 .301 .293 .606 150

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 238 78 75 1352 711 473 5510 1309 21 67.260 412 642 87 10 8 33 2
CHA 257 77 74 1388 752 384 5735 1349 22 33.620 457 620 85 16 11 35 5
CLE 230 80 73 1390 675 552 5772 1382 17 68.840 519 709 93 6 6 55 8
DET 221 89 65 1386 538 460 5930 1514 28 46.620 575 777 108 8 3 40 1
NYA 232 76 76 1362 667 406 5698 1404 26 49.990 535 726 91 5 3 29 2
PHA 229 101 50 1377 739 487 5672 1343 17 77.280 460 596 97 12 13 34 4
SLA 232 45 107 1332 383 463 5791 1465 28 107.600 571 807 92 8 1 30 4
WS1 216 64 90 1353 628 410 5800 1471 39 54.480 529 765 106 13 3 57 1

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1510 6348 4047 1979 322 .908 0 0 0 0 28
CHA 1566 6499 4153 2091 255 .925 0 0 0 0 25
CLE 1536 6554 4168 2084 302 .947 0 0 0 0 32
DET 1516 6527 4145 2064 318 .942 0 0 0 0 15
NYA 1525 6394 4093 1974 327 .924 0 0 0 0 24
PHA 1511 6245 4121 1896 228 .964 0 0 0 0 14
SLA 1485 6468 3988 2122 358 .939 0 0 0 0 20
WS1 1490 6510 4047 2157 306 .914 0 0 0 0 39

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1911 World Series, Addie Joss, American League, Chief Bender, Christy Mathewson, Ed Walsh, Eddie Collins, Eddie Plank, Frank Baker, Jack Coombs, Joe Jackson, Joe Wood, New York Giants, Philadelphia Athletics, Sam Crawford, Ty Cobb, Vean Gregg, Walter Johnson

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