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Series Wrapup

Story

Although the cork-centered baseball introduced two years earlier remained in use throughout the 1913 campaign, major league pitchers began to regain their mastery over hitters.  Relying more heavily than ever before on trick pitches such as the spitball, hurlers in both leagues excelled to such an extent that the total number of runs scored decreased by more than 1,000.  

The most dominant of these pitchers was Washington’s Walter Johnson, who led the Senators to a second-place finish in the American League by compiling one of the greatest seasons in the history of the junior circuit.  The “Big Train” led A.L. pitchers in every major statistical category, finishing first in the league with a record of 36-7, a 1.14 ERA, 243 strikeouts, 346 innings pitched, 29 complete games, and 11 shutouts, en route to capturing Chalmers Award honors.  At one point during the season, Johnson established a new major league record that stood for more than half a century by throwing 55 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings.  Johnson pitched so brilliantly that the Senators played .837 ball with him on the mound.  Without him, they posted a winning percentage of just .486.

In spite of Johnson’s efforts, the Philadelphia Athletics finished 6 ½ games in front of the Senators in the American League, capturing their third pennant in four years by compiling a record of 96-57.  Eddie Collins and Frank “Home Run” Baker were the driving forces behind Philadelphia’s first-place finish.  Collins batted .345, scored a league-leading 125 runs, collected 184 hits, and stole 55 bases.  Baker led the league with 12 home runs and 117 runs batted in, finished second to Collins with 116 runs scored, batted .337, and collected 190 hits.

The A’s subsequently faced the New York Giants in the World Series for the second time in three years, defeating their National League counterparts once again, this time in five games.  Collins, Baker, and catcher Wally Schang were the hitting stars for Philadelphia.  Collins scored five runs and collected eight hits in 19 times at-bats, for a batting average of .421.  Baker homered once, knocked in seven runs, and went 9-for-20, for a .450 batting average.  Schang also homered once and drove in seven runs, while posting a batting average of .357.  Meanwhile, the A’s pitching staff held New York’s lineup to a team batting average of just .201 during the Fall Classic.   

Led by Shoeless Joe Jackson, the Cleveland Naps finished third in the American League, 9 ½ games behind the Athletics.  Although he hit only seven home runs and knocked in just 71 runs, Jackson led the league with 226 hits and 26 triples, placed second with a .373 batting average, and finished third with 109 runs scored.  Jackson’s outstanding performance earned him a second-place finish in the Chalmers voting.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

Burt Shotton of the St. Louis Browns scored a major league record 19.9 percent of his team's runs.

• The Browns named Branch Rickey their new manager.

Ty Cobb captured his sixth batting title in seven years by topping the circuit with a mark of .390.

• The Federal League began rumblings that it would become a third major league by the 1914 season.

• On November 2, George Stovall, former St. Louis Browns player-manager, became the first major leaguer to jump to the outlaw Federal League when he signed a contract to manage the Kansas City Packers.

• Idled by a sore arm, Smokey Joe Wood won only 11 games for the Red Sox.

• With a batting average of .335, Nap Lajoie surpassed the .300 mark for the final time in his career.

• The New York Highlanders signed a deal to play their home games in the Polo Grounds.  They subsequently renamed themselves the “Yankees.”

• The Yankees hired former Chicago Cubs player-manager Frank Chance to be their manager.

• Chicago’s Ed Cicotte, Reb Russell, and Jim Scott finished second, third, and fourth in the American League in earned run average.

• Philadelphia’s Chief Bender established a new American League record by saving 13 games.

• Third-year pitcher Vean Gregg of Cleveland won 20 games for the third straight year.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1594 4969 630 1334 531 .217 220 101 17 189 0 1807 .313 .281 .606 0 0 167
CHA 1663 4822 486 1139 410 .214 157 66 24 156 0 1500 .341 .268 .646 0 0 193
CLE 1651 5031 632 1349 527 .220 206 74 16 191 0 1751 .326 .299 .681 0 0 208
DET 1662 5064 624 1344 519 .203 180 101 24 218 0 1798 .338 .261 .636 0 0 163
NYA 1644 4880 529 1157 430 .206 155 45 8 203 1426 .340 .255 .621 143
PHA 1667 5044 794 1412 660 .198 223 80 33 221 1894 .320 .273 .619 173
SLA 1655 5031 528 1193 422 .193 179 73 18 209 0 1572 .356 .238 .615 0 0 141
WS1 1689 5074 596 1281 484 .218 156 81 19 287 0 1656 .341 .302 .707 0 0 114

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 246 79 71 1358 710 442 5527 1323 6 65.470 444 609 83 12 10 30 3
CHA 251 78 74 1361 602 438 5464 1190 10 71.120 352 492 84 17 8 30 5
CLE 245 86 66 1388 689 502 5792 1278 19 69.120 392 537 93 18 5 41 5
DET 240 66 87 1360 468 504 5663 1359 13 108.120 511 716 90 4 7 46 0
NYA 252 57 94 1343 530 455 5693 1318 31 52.860 489 669 75 7 7 28 0
PHA 277 96 57 1351 630 532 5839 1200 24 57.340 479 591 69 15 22 48 3
SLA 215 57 96 1382 476 454 5652 1369 21 45.700 470 643 104 14 5 32 3
WS1 275 90 64 1396 758 465 5781 1177 35 168.800 424 568 78 21 20 37 5

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1505 6138 4054 1846 238 .925 0 0 0 0 23
CHA 1537 6404 4075 2074 255 .941 0 0 0 0 19
CLE 1542 6370 4139 1989 242 .898 0 0 0 0 13
DET 1533 6543 4078 2163 302 .901 0 0 0 0 18
NYA 1539 6388 4045 2051 292 .934 0 0 0 0 31
PHA 1571 6215 4048 1955 212 .946 0 0 0 0 13
SLA 1523 6567 4127 2139 301 .952 0 0 0 0 22
WS1 1595 6533 4194 2076 263 .925 0 0 0 0 22

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1913 World Series, American League, Branch Rickey, Burt Shotton, Chief Bender, Eddie Cicotte, Eddie Collins, Federal League, Frank Baker, Frank Chance, George Stovall, Jim Scott, Joe Jackson, Joe Wood, Nap Lajoie, New York Giants, Philadelphia Athletics, Reb Russell, Ty Cobb, Vean Gregg, Wally Schang, Walter Johnson, Washington Senators

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