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Series Wrapup

Story

After rumblings persisted throughout the previous campaign, baseball launched a third major league in 1914.  Misinterpreting a slump period in attendance for an opportunity to create a league that rivaled the success of the two existing circuits, a group of wealthy industrialists that included bakery magnate Robert Ward and oilman Harry Sinclair formed the short-lived Federal League.  Although the upstart circuit lasted only two seasons, it temporarily lured away from the majors stars such as Mordecai Brown, Eddie Plank, Joe Tinker, Jack Quinn, and the ever-mercenary Hal Chase, causing in the process an increase in salaries in the two more established leagues.

Benny Kauff proved to be the Ty Cobb of the new league, topping all hitters with a .370 batting average, 120 runs scored, 75 stolen bases, and 44 doubles for pennant-winning Indianapolis.  One of the Federal League’s legacies is Wrigley Field, which was originally named for restauranteur Charles Weeghman, who built the ballpark for his Chicago Whales.

Meanwhile, in the American League, the Philadelphia Athletics won their fourth pennant in five years, finishing the regular season with a record of 99-53, 8 ½ games ahead of second-place Boston.  A’s second baseman Eddie Collins earned Chalmers Award honors by leading the league with 122 runs scored, a .344 batting average, and a .452 on-base percentage, while finishing second in the circuit with 58 stolen bases.  He also placed among the leaders in runs batted in, hits, doubles, total bases, and slugging percentage.  

The “Miracle Braves” subsequently swept Philadelphia in the World Series, prompting A’s owner and manager Connie Mack to begin disassembling his team shortly thereafter.  Unwilling to compete with the rival Federal League for the services of his best players, Mack auctioned off his stars, one by one, to the highest bidder.  As a result, the Athletics finished last in the American League in each of the next seven seasons.

Although the A’s captured the pennant in 1914 and Eddie Collins won the Chalmers Award, some of the league’s top performers played for other teams.  Tris Speaker had an exceptional year for second-place Boston, finishing second in the batting race with a mark of .338 and topping the circuit with 193 hits, 46 doubles, 287 total bases, and a .503 slugging percentage.  Ty Cobb won his fourth straight batting title with a mark of .368.  Teammate Sam Crawford led the league with 104 runs batted in and 26 triples, tying in the process the American League’s single-season record for three-baggers.  Walter Johnson compiled an exceptional 1.72 ERA and led all A.L. pitchers with 28 victories, 225 strikeouts, 371 innings pitched, 33 complete games, and nine shutouts.  Boston’s Dutch Leonard went 19-5 and posted the lowest single-season ERA ever – an extraordinary mark of 0.96 that helped the Red Sox compile a league-best 2.35 team ERA.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

Jacob Ruppert and Captain Tillinghast L’Hommedieu Huston purchased the New York Yankees from original owners Frank Farrell and Bill Devery for the sum of $460,000.

Nap Lajoie collected his 3,000th hit.

Babe Ruth made his major league debut as a pitcher with the Boston Red Sox.  He pitched seven innings in his first appearance on July 1, earning a win over Cleveland in the process.

Jim Scott of Chicago threw a no-hitter against Washington on May 14 but lost the contest by a score of 1-0 in 10 innings.

Joe Benz of Chicago tossed a no-hitter against Cleveland on May 31.

• New York’s American League franchise became universally known as the "Yankees."

• Named interim Yankee manager late in the year, 23-year-old shortstop Roger Peckinpaugh became the youngest skipper ever.

• New York's Fritz Maisel established an all-time record for A.L. third basemen by topping the circuit with 74 steals.

• Former Philadelphia Athletics ace left-hander Rube Waddell died at age 37.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1788 5117 589 1278 514 .181 226 85 18 177 176 1728 .306 .232 .573 173
CHA 1708 5040 487 1205 390 .190 161 71 19 167 152 1565 .300 .234 .556 206
CLE 1725 5157 538 1262 438 .164 178 70 10 167 157 1610 .282 .207 .528 0 0 155
DET 1722 5102 615 1318 513 .182 195 84 25 211 154 1756 .304 .241 .576 0 0 206
NYA 1641 4992 535 1144 416 .208 149 52 12 251 191 1433 .486 .272 .776 145
PHA 1622 5126 749 1392 627 .197 165 80 29 231 188 1804 .355 .250 .651 218
SLA 1793 5101 523 1241 430 .160 185 75 17 233 189 1627 .289 .199 .528 146
WS1 1718 5108 572 1245 470 .206 176 81 18 220 163 1637 .366 .284 .722 0 0 178

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 251 91 62 1426 602 393 5545 1207 18 41.890 375 511 88 23 8 21 1
CHA 281 70 84 1397 660 401 5512 1207 15 23.410 385 568 74 16 11 31 0
CLE 286 51 102 1392 688 666 5808 1365 10 56.650 497 708 69 9 3 46 3
DET 274 80 73 1410 567 498 5734 1285 17 43.240 448 618 81 13 12 31 5
NYA 240 70 84 1397 563 390 5524 1277 30 37.870 437 550 98 9 5 37 1
PHA 252 98 53 1404 720 521 5655 1264 18 56.270 433 529 89 22 17 37 1
SLA 272 71 82 1410 553 540 5807 1309 20 39.530 446 614 81 15 11 42 2
WS1 277 81 72 1420 784 520 5630 1170 20 48.240 401 519 75 21 20 46 6

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1648 6459 4273 1944 242 .956 0 0 0 0 19
CHA 1596 6698 4185 2225 288 .936 0 0 0 0 16
CLE 1595 6433 4136 1999 298 .937 0 0 0 0 30
DET 1586 6780 4223 2271 286 .924 0 0 0 0 23
NYA 1535 6487 4184 2065 238 .951 0 0 0 0 15
PHA 1559 6352 4203 1936 213 .931 0 0 0 0 25
SLA 1657 6597 4243 2037 317 .924 0 0 0 0 30
WS1 1612 6456 4251 1953 252 .903 0 0 0 0 22

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1914 World Series, American League, Babe Ruth, Benny Kauff, Bill Devery, Boston Braves, Connie Mack, Dutch Leonard, Eddie Collins, Eddie Plank, Federal League, Frank Baker, Fritz Maisel, Hal Chase, Jack Quinn, Jacob Ruppert, Jim Scott, Joe Benz, Joe Tinker, Mordecai Brown, Nap Lajoie, Philadelphia Athletics, Roger Peckinpaugh, Rube Waddell, Sam Crawford, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson

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