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Series Wrapup

Story

Overcoming the sale of star centerfielder Tris Speaker to Cleveland following a salary dispute, the Boston Red Sox repeated as American League champions in 1916, finishing the campaign two games ahead of second-place Chicago and four games in front of third-place Detroit, with a record of 91-63.  Although Boston’s offense finished just sixth in the A.L. rankings, their superb pitching staff carried them to their second straight pennant.  Babe Ruth became Boston’s most prominent player in Speaker’s absence, establishing himself as arguably the junior circuit’s best pitcher in just his second full season as a starter.  Ruth compiled a record of 23-12, with a league-leading 1.75 earned run average and nine shutouts.  He also struck out 170 batters, threw 323 innings, and completed 23 games.  Ruth headed a pitching staff that also included Dutch Leonard, Rube Foster, and submarine-style power pitcher Carl Mays – a group that led the American League with 24 shutouts.

The Red Sox subsequently faced the Brooklyn Robins in the World Series and, just as they did one year earlier against the Philadelphia Phillies, defeated their National League counterparts in five games.  Posting a team ERA of 1.47 during the Fall Classic, the Red Sox dominated Brooklyn’s lineup, which compiled a team batting average of just .200 against Boston pitching.  Red Sox batters fared little better against Brooklyn pitching, combining to hit just .238.  But they collected their hits at the most propitious moments, en route to outscoring the Robins by a combined margin of 21-13.  Babe Ruth was the star of the Series, winning Game Two by throwing 13 shutout innings as he started a consecutive scoreless innings streak that eventually reached 29 in the 1918 Fall Classic.

Boston’s starting staff was perhaps the deepest in the league, but Chicago White Sox hurlers led the circuit in team ERA.  Ed Cicotte placed second in the league with an ERA of 1.78, while Red Faber also finished among the leaders with a mark of 2.02.

The third-place Tigers had one of the league’s best players in Ty Cobb, who topped the circuit with 113 runs scored and 68 stolen bases.  But Cobb failed to win the batting title for the first time in six years, even though he posted a mark of .371.  Tris Speaker led all A.L. batters in that category, compiling an average of .386 in his first year in Cleveland.  Speaker also topped the circuit with 211 hits, 41 doubles, a .470 on-base percentage, and a .502 slugging percentage.  Meanwhile, Shoeless Joe Jackson had an exceptional year for second-place Chicago, placing among the league leaders with a .341 batting average, 202 hits, 40 doubles, a .393 on-base percentage, and a .495 slugging percentage.  He also led the league with 21 triples.
   
Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• The Philadelphia Athletics and the Detroit Tigers combined to set a major league record by issuing 30 walks during a 16-2 Tiger win on May 9.  A’s pitchers issued a total of 18 walks.  They walked another 11 Tiger batters the following day, for a two-game major league record of 29 free passes.

• Boston Red Sox pitcher Dutch Leonard allowed two runs on two hits, one walk, one hit-batsman, and a wild pitch, before being relieved during the first inning of a game against the St. Louis Browns on August 29.  One day later, Leonard pitched a 4–0 no-hitter versus St. Louis.

• Philadelphia Athletics switch-hitting catcher Wally Schang belted two home runs against the New York Yankees on September 8, to become the first player in major league history to hit home runs from both sides of the plate during a single game.

• St. Louis Browns pitcher George Sisler out-dueled Washington’s Walter Johnson 1-0 on September 17.  The victory turned out to be the last for Sisler, who eventually gained admittance to the Hall of Fame as a first baseman.

• Walter Johnson led all American League pitchers with 25 wins, 36 complete games, and 228 strikeouts.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1872 5018 548 1246 454 .223 197 56 14 129 13 1597 .340 .280 .631 236
CHA 1737 5081 601 1277 484 .182 194 100 17 197 61 1722 .304 .229 .542 0 0 221
CLE 1768 5064 630 1264 533 .168 233 66 16 160 55 1677 .291 .215 .537 0 0 234
DET 1768 5193 673 1371 560 .186 202 96 17 190 59 1816 .332 .236 .603 0 0 202
NYA 1693 5198 575 1277 492 .196 194 59 35 179 25 1694 .309 .247 .573 0 0 158
PHA 1620 5010 447 1212 380 .193 169 65 19 151 53 1568 .313 .246 .576 0 0 157
SLA 1820 5155 591 1262 499 .176 181 50 14 234 118 1585 .351 .219 .577 164
WS1 1727 5114 534 1238 468 .195 170 60 12 185 49 1564 .309 .255 .573 0 0 164

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 259 91 63 1412 584 463 5629 1221 10 29.670 388 480 76 23 16 26 3
CHA 295 89 65 1411 644 405 5487 1189 14 21.810 371 498 73 18 15 22 5
CLE 297 77 77 1412 537 467 5739 1383 16 76.240 455 602 65 9 16 33 5
DET 281 87 67 1408 531 578 5688 1254 12 42.770 465 595 81 8 13 37 3
NYA 258 80 74 1429 616 476 5640 1249 37 33.310 440 561 84 11 17 22 1
PHA 234 36 117 1344 575 715 5653 1311 26 142.260 585 776 94 11 3 53 5
SLA 299 79 75 1444 505 478 5750 1292 15 68.290 414 545 74 9 13 18 4
WS1 266 76 77 1431 706 490 5765 1271 14 37.690 424 543 85 11 7 44 6

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1693 6447 4220 2044 183 .979 0 0 0 0 14
CHA 1603 6414 4235 1974 205 .925 0 0 0 0 6
CLE 1628 6652 4233 2187 232 .941 0 0 0 0 23
DET 1595 6501 4217 2073 211 .956 0 0 0 0 13
NYA 1579 6581 4278 2084 219 .940 0 0 0 0 10
PHA 1516 6460 4019 2127 314 .950 0 0 0 0 19
SLA 1645 6768 4333 2187 248 .908 0 0 0 0 20
WS1 1619 6396 4276 1888 232 .943 0 0 0 0 32

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1916 World Series, American League, Babe Ruth, Boston Red Sox, Brooklyn Robins, Carl Mays, Dutch Leonard, Eddie Cicotte, George Sisler, Joe Jackson, Red Faber, Rube Foster, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, Wally Schang, Walter Johnson

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