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Series Wrapup

Story

The New York Yankees began defense of their first American League pennant without their best player in 1922.  Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis suspended Babe Ruth for the first six weeks of the season after Ruth ignored a rule in place at the time prohibiting World Series participants from playing in exhibition games during the off-season by taking part in a barnstorming tour following the Yankee loss to the Giants in the 1921 Fall Classic.  Making his first appearance of the 1922 campaign on May 2, Ruth nevertheless ended up leading New York with 35 home runs, 99 runs batted in, a .434 on-base percentage, and a .672 slugging percentage, while placing second on the team with a .315 batting average.

In spite of the subpar numbers posted by Ruth during the regular season, the Yankees repeated as American League champions, barely edging out the second-place St. Louis Browns by one game, with a record of 94-60.  However, the loss of Ruth for a significant part of the season hurt New York’s offense considerably.  After establishing a new A.L. record by scoring 948 runs the previous year, the Yankees tallied a total of only 758 runs in 1922 – the fourth most in the junior circuit.  That total placed them more than 100 runs behind the league-leading St. Louis Browns, who topped the circuit with 867 runs scored.  First baseman Wally Pipp was New York’s most reliable hitter, leading the team with a .329 batting average and 190 hits, while also driving in 90 runs and scoring 96 others.    

The Yankees ended up capturing their second consecutive league championship largely on the strength of their outstanding pitching.  They surrendered a league-low 618 runs to their opposition, compiling in the process a team ERA of 3.39.  The newly-acquired Joe Bush anchored the pitching staff, finishing the year with a record of 26-7, a 3.31 ERA, and 20 complete games.  Bob Shawkey posted 20 victories and led the team with a 2.91 ERA, 22 complete games, and 300 innings pitched.  Waite Hoyt added another 19 wins.  

However, the season ended in utter disappointment for the Yankees for the second straight time when the Giants again defeated them in the World Series, this time by a 4-0 count (the Yankees managed a tie in Game Two).  The Giants outscored the Yankees 18-11 during the Fall Classic, with Ruth making virtually no impact.  With Giants manager John McGraw instructing his pitchers to throw nothing but curveballs to Ruth, the Yankee slugger failed to make the necessary adjustments.  He managed just two singles in 17 times at-bat, for a batting average of only .118.    

Although the Yankees finished one game ahead of St. Louis in the A.L. pennant race, it could be argued that the Browns were a better team.  They certainly had more offensive weapons than New York.  Baby Doll Jacobson batted .317, drove in 102 runs, and collected 16 triples.  Second baseman Marty McManus batted .312 and knocked in 109 runs.  Jack Tobin batted .331 and placed among the league leaders with 122 runs scored and 207 hits.  Fellow outfielder Ken Williams temporarily replaced Babe Ruth as the league’s top slugger.  In addition to batting .332, stealing 37 bases, and scoring 128 runs, Williams led the American League with 39 home runs, 155 runs batted in, and 367 total bases.  Meanwhile, first baseman George Sisler topped the circuit in five different offensive categories.  Sisler won the batting title with a mark of .420, and he also led the league with 134 runs scored, 246 hits, 18 triples, and 51 stolen bases.  Sisler’s exceptional performance earned him recognition as the American League’s first winner of the modern MVP Award.  

Still, the Browns did not have a monopoly on outstanding batsmen in the junior circuit.  Tris Speaker posted a batting average of .378 for Cleveland and led the league with 48 doubles and a .474 on-base percentage.  Detroit’s Ty Cobb finished second in the league with 211 hits and a .401 batting average, and he also placed among the leaders in doubles, triples, total bases, and on-base percentage.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• April 30 – In just his fourth career start, Chicago White Sox pitcher Charlie Robertson threw the fifth perfect game in major league history, shutting out the Tigers 2-0 at Navin Field in Detroit.

• Despite pitching for the seventh-place A’s, Eddie Rommel led the American League with 27 wins.

• George Sisler established a new American League record by hitting successfully in 41 straight games.

• Chicago White Sox hurler Red Faber led all A.L. pitchers with a 2.81 ERA.

• By winning 22 games while compiling a 4.08 ERA for Cleveland, George Uhle became the first pitcher since 1897 to reach 20 wins while posting an ERA over 4.00.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1739 5294 598 1392 510 .215 250 55 45 64 66 1887 .316 .282 .618 160
CHA 1602 5267 691 1464 635 .168 245 63 45 109 84 1970 .391 .219 .661 0 0 232
CLE 1793 5291 767 1546 698 .226 320 73 32 90 58 2108 .387 .286 .712 0 0 202
DET 1740 5360 828 1642 735 .290 247 89 54 78 60 2229 .421 .368 .804 0 0 242
NYA 1603 5240 757 1502 677 .256 221 73 95 62 58 2154 .346 .365 .727 0 0 220
PHA 1718 5216 704 1409 631 .218 229 63 111 60 69 2097 .331 .286 .673 169
SLA 1623 5425 868 1684 785 .265 292 94 98 136 75 2458 .358 .376 .750 0 0 199
WS1 1642 5203 650 1395 575 .198 229 76 45 97 61 1911 .320 .253 .621 153

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 284 61 93 1373 359 503 5483 1508 48 57.450 656 766 71 10 6 28 3
CHA 254 77 77 1405 484 529 6070 1472 57 133.340 614 691 86 13 8 16 2
CLE 290 78 76 1384 489 464 6116 1605 58 180.790 705 817 76 14 7 28 3
DET 288 79 75 1392 461 473 6148 1554 62 57.480 660 789 67 7 15 19 2
NYA 223 94 60 1394 458 423 5836 1402 73 24.270 525 618 100 7 14 20 1
PHA 302 65 89 1362 373 469 6006 1573 107 71.770 695 828 73 4 6 22 2
SLA 269 93 61 1393 534 419 5903 1412 71 37.390 523 634 79 8 22 17 8
WS1 251 69 85 1364 422 500 6017 1485 49 80.950 577 705 84 13 10 31 7

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1585 6316 4096 1999 221 .963 0 0 0 0 10
CHA 1530 6320 4194 1973 153 .948 0 0 0 0 3
CLE 1642 6259 4124 1934 201 .927 0 0 0 0 20
DET 1613 6375 4167 2016 192 .938 0 0 0 0 10
NYA 1529 6305 4157 1993 155 .974 0 0 0 0 17
PHA 1597 6268 4072 1978 218 .950 0 0 0 0 16
SLA 1536 6234 4156 1881 197 .964 0 0 0 0 7
WS1 1539 6281 4066 2014 201 .968 0 0 0 0 11

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1922 World Series, American League, Babe Ruth, Baby Doll Jacobson, Bob Shawkey, Charlie Robertson, Eddie Rommel, George Sisler, George Uhle, Jack Tobin, Joe Bush, John McGraw, Ken Williams, Kenesaw Landis, Marty McManus, New York Giants, New York Yankees, Red Faber, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, Waite Hoyt, Wally Pipp

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