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Series Wrapup

Story

With baseball’s home run trend gradually picking up steam throughout the 1920s, the ensuing decade began with arguably the greatest offensive explosion in the history of the game.  The 1930 campaign produced several record-breaking hitting performances, particularly in the National League, where Chicago’s Hack Wilson drove in a major-league record 190 runs and New York’s Bill Terry became the last player in the senior circuit to compile a batting average in excess of .400.   

The New York Yankees led the charge in the American League, establishing a new major league record by scoring a total of 1,062 runs.  Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig both had monstrous years for New York.  Ruth led the league with 49 home runs, 136 bases on balls, a .493 on-base percentage, and a .732 slugging percentage, while also finishing among the leaders with 153 runs batted in, 150 runs scored, and a .359 batting average.  Gehrig established a new American League record by driving in 174 runs, and he also placed near the top of the league rankings with 41 homers, 143 runs scored, 220 hits, 17 triples, 42 doubles, a .379 batting average, a .473 on-base percentage, and a .721 slugging percentage.  However, New York finished next-to-last in the junior circuit in runs allowed, permitting the opposition to cross the plate 898 times over the course of the regular season.  Their poor pitching relegated the Yankees to a distant third-place finish in the A.L., 16 games behind the pennant-winning Philadelphia Athletics.  

The A’s won their second straight league championship by posting a record of 102-52 that placed them eight games ahead of the second-place Washington Senators in the final standings.  The Senators’ league-leading pitching staff, which allowed the fewest runs in the league (689) and posted the lowest team ERA (3.96), helped them improve their record by 23 games over the previous year.  Shortstop Joe Cronin also contributed significantly to Washington’s improved play by batting .346, driving in 126 runs, scoring 127 others, collecting 203 hits, accumulating 41 doubles, and leading all players at his position in putouts and assists.  Although neither major league presented an official MVP trophy at season’s end, The Sporting News named Cronin its “unofficial” A.L. MVP at the end of the year.

The Athletics, though, were clearly the most well-balanced team in the American League.  They finished second to the Yankees with 951 runs scored, and they also placed second to the Senators with 751 runs allowed.  Lefty Grove anchored Philadelphia’s pitching staff, leading the league in virtually every major statistical category.  Compiling remarkable numbers in a year dominated by hitting, Grove led all A.L. hurlers with a record of 28-5, a 2.54 ERA, 209 strikeouts, nine shutouts, and nine saves.  He also finished among the leaders with 22 complete games and 291 innings pitched.  Grove pitched so effectively that his 2.54 ERA placed him 77 points ahead of league runner-up Wes Ferrell, who posted a mark of 3.31 for fourth-place Cleveland.

Meanwhile, the trio of Al Simmons, Jimmie Foxx, and Mickey Cochrane led the A’s offensive attack.  Simmons placed among the league-leaders with 36 home runs, 165 runs batted in, 211 hits, 16 triples, 41 doubles, and a .708 slugging percentage, and he topped the circuit with 152 runs scored and a .381 batting average.  Foxx finished near the top of the league rankings with 37 home runs, 156 runs batted in, 127 runs scored, and a .335 batting average.  Cochrane batted .357 and scored 110 runs.

Seeking to win their second consecutive world championship, the Athletics faced the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series.  Although the St. Louis pitching staff held Philadelphia to a team batting average of just .197, the A’s outscored the Cardinals by a 21-12 margin, en route to taking the Series in six games.  Lefty Grove and George Earnshaw each won two games for the A’s, posting a combined ERA of 1.02.  Jimmie Foxx delivered the big blow of the Series, giving Philadelphia a 2-0 victory and a three-games-to-two lead with a two-run homer in the ninth inning of Game Five.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• By compiling 209 strikeouts, Lefty Grove became the first American League pitcher since 1916 to fan more than 200 batters in a season.

• After a long holdout, Babe Ruth finally signed for a major-league record $80,000.

• American League batters compiled a loop record .421 slugging percentage.

• The Senators’ staff ERA of 3.96 made them the only major league team to post a team ERA below 4.00.

• Babe Ruth became the first documented player to fan 1,000 times.

• Washington’s Sam Rice established major league records for players at least 40 years of age by collecting 207 hits, scoring 121 runs, and amassing 271 total bases.

• Cleveland's Johnny Hodapp led the American League with 225 hits and 51 doubles.

Earle Combs topped the American League with 22 triples.

• In June, the Washington Senators traded Goose Goslin to the St. Louis Browns for Al Crowder and Heinie Manush.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1776 5286 612 1391 533 .220 257 67 47 42 35 1923 .301 .299 .632 0 0 144
CHA 1825 5416 729 1497 679 .237 256 91 63 74 39 2124 .331 .320 .660 153
CLE 1763 5439 890 1654 830 .254 356 60 72 51 47 2346 .355 .334 .723 0 0 174
DET 1754 5298 783 1504 728 .230 298 90 82 97 70 2228 .335 .325 .690 0 0 145
NYA 1801 5447 1062 1683 986 .257 298 110 152 91 60 2657 .350 .360 .721 0 0 162
PHA 1703 5346 951 1573 895 .244 320 74 125 50 33 2416 .381 .340 .733 183
SLA 1672 5277 751 1415 691 .252 288 67 75 93 71 2062 .344 .358 .703 155
WS1 1689 5369 892 1620 819 .208 297 98 57 101 68 2284 .330 .287 .654 173

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 246 52 102 1360 356 488 5992 1515 75 62.580 708 812 78 4 5 18 2
CHA 300 62 92 1362 471 407 6053 1629 74 68.700 713 884 63 2 10 17 1
CLE 293 81 73 1361 441 528 6181 1663 85 84.690 738 913 68 5 14 23 9
DET 291 75 79 1353 574 570 6026 1507 86 93.970 706 832 68 4 17 27 0
NYA 304 86 68 1368 572 524 6161 1566 93 123.920 742 886 65 7 15 38 3
PHA 290 102 52 1371 672 488 5966 1457 84 81.580 652 751 72 8 21 25 5
SLA 276 64 90 1371 470 449 6091 1639 124 57.080 773 896 68 5 10 10 1
WS1 265 94 60 1368 524 504 5848 1367 52 51.710 603 687 78 6 14 15 2

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1581 6102 4084 1824 194 .949 0 0 0 0 12
CHA 1650 6159 4063 1863 233 .959 0 0 0 0 15
CLE 1633 6243 4080 1925 238 .928 0 0 0 0 8
DET 1629 5875 4034 1653 188 .964 0 0 0 0 17
NYA 1687 5969 4083 1678 208 .956 0 0 0 0 12
PHA 1620 5923 4127 1651 145 .954 0 0 0 0 11
SLA 1564 6175 4114 1872 189 .966 0 0 0 0 4
WS1 1589 6051 4110 1786 155 .954 0 0 0 0 4

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1930 World Series, Al Simmons, Alvin Crowder, American League, Babe Ruth, Connie Mack, Earle Combs, George Earnshaw, Goose Goslin, Heinie Manush, Jimmie Foxx, Joe Cronin, Johnny Hodapp, Lefty Grove, Lou Gehrig, Mickey Cochrane, Philadelphia Athletics, Sam Rice, St. Louis Cardinals, Wes Ferrell

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