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Series Wrapup

Story

Monster seasons from Detroit’s Charlie Gehringer and Hank Greenberg couldn’t prevent Joe McCarthy’s New York Yankees from capturing their second consecutive American League pennant in 1937.  Gehringer won the batting title with a mark of .371, scored 133 runs, and drove in 96 others, en route to earning league MVP honors.  Greenberg nearly matched Lou Gehrig’s 1931 A.L. record by driving in 183 runs.  He also finished among the league leaders with 40 home runs, 137 runs scored, 200 hits, a .337 batting average, 49 doubles, 14 triples, 102 walks, a .436 on-base percentage, and a .668 slugging percentage.  However, the Yankees’ extraordinary team balance enabled them to overcome the efforts of the two Detroit stars.  New York finished the regular season with a record of 102-52, a full 13 games ahead of the second-place Tigers.

The Yankee machine scored a league-leading 979 runs, surrendered a league-low 671 runs, and compiled an A.L. best 3.65 team ERA.  Lefty Gomez anchored New York’s pitching staff, winning his second pitcher’s Triple Crown by topping all A.L. hurlers with 21 wins, a 2.33 ERA, and 194 strikeouts.  He also led the league with six shutouts and finished second in the circuit with 25 complete games and 278 innings pitched.  Gomez received a considerable amount of help from Red Ruffing, who finished 20-7, with a 2.98 ERA and 22 complete games.  

Red Rolfe served as leadoff hitter for baseball’s most potent offense.  The third baseman finished second in the league with 143 runs scored.  Shortstop Frank Crosetti crossed the plate 127 times.  Catcher Bill Dickey had the most productive season of his career, hitting 29 home runs, driving in 133 runs, and batting .332.  

Meanwhile, Lou Gehrig and Joe DiMaggio rivaled Gehringer and Greenberg as the sport’s most formidable batting duo.  Gehrig placed among the league leaders with 37 home runs, 159 runs batted in, 138 runs scored, a .351 batting average, and a .643 slugging percentage.  He also topped the circuit with 127 bases on balls and a .473 on-base percentage.  DiMaggio led the league with 46 home runs, 151 runs scored, 418 total bases, and a .673 slugging percentage, while also finishing among the leaders with 167 runs batted in, 215 hits, 15 triples, a .346 batting average, and a .412 on-base percentage.  Gehrig placed fourth in the league MVP voting, while DiMaggio finished a close second to Gehringer in the balloting.  

The Yankees subsequently faced the National League champion New York Giants in the second consecutive “Subway Series” between the two clubs.  The Yankees again proved to be too strong for their N.L. counterparts, defeating their former Polo Grounds co-occupants in five games.  After the Yankees won the first three games by a combined margin of 21-3, Carl Hubbell provided the Giants with their only highlight of the Fall Classic by pitching his team to victory in Game Four.  However, Lefty Gomez gave the Yankees their sixth world championship by throwing his second complete-game victory of the Series the next day.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• June 1 - Bill Dietrich pitched a no-hitter in an 8-0 Chicago White Sox victory over the St. Louis Browns.

• July 7 - The American League defeated the National League, 8-3, in the All-Star Game, held at Washington’s Griffith Stadium.

• December 6 - The Boston Red Sox acquired the contract of 19-year-old Ted Williams.

• In his first full season, Cleveland's Bob Feller struck out 150 batters in 149 innings.

• Detroit's Rudy York established a new record by hitting 18 home runs in the month of August.  He also knocked in 49 runs.

• On May 25, New York Yankees hurler Bump Hadley beaned Detroit’s Mickey Cochrane with a fastball, ending the Hall of Fame player-manager’s career.

• Cleveland's Johnny Allen topped the American League with a .938 winning percentage.  Allen won his first 15 decisions, before suffering his only loss on the season’s final day.

• Beau Bell of the Browns led the American League with 218 hits and 51 doubles.  

• The Hall of Fame inducted Nap Lajoie, Tris Speaker, Cy Young, John McGraw, Connie Mack, George Wright, Morgan Bulkeley, and Ban Johnson.

Wes Ferrell led the American League with 26 complete games and 281 innings pitched.

• Clint Brown of the White Sox topped the majors with 18 saves.

• The Tigers led the majors with a .292 team batting average.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1662 5354 821 1506 769 .247 269 64 100 79 61 2203 .358 .341 .712 104
CHA 1639 5277 780 1478 726 .238 280 76 67 70 34 2111 .386 .320 .706 0 0 111
CLE 1713 5353 817 1499 754 .227 304 76 103 78 51 2264 .327 .323 .676 0 0 96
DET 1695 5516 935 1611 873 .215 309 62 150 89 45 2494 .351 .310 .673 0 0 70
NYA 1633 5487 979 1554 922 .207 282 73 174 60 36 2504 .341 .299 .676 61
PHA 1763 5228 699 1398 649 .232 278 60 94 95 48 2078 .319 .321 .651 70
SLA 1766 5510 715 1573 682 .197 327 44 71 30 27 2201 .333 .266 .660 0 0 85
WS1 1682 5578 757 1559 691 .214 245 84 47 61 35 2113 .391 .277 .700 67

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 286 80 72 1366 682 597 6132 1518 92 59.830 682 775 74 6 14 22 3
CHA 262 86 68 1353 533 532 5890 1435 115 49.760 626 730 70 14 21 24 1
CLE 316 83 71 1367 630 566 6048 1529 61 72.570 666 767 64 4 15 18 4
DET 287 89 65 1377 485 635 6181 1521 102 75.250 746 841 70 6 11 24 4
NYA 257 102 52 1395 652 506 6015 1417 92 46.460 566 671 82 15 21 16 2
PHA 297 54 97 1335 469 613 6016 1490 105 68.710 720 854 65 6 9 40 3
SLA 313 46 108 1362 468 653 6371 1770 143 145.470 909 1023 55 2 8 34 0
WS1 280 73 80 1399 535 676 6222 1498 96 81.930 711 841 75 5 14 23 4

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1577 5932 4099 1656 177 .944 0 0 0 0 9
CHA 1540 6092 4051 1867 174 .941 0 0 0 0 10
CLE 1602 6109 4087 1865 157 .957 0 0 0 0 8
DET 1577 6111 4139 1825 147 .964 0 0 0 0 19
NYA 1555 6107 4185 1752 170 .962 0 0 0 0 7
PHA 1619 5929 4005 1725 199 .963 0 0 0 0 15
SLA 1616 6159 4088 1897 174 .947 0 0 0 0 8
WS1 1581 6136 4194 1772 170 .947 0 0 0 0 13

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1937 World Series, American League, Beau Bell, Bill Dickey, Bill Dietrich, Bob Feller, Bump Hadley, Carl Hubbell, Charlie Gehringer, Clint Brown, Earl Averill, Frankie Crosetti, Hal Trosky, Hank Greenberg, Jimmie Foxx, Joe Cronin, Joe DiMaggio, Joe McCarthy, Johnny Allen, Lefty Gomez, Lou Gehrig, Mickey Cochrane, New York Giants, New York Yankees, Red Rolfe, Red Ruffing, Rudy York, Ted Williams, Wes Ferrell

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