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Series Wrapup

Story

Cleveland’s Al Rosen had one of the greatest seasons by any American League third baseman in history in 1953, when he captured league MVP honors by topping the circuit with 43 home runs, 145 runs batted in, and 115 runs scored.  By also finishing just one point behind Mickey Vernon in the batting race with a mark of .336, Rosen just missed winning the Triple Crown.  However, the third baseman’s extraordinary performance wasn’t enough to overcome New York’s exceptional team balance, as the Yankees established a new major league record by winning their fifth consecutive league championship.  New York finished the season with a record of 99-52, 8 ½ games ahead of the second-place Indians.  The Chicago White Sox finished third, 11 ½ games off the pace.  

Perhaps the strongest pennant-winning ball club managed by Casey Stengel, the 1953 Yankees led the American League with 801 runs scored and also surrendered the fewest runs of any team in the junior circuit (547).  Returning to New York from his two-year military commitment, Whitey Ford led the team’s deep pitching staff with a record of 18-6 and 11 complete games, while also compiling an ERA of 3.00.  Crafty left-hander Ed Lopat finished 16-4 with a league-leading 2.42 ERA.  Vic Raschi posted 13 victories, while spot-starters/long relievers Allie Reynolds and Johnny Sain won 13 and 14 games, respectively.  Reynolds also finished among the league leaders with 13 saves.

The Yankees also had a considerable amount of depth in their lineup.  Second baseman Billy Martin had his finest offensive season, hitting 15 home runs, driving in 75 runs, and scoring 72 others.  Third baseman Gil McDougald batted .285, knocked in 83 runs, and finished second on the team with 82 runs scored.  Leadoff hitter Hank Bauer batted .304 and scored 77 runs.  Gene Woodling led the team with a .306 batting average and a .429 on-base percentage.  Mickey Mantle hit 21 home runs, drove in 92 runs, batted .295, and finished third in the league with 105 runs scored.  Yogi Berra batted .296 and led the team with 27 homers and 108 runs batted in, en route to earning a second-place finish to Rosen in the A.L. MVP voting.

The Yankees faced a true test in the World Series, going up against a Brooklyn Dodgers team that posted 105 victories during the regular season.  After New York took a two-games-to-none lead in the Fall Classic, Brooklyn fought back to win the next two contests by scores of 3-2 and 7-3.  However, the Yankees overpowered the Dodgers in Game Five by a score of 11-7, behind home runs by Woodling, Mantle, Martin, and McDougald.  They then won their major-league record fifth straight world championship by defeating the Dodgers in Game Six on an RBI single by Billy Martin in the bottom of the ninth inning.  Martin earned Series MVP honors by collecting 12 hits, batting .500, hitting two home runs, and driving in eight runs.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• April 17 - Mickey Mantle hit the longest measured home run in history when he drove a pitch from Washington’s Chuck Stobbs some 565 feet from home plate, completely out of Griffith Stadium.

• May 6 - At Sportsman's Park, Bobo Holloman of the St. Louis Browns became the only pitcher ever to toss a no-hitter in his first major league start, as he shut out Philadelphia 6-0.  Holloman won only two more games in his brief major league career.
   
• June 3 - Congress cited the research of New York City librarian Robert Henderson in proving that Alexander Cartwright "founded" baseball and not Abner Doubleday.  Henderson’s 1947 book “Bat, Ball and Bishop” documented Cartwright's contributions to the origins of the game of baseball.

• September 13 - Pitcher Bob Trice became the first black player in Philadelphia Athletics history.

• October 7 – Facing dwindling attendance and revenue, Bill Veeck was forced to sell the St. Louis Browns to a Baltimore-based group led by attorney Clarence Miles and brewer Jerry Hoffberger.  The Browns moved to Baltimore the following season and subsequently became known as the Orioles.  

• Detroit Tigers rookie shortstop Harvey Kuenn led the league with 209 hits, en route to winning A.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Washington’s Mickey Vernon won his second American League batting title with a mark of .337.  He also knocked in 115 runs, scored 101 others, collected 205 hits, and led the league with 43 doubles.

• On June 18, the Red Sox sent a record 23 men to the plate in the seventh inning, en route to scoring an all-time record 17 runs.  Gene Stephens became the only player in modern major league history to collect three hits in one inning.

• Washington's Bob Porterfield led the American League with 22 wins, 24 complete games, and nine shutouts.

• Philadelphia’s Gus Zernial batted .284 and placed among the league leaders with 42 home runs and 108 runs batted in.

• Chicago’s Minnie Minoso batted .313, knocked in 104 runs, scored 104 others, and led the league with 25 stolen bases.

• Cleveland’s Larry Doby hit 29 home runs, drove in 102 runs, and scored 92 others.

• The Hall of Fame inducted Dizzy Dean, Al Simmons, Ed Barrow, Chief Bender, Tommy Connolly, Bill Klem, Bobby Wallace, and Harry Wright.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BOS 1944 5246 656 1385 614 .218 255 37 101 33 45 2017 .328 .303 .660 109 99
CHA 1923 5212 716 1345 669 .181 226 53 74 73 55 1899 .300 .240 .556 146 0 120
CLE 1915 5285 770 1426 730 .209 201 29 160 33 29 2165 .343 .302 .688 125 0 90
DET 1971 5553 695 1479 661 .214 259 44 108 30 35 2150 .343 .302 .685 139 63
NYA 1930 5194 801 1420 762 .235 226 52 139 34 44 2167 .356 .350 .729 105 77
PHA 1826 5455 632 1398 588 .198 205 38 116 41 24 2027 .305 .271 .594 141 0 51
SLA 1956 5264 555 1310 522 .186 214 25 112 17 34 1910 .310 .267 .593 144 0 89
WS1 1703 5149 687 1354 644 .187 230 53 69 65 36 1897 .302 .242 .558 134 0 82

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BOS 367 84 69 1373 642 584 5930 1333 92 58.670 547 632 41 14 37 28 3
CHA 340 89 65 1404 714 583 5963 1299 113 59.100 532 592 57 16 33 37 5
CLE 290 92 62 1375 586 519 5807 1311 92 60.070 556 627 81 11 15 24 2
DET 376 60 94 1417 645 585 6351 1633 154 127.530 826 923 50 2 16 43 2
NYA 327 99 52 1358 604 500 5724 1286 94 45.660 483 547 50 16 38 15 2
PHA 322 59 95 1411 566 594 6186 1475 121 81.080 731 799 51 6 11 51 2
SLA 404 54 100 1382 639 626 6113 1467 101 68.830 688 778 28 7 24 33 3
WS1 284 76 76 1345 515 478 5686 1313 112 71.610 547 614 76 16 10 16 2

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BOS 1777 6005 4127 1731 147 .963 0 0 0 0 8
CHA 1745 6110 4209 1776 125 .942 0 0 0 0 4
CLE 1738 6047 4121 1800 126 .949 0 0 0 0 13
DET 1749 6119 4242 1742 135 .946 0 0 0 0 20
NYA 1767 5945 4077 1742 126 .941 0 0 0 0 10
PHA 1657 6066 4219 1710 137 .974 0 0 0 0 15
SLA 1759 5946 4150 1644 152 .956 0 0 0 0 8
WS1 1551 5788 4030 1638 120 .931 0 0 0 0 12

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1953 World Series, Al Rosen, Allie Reynolds, American League, Bill Veeck, Billy Martin, Bob Lemon, Bob Porterfield, Bob Trice, Bobo Holloman, Brooklyn Dodgers, Casey Stengel, Chuck Stobbs, Ed Lopat, Gene Stephens, Gene Woodling, Gil McDougald, Gus Zernial, Hank Bauer, Harvey Kuenn, Johnny Sain, Larry Doby, Mickey Mantle, Mickey Vernon, Minnie Minoso, New York Yankees, Vic Raschi, Whitey Ford, Yogi Berra

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