TheBaseballPage.com

Series Wrapup

Story

After dominating the baseball world the previous year, the New York Yankees had a far more difficult time capturing the American League pennant in 1962.  Although the Yankees won their third straight flag by finishing the regular season with a record of 96-66, they received a stiff challenge from the Minnesota Twins, who placed second in the league, just five games behind the A.L. champions.  In only their second year of existence, the surprising Los Angeles Angels came in third, 10 games off the pace.  

The Yankees failed to ascend to quite the same heights they reached during that magical 1961 campaign.  They won 13 fewer games and hit 41 fewer home runs.  Nevertheless, New York still featured the American League’s best offense, topping the circuit with 817 runs scored, a .267 team batting average, and a .426 team slugging percentage.  The Yankees also finished a close second in home runs (199) and on-base percentage (.337).  

Elston Howard and Bill Skowron both had solid years on offense, combining for 44 home runs and 171 runs batted in.  In addition to playing a stellar third base, Clete Boyer had his finest offensive season in pinstripes, hitting 18 homers, driving in 68 runs, scoring 85 others, and batting .272.  Tom Tresh earned A.L. Rookie of the Year honors by hitting 20 home runs, knocking in 93 runs, scoring 94 others, and batting .286.  Roger Maris followed up his record-setting 1961 campaign by hitting 33 homers and driving in 100 runs.  Bobby Richardson earned a second-place finish in the league MVP voting by batting .302, placing among the league leaders with 99 runs scored and 38 doubles, and topping the circuit with 209 hits.  Finishing just ahead of Richardson in the balloting was Mickey Mantle, who won his third trophy even though he appeared in only 123 games and accumulated just 377 official at-bats.  Mantle hit 30 home runs, knocked in 89 runs, scored 96 others, finished second in the league with a .321 batting average, and topped the circuit with 122 walks, a .486 on-base percentage, and a .605 slugging percentage.  

The Yankees remained the junior circuit’s most well-balanced ball club, also finishing second in the league with a team ERA of 3.70.  Ralph Terry had the finest season of his career, leading all A.L. hurlers with 23 victories and 299 innings pitched, while also compiling a 3.19 ERA.  Whitey Ford posted a record of 17-8 and placed among the league leaders with a 2.90 ERA and 258 innings pitched.    

The Yankees entered the World Series against the San Francisco Giants hoping to capture their 20th world championship.  The Giants proved to be a worthy foe, splitting the first six contests with New York, to set the stage for a decisive Game Seven.  After splitting their first two decisions in the Series, Ralph Terry and Jack Sanford matched up against one another for a third time, battling each other right down to the wire in one of the most closely-contested Game Sevens in the history of the Fall Classic.  With the Yankees clinging to a 1-0 lead in the bottom of the ninth inning, Giants slugger Willie McCovey stepped to the plate with two men out and the tying and winning runs in scoring position.  After lofting a long fly ball just foul down the right field line, McCovey drove a vicious line drive directly at Bobby Richardson, who made the grab for the Series-clinching out.
 
Although the Yankees represented the American League in the World Series, the second-place Minnesota Twins demonstrated that they were likely to present a serious threat to New York’s reign as league champions in the near future.  The Twins finished right behind the Yankees with 798 runs scored and 185 home runs, and their pitching staff featured two of the league’s top hurlers.  Camilo Pascual finished 20-11, with a 3.32 ERA and a league-leading 18 complete games, five shutouts, and 206 strikeouts.  Jim Kaat tied his teammate for the league lead with five shutouts, and he also placed among the leaders with 18 wins, a 3.14 ERA, 269 innings pitched, 16 complete games, and 173 strikeouts.  Meanwhile, the trio of Rich Rollins, Bob Allison, and Harmon Killebrew paced the Twins on offense.  Rollins batted .298, drove in 96 runs, and scored 96 others.  Allison hit 29 homers, drove in 102 runs, and scored 102 others.  Killebrew led the league with 48 home runs and 126 runs batted in.

Leon Wagner also had a big year for the surprising Angels, earning a fourth-place finish in the A.L. MVP voting by hitting 37 home runs and knocking in 107 runs.  Rocky Colavito posted equally impressive numbers for the fourth-place Detroit Tigers, who finished just ½ game behind the Angels in the standings.  Colavito hit 37 homers and drove in 112 runs.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• January 23 – The members of the BBWAA selected Bob Feller and Jackie Robinson for the Hall of Fame in their first year of eligibility.

• January 28 – The Veterans Committee voted Edd Roush and Bill McKechnie into the Hall of Fame.

• May 5 - Bo Belinsky of the Angels threw a no-hitter against the Baltimore Orioles.

• June 26 - Earl Wilson of the Red Sox no-hit the Angels.

• July 10 – At newly opened D.C. Stadium, John F. Kennedy became the only U.S. president ever to throw the ceremonial first pitch at an All-Star Game, as the National League defeated the American League, 3–1, in the first All-Star Game of 1962.  

• July 30 – Home runs by Leon Wagner, Pete Runnels, and Rocky Colavito powered the American League past the National League 9–4 in the second All-Star Game of 1962, played at Chicago’s Wrigley Field.  

• August 1 - Bill Monbouquette of Boston tossed a no-hitter against the Chicago White Sox.

• August 26 - Jack Kralick of Minnesota no-hit the Kansas City Athletics.

• September 12 - Washington's Tom Cheney struck out 21 Baltimore Orioles in a 16-inning game that he won by a score of 2-1.

• Harmon Killebrew established a new major league record (since broken) by striking out 142 times.

• Boston's Pete Runnels posted a batting average of .326, en route to winning his second American League batting crown.  

• Bill Fischer of Kansas City pitched a major league record 84-1/3 consecutive innings without issuing a walk.

• Detroit's Norm Cash set a major league record that still stands for the largest drop in batting average (118 points) by a defending league batting champion.

• Chicago’s Nellie Fox played in 150 or more games for an American League record 11th consecutive season.

• Eddie Yost retired with a record 28 homers leading off a game (since broken).

• Detroit’s Hank Aguirre led all A.L. hurlers with a 2.21 ERA.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BAL 2104 5491 652 1363 617 .174 225 34 156 45 32 2124 .319 .251 .608 131 44 75
BOS 1888 5530 707 1429 671 .170 257 53 146 39 33 2230 .279 .252 .560 129 36 59
CHA 2097 5514 707 1415 662 .226 250 56 92 76 40 2053 .364 .329 .713 132 40 82
CLE 2029 5484 682 1341 644 .206 202 22 180 35 16 2127 .316 .293 .644 117 45 52
DET 2040 5456 758 1352 719 .212 191 36 209 69 21 2242 .344 .312 .667 122 38 56
KC1 2084 5576 745 1467 691 .215 220 58 116 76 21 2151 .331 .276 .646 108 50 78
LAA 2157 5499 718 1377 667 .186 232 35 137 46 27 2090 .311 .264 .611 110 43 82
MIN 2069 5561 798 1445 758 .193 215 39 185 33 20 2293 .336 .281 .656 129 50 71
NYA 2058 5644 817 1509 791 .198 240 29 199 42 29 2404 .339 .289 .689 123 54 79
WS2 2140 5484 599 1370 566 .195 206 38 132 99 53 2048 .283 .294 .605 135 36 71

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BAL 415 77 85 1461 898 549 6204 1373 147 90.670 600 680 32 4 33 46 2
BOS 382 76 84 1437 923 632 6280 1416 159 90.480 673 756 34 10 40 48 5
CHA 427 85 77 1451 821 537 6163 1380 123 66.330 602 658 50 11 28 33 1
CLE 404 80 82 1442 780 594 6199 1410 174 83.210 663 745 45 12 31 27 9
DET 406 85 76 1444 873 503 6254 1452 169 91.930 611 692 46 7 35 35 6
KC1 436 72 90 1435 825 655 6321 1450 199 140.750 764 837 32 4 33 63 5
LAA 507 86 76 1463 858 616 6373 1412 118 89.860 602 706 23 11 47 39 3
MIN 404 91 71 1464 948 493 6174 1400 166 94.590 633 713 53 11 27 55 3
NYA 410 96 66 1472 838 499 6198 1375 146 56.740 605 680 33 6 42 27 1
WS2 428 60 101 1443 771 593 6221 1400 151 76.220 649 716 38 10 13 31 9

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BAL 2498 7333 5448 1738 147 .970 17546 80 40 0 32
BOS 2232 7202 5316 1735 151 .955 17251 70 24 0 12
CHA 2479 7288 5371 1791 126 .968 17420 72 25 0 13
CLE 2436 7254 5362 1731 161 .971 17295 54 39 1.00 16
DET 2327 7130 5485 1471 174 .965 17322 48 26 0 10
KC1 2456 7179 5266 1758 155 .973 17214 64 29 0 25
LAA 2502 7405 5393 1815 197 .931 17591 52 40 1.00 16
MIN 2521 7311 5361 1802 148 .972 17545 42 32 1.00 13
NYA 2470 7350 5426 1770 154 .970 17644 32 29 1.00 7
WS2 2442 7319 5359 1800 160 .961 17340 45 35 1.00 15

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

More From Around the Web

This day in baseball history

August 30

  • 2011

    Hugh McQuillan and Heinie Mueller combine to ...

  • 2006

    On August 30, 2006, Boston right-hander Curt Schilling fans ...

  • 1999

    On August 30, 1999, Edgardo Alfonzo of the New York Mets bec ...

More Baseball History
Tagged:
1962 World Series, Al Kaline, American League, Bill Fischer, Bill McKechnie, Bill Monbouquette, Bill Skowron, Bo Belinsky, Bob Allison, Bob Feller, Bobby Richardson, Brooks Robinson, Camilo Pascual, Clete Boyer, Earl Wilson, Edd Roush, Eddie Yost, Elston Howard, Hank Aguirre, Harmon Killebrew, Jack Kralick, Jack Sanford, Jackie Robinson, Jim Gentile, Jim Kaat, Leon Wagner, Mickey Mantle, Nellie Fox, New York Yankees, Norm Cash, Pete Runnels, Ralph Terry, Rich Rollins, Rocky Colavito, Roger Maris, San Francisco Giants, Tom Cheney, Tom Tresh, Whitey Ford, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey

Comments

    Be respectful, keep it clean.
Login or register to post comments

Share US

Share |