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Series Wrapup

Story

After the conclusion of the 1965 season, the Baltimore Orioles acquired outfielder Frank Robinson from the Cincinnati Reds for pitcher Milt Pappas and two other players.  The deal turned out to be the best one the Baltimore franchise ever made and, quite possibly, the worst one in the long history of the Cincinnati Reds.  Angered by Cincinnati management, which attempted to justify the trade by describing him as “an old 30,” Robinson entered the 1966 campaign with a huge chip on his shoulder.  Bringing with him to the American League the same aggressive style of play he became noted for in the senior circuit, Robinson showed the baseball world he still had several good years left in him.  In his first year in Baltimore, the right-fielder won the A.L. Triple Crown by topping the circuit with 49 home runs, 122 runs batted in, and a .316 batting average.  Robinson also led the league with 122 runs scored, 367 total bases, a .415 on-base percentage, and a .637 slugging percentage, en route to capturing A.L. MVP honors.  Robinson’s extraordinary performance enabled the Orioles to run away with the American League pennant.  They finished the regular season with a record of 97-63, nine games ahead of the second-place Minnesota Twins, and 10 games in front of the third-place Detroit Tigers.  

Although Robinson clearly served as the driving force behind Baltimore’s successful run to the pennant, he received a considerable amount of help from his Oriole teammates.  First baseman Boog Powell batted .287 and placed third in the league with 34 home runs and 109 runs batted in.  Gold Glove third baseman Brooks Robinson earned a second-place finish in the league MVP balloting by hitting 23 homers, driving in 100 runs, and scoring 91 others.  In addition to playing stellar defense at shortstop, Luis Aparicio batted .276, scored 97 runs, and stole 25 bases. 

Jim Palmer and Dave McNally headed Baltimore’s deep starting rotation.  Palmer finished first on the team with 15 victories, while McNally posted 13 wins and led the starters with a 3.17 ERA.  Stu Miller anchored the Oriole bullpen, saving 18 games and winning nine others.

Entering the World Series as underdogs against the defending world-champion Los Angeles Dodgers, the Orioles surprised virtually everyone by sweeping the Dodgers in four straight games.  After Los Angeles knocked out an uncharacteristically wild Dave McNally in the third inning of Game One, Baltimore reliever Moe Drabowsky shut out the Dodgers the rest of the way, compiling 11 strikeouts, en route to preserving a 5-2 Oriole win.  The Dodgers didn't score again in the Series, as Jim Palmer, Wally Bunker, and McNally tossed consecutive shutouts in leading the Orioles to 6-0, 1-0, and 1-0 victories.  Frank Robinson punctuated his great season by hitting two home runs and earning Series MVP honors.

Although the Orioles clearly established themselves as the class of the American League over the course of the regular season, the Twins and Tigers gave every indication that they were capable of posing threats to Baltimore for championship honors in the near future.  The runner-up  Twins finished third in the league in runs scored, and they also placed second in the circuit in team ERA.  Jim Kaat had a fabulous year on the mound for Minnesota, compiling a 2.75 ERA and leading all A.L. hurlers with 25 wins, 304 innings pitched, and 19 complete games.  Meanwhile, Harmon Killebrew and Tony Oliva paced the Twins on offense.  Killebrew batted .281, finished second in the league with 39 home runs and 110 runs batted in, and topped the circuit with 103 bases on balls.  Oliva hit 25 homers, knocked in 87 runs, placed second in the A.L. with a .307 batting average and 99 runs scored, and led the league with 191 hits. 

The third-place Tigers, who finished second in the league to Baltimore with 719 runs scored, were led on offense by Willie Horton, Al Kaline, and Norm Cash.  Horton hit 27 homers and drove in 100 runs.  Kaline hit 29 home runs, knocked in 88 runs, and finished third in the league with a .288 batting average.  Cash went deep 32 times, drove in 93 runs, scored 98 others, and batted .279. 

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• Baltimore pitching blanked the Dodgers for a Series record 33 consecutive innings after surrendering two runs to Los Angeles early in Game One.

• Paul Blair and Frank Robinson won back-to-back 1-0 games for the Orioles in the Fall Classic with home runs.

• Jim Palmer’s 6-0 victory in Game Two of the Fall Classic made him the youngest pitcher (20) in history to hurl a World Series shutout

• The Yankees’ last-place finish marked the first time since 1912 that they finished at the bottom of the A.L. standings.

• Marvin Miller was elected president of the Major League Players Association.

• The Yankees fired broadcaster Red Barber after he called attention on television to a sparse crowd in Yankee Stadium.

• Sonny Siebert of Cleveland threw a no-hitter against Washington on June 10.

• The White Sox and Angels played the first game at Anaheim Stadium on April 19.

• Kansas City’s Jack Aker established a new major league record by saving 32 games.

• The Hall of Fame inducted Ted Williams and Casey Stengel.

• Chicago's Tommie Agee (22 home runs, 86 RBIs, .273 batting average) earned A.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Luis Aparicio led American League shortstops in fielding average for a record eighth straight year.

• The Yankees fired manager Johnny Keane after a 4-16 start, replacing him at the helm with general manager Ralph Houk.

• Bert Campaneris led the American League with 52 stolen bases.

• Cleveland’s Sam McDowell led all A.L. hurlers with 225 strikeouts.

• Chicago's Gary Peters led the American League with a 1.98 ERA.

• Chicago’s league-leading pitching staff also included Joe Horlen, who placed second in the league with a 2.43 ERA, and Tommy John, who finished fifth with a mark of 2.62.

• Detroit's Denny McLain finished second in the American League with 20 wins and 14 complete games.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BAL 1986 5529 755 1426 703 .210 243 35 175 55 43 2264 .296 .309 .606 119 35 82
BOS 2102 5498 655 1318 617 .182 228 44 145 35 24 2069 .288 .249 .574 131 38 65
CAL 2213 5360 604 1244 562 .148 179 54 122 80 54 1897 .286 .212 .545 104 46 69
CHA 2265 5348 574 1235 524 .192 193 40 87 153 78 1769 .292 .247 .561 94 44 109
CLE 2070 5474 574 1300 536 .177 156 25 155 53 41 1971 .297 .250 .569 113 33 56
DET 2048 5507 719 1383 682 .203 224 45 179 41 34 2234 .320 .318 .675 128 37 67
KC1 2113 5328 564 1259 509 .172 212 56 70 132 50 1793 .266 .232 .529 100 27 71
MIN 1942 5390 663 1341 611 .207 219 33 144 67 42 2058 .331 .289 .652 138 44 49
NYA 1988 5330 611 1254 569 .185 182 36 162 49 29 1994 .271 .270 .558 111 42 58
WS2 2147 5318 557 1245 525 .178 185 40 126 53 37 1888 .279 .240 .550 130 33 84

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BAL 413 97 63 1467 1070 514 6070 1267 127 47.220 541 601 23 7 51 53 6
BOS 473 72 90 1463 977 577 6279 1402 164 91.050 637 731 32 8 31 53 6
CAL 458 80 82 1458 836 511 6100 1364 136 64.420 577 643 31 9 40 49 11
CHA 402 83 79 1475 896 403 5982 1229 101 34.070 440 517 38 19 34 68 6
CLE 388 81 81 1466 1111 489 6049 1260 129 52.540 526 586 49 14 28 51 2
DET 433 88 74 1456 1026 520 6159 1356 185 57.240 622 698 36 9 38 56 6
KC1 466 74 86 1436 854 630 6101 1281 106 89.770 567 648 19 4 47 52 5
MIN 364 89 73 1438 1015 392 5896 1246 139 48.600 501 581 52 9 28 52 1
NYA 387 70 89 1415 842 443 5903 1318 124 44.750 537 612 29 6 32 36 2
WS2 454 71 88 1417 866 448 5878 1282 154 90.440 584 659 25 5 35 43 6

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BAL 2456 7166 5351 1682 133 .972 17596 82 52 1.00 23
BOS 2418 7258 5345 1740 173 .951 17564 116 50 0 13
CAL 2568 7406 5363 1891 152 .972 17489 72 41 0 16
CHA 2645 7536 5360 1997 179 .958 17702 80 41 2.00 24
CLE 2505 7097 5324 1620 153 .974 17607 49 42 1.00 16
DET 2434 7170 5383 1653 134 .955 17453 57 31 0 7
KC1 2498 7199 5358 1683 158 .959 17228 89 48 0 20
MIN 2316 7132 5354 1617 161 .969 17265 65 40 0 5
NYA 2408 7204 5174 1866 164 .961 16980 51 39 1.00 9
WS2 2526 7175 5298 1713 164 .959 17026 55 50 2.00 14

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

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Tagged:
1966 World Series, Al Kaline, American League, Baltimore Orioles, Bert Campaneris, Boog Powell, Brooks Robinson, Casey Stengel, Dave McNally, Denny McLain, Frank Robinson, Gary Peters, Harmon Killebrew, Jack Aker, Jim Kaat, Jim Palmer, Joe Horlen, Johnny Keane, Luis Aparicio, Marvin Miller, Milt Pappas, Moe Drabowsky, Norm Cash, Paul Blair, Ralph Houk, Red Barber, Rocky Colavito, Sam McDowell, Sonny Siebert, Stu Miller, Ted Williams, Tommie Agee, Tommy John, Tony Conigliaro, Tony Oliva, Wally Bunker, Willie Horton

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