TheBaseballPage.com

Series Wrapup

Story

California’s signing of free agent outfielder Reggie Jackson prior to the start of the 1982 season signaled the end of a tumultuous five-year period in New York for the controversial slugger.  Considered by George Steinbrenner to be past his prime, Jackson left New York when the Yankee owner showed little interest in resigning him.  Jackson demonstrated he still had something left by leading the American League with 39 home runs, knocking in 101 runs, and scoring 92 others.  His outstanding performance helped lift the Angels to their second A.L. West title in three years.  The Angels finished the regular season with a record of 93-69, three games ahead of the second-place Kansas City Royals.  The Chicago White Sox finished third in the division, six games back.  

A well-balanced ball club, the Angels finished second in the American League with 814 runs scored, 186 home runs, and a 3.82 team ERA.  Geoff Zahn served as the ace of their pitching staff, posting a record of 18-8.  Meanwhile, Jackson received a great deal of help from the other members of California’s veteran starting lineup.  Rod Carew batted .319 and scored 88 runs.  Brian Downing hit 28 homers, drove in 84 runs, and placed among the league leaders with 109 runs scored.  Fred Lynn batted .299, hit 21 homers, knocked in 86 runs, and scored 89 others.  Don Baylor hit 24 home runs and drove in 93 runs.  Doug DeCinces had the finest season of his career, earning a third-place finish in the A.L. MVP voting by hitting 30 homers, knocking in 97 runs, scoring 94 others, and batting .301.

Despite California’s first-place finish, the division’s two most dynamic players performed for other teams.  Hal McRae had the most productive season of his career for the runner-up Royals, hitting 27 home runs, scoring 91 runs, batting .308, and leading the league with 133 runs batted in.  Meanwhile, Rickey Henderson had a big year for the Oakland A’s, who finished fifth in the division, 25 games off the pace.  Although Henderson batted just .267, he topped the circuit with 116 bases on balls, enabling him to compile an impressive .398 on-base percentage.  He also scored 119 runs and established a new single-season major league record by stealing 130 bases.  

While the Angels failed to clinch the top spot in the A.L. West until the final week of the regular season, the Milwaukee Brewers waited until the season’s final day to lay claim to the Eastern Division title.  The Brewers needed to win just one of their final four games against the Orioles to eliminate Baltimore from the divisional race.  However, the Birds beat Milwaukee three straight times at Memorial Stadium to earn a share of first place and set up a winner-take-all scenario for the season finale.  Led by a four-hit, two-home run performance by league MVP Robin Yount, the Brewers clinched their first A.L. East title with a 10-2 victory over the Orioles.  Milwaukee finished the campaign with a record of 95-67, while Baltimore finished just one game back with a mark of 94-68.

The Brewers actually started off the season slowly, posting a record of only 23-24 over their first 47 games.  However, they caught fire after former A.L. batting champion Harvey Kuenn took over the managerial reins of the team, compiling a mark of 72-43 the rest of the way.  

The Brewers relied heavily on their powerful lineup, which came to be known as “Harvey’s Wall-bangers” for its explosive nature.  Milwaukee led the American League with 891 runs scored, 216 home runs, and a .455 slugging percentage.  Ben Oglivie hit 34 homers and drove in 102 runs.  Ted Simmons hit 23 home runs and knocked in 97 runs.  Although he batted only .245, centerfielder Gorman Thomas drove in 112 runs and tied Reggie Jackson for the league lead with 39 home runs.  Second baseman Paul Molitor batted .302 and topped the circuit with 136 runs scored.  Cecil Cooper scored 104 runs and finished among the league leaders with 32 home runs, 121 runs batted in, a .313 batting average, and 205 hits.  Robin Yount earned A.L. MVP honors by hitting 29 homers, driving in 114 runs, scoring 129 others, batting .331, and leading the league with 210 hits, 46 doubles, 367 total bases, and a .578 slugging average.   

Milwaukee also featured A.L. Cy Young Award winner Pete Vuckovich, who finished 18-6 with a 3.34 ERA.  Meanwhile, Rollie Fingers placed third in the league with 29 saves.

The Brewers subsequently put themselves in a huge hole by losing the first two games of the ALCS to the Angels.  However, they rebounded to win the next three contests, clinching their first American League pennant by scoring twice in the bottom of the seventh inning of Game Five, en route to posting a 4-3 victory.  California’s Fred Lynn earned Series MVP honors, batting .611 (11-for-18) in a losing effort.

Milwaukee got off to a fast start against the Cardinals in the World Series, winning Game One by a score of 10-0 behind five hits by Paul Molitor and another four by Robin Yount.  However, St. Louis took three of the next five contests, to send the Series to a decisive Game Seven.  The Brewers built an early 3-1 lead in the Series finale, but the Cardinals scored three times in the sixth inning, and they tallied another two runs in the eighth, to come away with a 6-3 victory.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• May 30 – Cal Ripken, Jr. started at third base for the Baltimore Orioles, starting his record streak of 2,632 consecutive games played.

• June 6 – While crossing a street in Arlington, Texas, umpire Lou DiMuro was struck by a car; he died early the next day.  Major League Baseball later retired his uniform number 16.

• August 8 – Rollie Fingers earned the 300th save of his career, becoming in the process the first pitcher in history to achieve that mark.

• Robin Yount collected 12 hits in 29 times at-bat in a losing World Series effort, for a .414 batting average.

• Baltimore’s Cal Ripken, Jr. (28 home runs, 93 RBIs, .264 batting average), earned A.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Milwaukee’s Paul Molitor collected a World Series record five hits in the opener.

• The A’s fired Billy Martin as manager after finishing the year with a record of 68-94.

• Baltimore's Eddie Murray earned a second-place finish in the A.L. MVP voting by hitting 32 home runs, knocking in 110 runs, and batting .316.  

• The Twins and Mariners played the first game at the Metrodome on April 6.

• Gaylord Perry won his 300th game on May 6.

• In August, Perry was ejected for the only time in his career for throwing a spitball.

• Kansas City’s John Wathan set a major league record for catchers with 36 stolen bases.

• Kansas City teammate Willie Wilson led the American League with a .332 batting average and 15 triples.

• Boston's Bob Stanley set a new American League record by pitching 168 innings in relief.

• The Hall of Fame inducted Hank Aaron, Frank Robinson, Travis Jackson, and Happy Chandler.

• Texas traded Al Oliver to Montreal for Larry Parrish and Dave Hostetler.

• Oakland dealt Tony Armas and Jeff Newman to Boston for Carney Lansford and two other players.

• Hall of Famers Lloyd Waner and Satchel Paige passed away.

• Robin Yount’s .578 slugging average and 367 total bases established new records for American League shortstops.

• Toronto's Dave Stieb led all A.L. pitchers with 288 innings pitched and 19 complete games.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BAL 2250 5557 774 1478 735 .219 259 27 179 49 38 2328 .374 .347 .779 141 52 57
BOS 2050 5596 753 1536 705 .258 271 31 136 42 39 2277 .336 .358 .694 171 38 53
CAL 2189 5532 814 1518 760 .230 268 26 186 55 53 2396 .360 .363 .723 130 56 114
CHA 2291 5575 786 1523 747 .256 266 52 136 136 58 2301 .345 .391 .736 117 50 54
CLE 2142 5559 683 1458 639 .254 225 32 109 151 68 2074 .372 .356 .729 143 40 74
DET 2125 5590 729 1489 684 .234 237 40 177 93 66 2337 .346 .361 .725 99 39 41
KCA 2083 5629 784 1603 746 .242 295 58 132 133 48 2410 .366 .382 .765 140 49 32
MIN 2064 5544 657 1427 624 .241 234 44 148 38 33 2193 .334 .354 .688 149 51 22
ML4 2014 5733 891 1599 843 .273 277 41 216 84 52 2606 .355 .411 .766 106 46 56
NYA 2130 5526 709 1417 666 .218 225 37 161 69 45 2199 .326 .333 .671 152 49 55
OAK 2174 5448 691 1286 659 .229 211 27 149 232 87 1998 .322 .338 .673 95 54 50
SEA 2195 5626 651 1431 614 .215 259 33 130 131 82 2146 .318 .323 .669 113 35 42
TEX 2073 5445 590 1354 558 .227 204 26 115 63 45 1955 .311 .330 .642 134 32 64
TOR 2264 5526 651 1447 605 .248 262 45 106 118 81 2117 .358 .351 .724 107 50 48

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BAL 394 94 68 1463 719 488 6185 1436 147 54.770 648 687 38 7 34 35 6
BOS 376 89 73 1452 816 478 6246 1557 155 52.760 652 713 23 8 33 24 6
CAL 410 93 69 1464 728 482 6158 1436 124 67.210 621 670 40 10 27 36 4
CHA 420 87 75 1439 753 460 6146 1502 99 82.020 618 710 30 7 41 28 13
CLE 383 78 84 1470 882 589 6307 1433 122 72.510 672 748 31 4 30 56 8
DET 390 83 79 1452 740 554 6115 1371 172 97.00.00 615 685 45 5 27 53 4
KCA 390 90 72 1433 650 471 6109 1443 163 64.530 649 717 16 5 45 43 11
MIN 406 60 102 1434 812 643 6256 1484 208 93.200 759 819 26 4 30 45 12
ML4 376 95 67 1470 717 511 6247 1514 152 67.670 650 717 34 6 47 44 8
NYA 413 79 83 1461 939 491 6220 1471 113 154.140 648 716 24 3 39 41 15
OAK 401 68 94 1455 697 648 6430 1506 177 81.910 735 819 42 5 22 58 8
SEA 465 76 86 1477 1002 547 6251 1431 173 71.020 640 712 23 8 39 47 9
TEX 376 64 98 1432 690 483 6191 1554 128 62.520 684 749 32 3 24 34 4
TOR 382 78 84 1444 776 493 6141 1428 147 58.240 633 701 41 9 25 38 3

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BAL 2815 7545 5693 1732 120 .980 17549 98 51 0 7
BOS 2517 7445 5434 1864 147 .977 17433 101 55 1.00 16
CAL 2782 7569 5438 2012 119 .956 17568 66 77 1.00 4
CHA 2757 7482 5368 1929 185 .974 17264 102 60 0 13
CLE 2657 7502 5586 1764 152 .972 17622 125 60 0 6
DET 2644 7480 5464 1884 132 .972 17407 84 63 0 15
KCA 2583 7478 5569 1764 145 .953 17173 85 53 0 6
MIN 2550 7292 5571 1598 123 .975 17199 128 57 0 6
ML4 2520 7633 5616 1875 142 .977 17611 121 62 1.00 12
NYA 2622 7427 5536 1744 147 .979 17510 98 44 1.00 15
OAK 2620 7555 5688 1679 188 .961 17465 97 58 0 8
SEA 2700 7458 5480 1820 158 .962 17717 118 51 0 10
TEX 2550 7492 5387 1956 149 .983 17164 93 59 1.00 19
TOR 2826 7389 5433 1797 159 .982 17326 78 46 0 7

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
California Angels 93 69 2807360 1 728
Kansas City Royals 90 72 2284464 2 650
Chicago White Sox 87 75 1567787 3 753
Seattle Mariners 76 86 1070404 4 1002
Oakland Athletics 68 94 1735489 5 697
Texas Rangers 64 98 1154432 6 690
Minnesota Twins 60 102 921186 7 812

Central

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
Milwaukee Brewers 95 67 1978896 1 717
Baltimore Orioles 94 68 1613031 2 719
Boston Red Sox 89 73 1950124 3 816
Detroit Tigers 83 79 1636058 4 740
New York Yankees 79 83 2041219 5 939
Toronto Blue Jays 78 84 1275978 6 776
Cleveland Indians 78 84 1044021 6 882

More From Around the Web

This day in baseball history

October 23

  • 1996

    On October 23, 1996, the New York Yankees come back from a 6 ...

  • 1993

    On October 23, 1993, Joe Carter of the Toronto Blue Jays hit ...

  • 1974

    On October 23, 1974, the Chicago Cubs trade longtime star Bi ...

More Baseball History
Tagged:
1982 ALCS, 1982 World Series, Al Oliver, American League, Baltimore Orioles, Ben Oglivie, Billy Martin, Bob Stanley, Brian Downing, Cal Ripken, Jr., California Angels, Carney Lansford, Cecil Cooper, Dave Hostetler, Dave Stieb, Don Baylor, Doug DeCinces, Eddie Murray, Fred Lynn, Gaylord Perry, Geoff Zahn, George Steinbrenner, Gorman Thomas, Hal McRae, Harvey Kuenn, Jeff Newman, John Wathan, Larry Parrish, Lou DiMuro, Milwaukee Brewers, Paul Molitor, Pete Vuckovich, Reggie Jackson, Rickey Henderson, Robin Yount, Rod Carew, Rollie Fingers, Ted Simmons, Tony Armas, Willie Wilson

Comments

    Be respectful, keep it clean.
Login or register to post comments

Share US

Share |