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Series Wrapup

Story

The Toronto Blue Jays captured their third consecutive A.L. East title in 1993, finishing the regular season with a record of 95-67, seven games ahead of the second-place New York Yankees.  The Baltimore Orioles and Detroit Tigers tied for third in the division, 10 games behind first-place Toronto.

Featuring a solid pitching staff and the league’s second-highest scoring offense, the Blue Jays established themselves as the class of the A.L. East over the course of the campaign.  They placed second in the league with 847 runs scored, topped the circuit with 170 stolen bases, a .279 team batting average, and a .436 team slugging average, and compiled the fifth-best team ERA (4.21).

Pat Hentgen and Juan Guzman served as the team’s top two starters.  Hentgen finished 19-9 with a 3.87 ERA.  Guzman compiled an outstanding 14-3 record and placed among the league leaders with 194 strikeouts.  Reliever Duane Ward posted an ERA of 2.13, struck out 97 batters in 72 innings of work, and led the league with 45 saves.   

On offense, the Blue Jays featured the most balanced attack in the league.  Devon White placed among the A.L. leaders with 116 runs scored, 42 doubles, and 34 stolen bases.  Roberto Alomar hit 17 home runs, drove in 93 runs, and finished near the top of the league rankings with a .326 batting average, 109 runs scored, and 55 stolen bases.  Joe Carter led the team with 33 home runs and 121 runs batted in.  John Olerud hit 24 homers, knocked in 107 runs, scored 109 others, and led the league with a .363 batting average, a .473 on-base percentage, and 54 doubles.  Serving primarily as the team’s designated hitter, Paul Molitor hit 22 home runs, drove in 111 runs, scored another 121, placed second to Olerud in the batting race with a mark of .332, and led the league with 211 hits.  Molitor earned a second-place finish in the A.L. MVP voting, while Olerud finished third in the balloting.  

As impressive a batting order as the Blue Jays presented to opposing pitchers, it was the Detroit Tigers that ended up topping the circuit with 899 runs scored.  Cecil Fielder, Mickey Tettleton, Tony Phillips, and Travis Fryman paced the Tiger attack.  Fielder hit 30 homers and drove in 117 runs.  Tettleton went deep 32 times and knocked in 110 runs.  Phillips batted .313, scored 113 runs, and led the league with 132 bases on balls.  Fryman batted .300, hit 22 homers, knocked in 97 runs, and scored 98 others.  The Tigers might have mounted a more serious challenge to the Blue Jays for the division title had their pitchers not compiled a team ERA of 4.65 that placed them 12th in the league rankings.

The sixth-place Cleveland Indians, who finished 19 games behind Toronto in the East, also featured a potent lineup that included a trio of All-Stars.  Albert Belle hit 38 home runs, batted .290, and topped the circuit with 129 runs batted in.  Kenny Lofton led the league with 70 stolen bases and also placed among the leaders with 116 runs scored and a .325 batting average.  Carlos Baerga hit 21 homers, drove in 114 runs, scored 105 others, batted .321, and collected 200 hits.  

Although the Chicago White Sox lacked the overall offensive firepower of the Blue Jays, Tigers, and Indians, they boasted a superior pitching staff that led the American League with a team ERA of 3.70.  Chicago’s outstanding pitching enabled them to finish first in the West with a record of 94-68, eight games ahead of the second-place Texas Rangers.  Jack McDowell, Alex Fernandez, and Wilson Alvarez gave the White Sox three quality starters.  McDowell earned A.L. Cy Young honors by going 22-10, with a 3.37 ERA, 10 complete games, 257 innings pitched, and a league-leading four shutouts.  Fernandez finished second on the team with 18 wins, a 3.13 ERA, and 247 innings pitched.  Alvarez posted 15 victories and led the staff with a 2.95 ERA.

Although the White Sox finished just seventh in the league with 776 runs scored, their lineup featured arguably the circuit’s finest all-around hitter in Frank Thomas.  The big first baseman earned A.L. MVP honors by hitting 41 homers, driving in 128 runs, scoring 106 others, batting .317, compiling a .426 on-base percentage, and posting a .607 slugging average.  Thomas received a considerable amount of help in Chicago’s batting order from Robin Ventura, Tim Raines, and Lance Johnson.  Ventura finished second on the club with 22 home runs and 94 runs batted in.  Raines batted .306 and stole 21 bases.  Johnson batted .311, stole 35 bases, and led the league with 14 triples.

The White Sox made their ALCS matchup with the Blue Jays a competitive one, scoring only three fewer runs than their Eastern Division counterparts before falling in six games.  Toronto’s potent lineup ended up being too much for Chicago to overcome, as the Blue Jays compiled a .301 team batting average during the Series.  Paul Molitor and Devon White led the charge.  Molitor batted .391, homered once, drove in five runs, and scored seven others.  White collected 12 hits in 27 trips to the plate for a .444 batting average.  Yet, 36-year-old right-hander Dave Stewart walked away with ALCS MVP honors by winning both his starts, posting a 2.03 ERA, and allowing only eight hits in his 13 1/3 innings of work.

The Blue Jays subsequently captured their second straight world championship by defeating the Philadelphia Phillies in the World Series in six games.  The two teams combined to score a total of 81 runs in the high-scoring affair, with Toronto’s come-from-behind 15-14 Game Four victory proving to be the most exciting contest in the Series.  The Fall Classic appropriately ended when Joe Carter delivered a three-run homer in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game Six that gave the Blue Jays an 8-6 Series-clinching win.  Paul Molitor earned Series MVP honors by batting .500, hitting two homers, driving in eight runs, and scoring 10 others.    

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• June 3 – The Seattle Mariners selected Alex Rodriguez with the first pick in the 1993 Major League Baseball Draft.

• June 28 – The Chicago White Sox unceremoniously released Carlton Fisk just six days after the veteran receiver broke Bob Boone’s major league record for most games caught.

• July 28 – Seattle’s Ken Griffey, Jr. tied a record held jointly by Dale Long and Don Mattingly by homering in his eighth consecutive game.

• September 16 - Dave Winfield of the Minnesota Twins recorded his 3,000th career hit.

• California’s Tim Salmon (31 HR, 95 RBIs, .283 batting average) earned A.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Ken Griffey, Jr. hit 45 home runs, knocked in 109 runs, scored 113 others, and batted .309.

• Juan Gonzalez of the Texas Rangers drove in 118 runs, scored 105 others, batted .310, and led the American League with 46 home runs and a .632 slugging average.  

• Ranger teammate Rafael Palmeiro hit 37 homers, knocked in 105 runs, batted .295, and led the league with 124 runs scored.

• Carlos Baerga became the first second baseman ever to collect 200 or more hits, 20 or more homers, and 100 or more RBIs two seasons in a row.

• Reggie Jackson was inducted into the Hall of Fame.

• Seattle's Randy Johnson led the major leagues with 308 strikeouts.

• Kansas City’s Kevin Appier led all A.L. hurlers with a 2.56 ERA.

• The Indians played their final game in Cleveland Stadium, the Tribe's home since 1932.

• Two Cleveland relievers, Tim Crews and Steve Olin, lost their lives in a preseason boating accident.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BAL 2127 5508 786 1470 744 .229 287 24 157 73 54 2276 .376 .360 .752 131 56 49
BOS 2383 5496 686 1451 644 .232 319 29 114 73 38 2170 .331 .338 .670 146 49 80
CAL 2186 5391 684 1399 644 .243 259 24 114 169 100 2048 .401 .341 .743 129 46 50
CHA 2177 5483 776 1454 731 .223 228 44 162 106 57 2256 .328 .322 .666 126 61 72
CLE 2353 5619 790 1547 747 .269 264 31 141 159 55 2296 .367 .410 .778 131 72 39
DET 2238 5620 899 1546 853 .267 282 38 178 104 63 2438 .391 .410 .802 101 52 33
KCA 2188 5522 675 1455 641 .241 294 35 125 100 75 2194 .341 .350 .691 107 51 48
MIN 2260 5601 693 1480 642 .235 261 27 121 83 59 2158 .364 .337 .702 150 37 27
ML4 2232 5525 733 1426 688 .276 240 25 125 138 93 2091 .388 .371 .777 117 45 57
NYA 2218 5615 821 1568 793 .246 294 24 178 39 35 2444 .369 .400 .770 149 50 22
OAK 2260 5543 715 1408 679 .242 260 21 158 131 59 2184 .356 .379 .736 125 49 46
SEA 2270 5494 734 1429 681 .224 272 24 161 91 68 2232 .342 .343 .700 132 51 63
TEX 2259 5510 835 1472 780 .254 284 39 181 113 67 2377 .349 .379 .745 111 56 69
TOR 2109 5579 847 1556 796 .227 317 42 159 170 49 2434 .389 .341 .747 138 54 46

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BAL 491 85 77 1443 900 579 6183 1427 153 74.950 693 745 21 6 42 41 2
BOS 551 80 82 1453 997 552 6201 1379 127 63.720 614 698 9 5 44 42 11
CAL 482 71 91 1429 843 550 6203 1482 153 113.990 693 770 26 3 41 55 7
CHA 484 94 68 1455 974 566 6173 1398 125 81.710 601 664 16 7 48 51 7
CLE 572 76 86 1445 888 591 6384 1591 182 124.780 735 813 7 1 45 41 5
DET 537 85 77 1439 828 542 6308 1547 188 119.310 751 837 11 5 36 68 5
KCA 465 84 78 1445 985 571 6145 1379 105 123.520 649 694 16 3 48 76 7
MIN 518 71 91 1444 901 514 6286 1591 148 76.380 759 830 5 1 44 43 13
ML4 515 69 93 1447 810 522 6285 1511 153 81.570 718 792 26 2 29 45 7
NYA 494 88 74 1438 899 552 6200 1467 170 122.430 698 761 11 4 38 33 5
OAK 586 68 94 1455 864 680 6456 1551 157 104.280 791 846 8 1 42 39 6
SEA 515 82 80 1453 1083 605 6254 1421 135 129.140 679 731 22 5 41 57 6
TEX 521 86 76 1437 957 562 6232 1476 144 109.080 684 751 20 3 45 52 14
TOR 506 95 67 1444 1023 620 6269 1441 134 64.460 676 742 11 4 50 83 8

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BAL 2632 7378 5437 1825 116 .967 17314 96 64 0 6
BOS 2880 7297 5442 1720 135 .971 17427 92 44 0 11
CAL 2670 7378 5497 1737 144 .978 17161 122 52 0 10
CHA 2730 7351 5531 1691 129 .954 17450 82 82 2.00 15
CLE 2820 7421 5535 1712 174 .961 17348 113 68 0 9
DET 2802 7448 5480 1807 161 .949 17242 102 57 0 8
KCA 2709 7270 5418 1735 117 .974 17340 119 71 0 15
MIN 2752 7355 5443 1793 119 .974 17330 137 66 0 21
ML4 2793 7401 5592 1660 149 .966 17364 115 51 1.00 12
NYA 2791 7366 5328 1913 125 .951 17262 115 47 0 7
OAK 2816 7407 5621 1653 133 .979 17434 120 71 1.00 15
SEA 2797 7210 5343 1760 107 .972 17442 105 68 1.00 13
TEX 2810 7358 5393 1810 155 .958 17261 95 67 1.00 18
TOR 2625 7131 5402 1603 126 .973 17299 136 64 0 6

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
Chicago White Sox 94 68 2581091 1 974
Texas Rangers 86 76 2244616 2 957
Kansas City Royals 84 78 1934578 3 985
Seattle Mariners 82 80 2052638 4 1083
Minnesota Twins 71 91 2048673 5 901
California Angels 71 91 2057460 5 843
Oakland Athletics 68 94 2035025 7 864

Central

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
Toronto Blue Jays 95 67 4057947 1 1023
New York Yankees 88 74 2416942 2 899
Detroit Tigers 85 77 1971421 3 828
Baltimore Orioles 85 77 3644965 3 900
Boston Red Sox 80 82 2422021 5 997
Cleveland Indians 76 86 2177908 6 888
Milwaukee Brewers 69 93 1688080 7 810

Awards

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Tagged:
1993 ALCS, 1993 World Series, Albert Belle, Alex Fernandez, Alex Rodriguez, American League, Carlos Baerga, Carlton Fisk, Cecil Fielder, Chicago White Sox, Dave Stewart, Dave Winfield, Devon White, Duane Ward, Frank Thomas, Jack McDowell, Joe Carter, John Olerud, Juan Gonzalez, Juan Guzman, Ken Griffey, Jr., Kenny Lofton, Kevin Appier, Lance Johnson, Mickey Tettleton, Pat Hentgen, Paul Molitor, Rafael Palmeiro, Randy Johnson, Rickey Henderson, Roberto Alomar, Robin Ventura, Steve Olin, Tim Crews, Tim Raines, Tim Salmon, Tony Phillips, Toronto Blue Jays, Travis Fryman, Wilson Alvarez

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