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West Division

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East Division

Series Wrapup

Story

After failing to become just the third team in major league history to win four consecutive world championships the previous year by losing the World Series to the Arizona Diamondbacks, the New York Yankees captured their fifth straight A.L. East title in 2002.  The Yankees concluded the campaign with a major-league best 103-58 record that left them 10 ½ games ahead of the second-place Boston Red Sox in the division.
 
Buoyed by the off-season free-agent acquisition of slugging first baseman Jason Giambi and the further maturation of sophomore second baseman Alfonso Soriano, New York led the American League with 897 runs scored and placed second in the junior circuit with 223 home runs.  Giambi finished first on the team with 41 home runs and 122 runs batted in, scored 120 runs, and batted .314.  Soriano earned a third-place finish in the A.L. MVP voting by hitting 39 homers, driving in 102 runs, batting .300, amassing 51 doubles, accumulating 381 total bases, and leading the league with 128 runs scored, 209 hits, and 41 stolen bases.  Jorge Posada added 20 homers and 99 runs batted in, while Derek Jeter scored 124 times, batted .297, and stole 32 bases.  Bernie Williams also made significant contributions on offense, driving in 102 runs, scoring 102 others, collecting 204 hits, and finishing third in the league with a .333 batting average.  New York also had a deep starting rotation that included 19-game winner David Wells, 18-game winner Mike Mussina, and fellow 13-game winners Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte.    

Although the Red Sox’s 93 victories weren’t enough to get them into the playoffs, they also had a very solid team, finishing second in the league with 859 runs scored and compiling a team ERA of 3.75 that placed them third in the league rankings.  Derek Lowe and Pedro Martinez anchored Boston’s starting rotation.  Lowe finished 21-8 with a 2.58 ERA, while Martinez compiled a record of 20-4 and led all A.L. hurlers with a 2.26 ERA and 239 strikeouts.  Meanwhile, Nomar Garciaparra and Manny Ramirez paced the Red Sox on offense.  Garciaparra hit 24 homers, knocked in 120 runs, scored 101 others, and batted .310.  Ramirez went deep 33 times, drove in 107 runs, and led the league with a .349 batting average and a .450 on-base percentage.

The Minnesota Twins surprised everyone by winning their first A.L. Central title, replacing Cleveland at the top of the division standings by finishing the regular season with a record of 94-67.  The Chicago White Sox finished second, 13 ½ games back, while the Indians came in third, 20 ½ games off the pace.  The Twins got fine seasons from pitchers Rick Reed and Eric Milton.  Reed led the staff with 15 victories, while Milton added another 13 wins.  Reliever Eddie Guardado led the league with 45 saves.  On offense, Jacque Jones hit 27 homers, drove in 85 runs, scored 96 others, and batted .300.  Torii Hunter scored 89 runs, batted .289, led the team with 29 home runs and 94 runs batted in, and earned a Gold Glove for his outstanding centerfield play.

The runner-up White Sox had the division's best player in Magglio Ordonez.  The Chicago right fielder hit 38 home runs, drove in 135 runs, scored 116 others, and batted .320.  The Indians also featured one of the division’s top performers in Jim Thome, who finished second in the league with 52 homers, knocked in 118 runs, batted .304, and topped the circuit with a .677 slugging average.

The A.L. West ended up being the league’s strongest and most competitive division, with three teams posting more than 90 victories.  The Oakland Athletics edged out the Anaheim Angels for the top spot, finishing four games ahead of them with a record of 103-59.  Anaheim gained a postseason berth as the circuit’s wild-card entry with a mark of 99-63.  The Seattle Mariners finished third in the division, 10 games behind the first-place Athletics, with a record of 93-69.  Although the Texas Rangers finished last in the division, 31 games off the pace, they featured arguably the league’s finest all-around player in Alex Rodriguez.  A-Rod batted .300, scored 125 runs, and topped the circuit with 57 home runs, 142 runs batted in, and 389 total bases.  He placed second in the league MVP balloting.
 
Even though they won 23 fewer games than they did one year earlier when they established a new A.L. record by posting 116 victories, the Mariners played good ball over the course of the season.  Both Ichiro Suzuki and Bret Boone had big years once again.  Ichiro batted .321 and placed among the league leaders with 111 runs scored, 208 hits, and 31 stolen bases.  Boone homered 24 times and drove in 107 runs.  John Olerud also performed well for the Mariners, hitting 22 homers, knocking in 102 runs, and batting .300.

The runner-up Angels had one of the league's top starters in Jarrod Washburn, and they also boasted the circuit's top closer in Troy Percival.  Washburn compiled a record of 18-6 and a 3.15 ERA.  Percival finished 4-1, with a 1.92 ERA and 40 saves.  He also struck out 68 batters in 56 innings of work.  On offense, Darin Erstad batted .283 and scored 99 runs.  Shortstop David Eckstein batted .293 and scored 107 times.  Tim Salmon homered 22 times, drove in 88 runs, and batted .286.  Troy Glaus hit 30 homers, knocked in 111 runs, and scored 99 others.  Garret Anderson earned a top-five finish in the A.L. MVP balloting by hitting 29 home runs, driving in 123 runs, scoring 93 others, batting .306, and leading the league with 56 doubles.  

The Oakland Athletics rivaled the Yankees as the American League’s strongest team over the course of the regular season, finishing just ½- game behind them in the race for the league’s best record.  The loss of Jason Giambi to New York via free agency hurt the A’s offense considerably, since they finished just eighth in the league in runs scored.  Nevertheless, they managed to win their division largely on the strength of their outstanding starting pitching.  Barry Zito, Mark Mulder, and Tim Hudson gave the A’s a formidable “Big Three” at the top of their rotation.  Zito earned A.L. Cy Young honors by compiling a brilliant 23-5 record that made him the circuit’s top winner.  He also posted an exceptional 2.75 ERA and struck out 182 batters.  Mulder finished 19-7 with a 3.47 ERA, and Hudson went 15-9 with a 2.98 earned run average.  Hardly bereft of talent on offense, Oakland also received strong performances from outfielder Jermaine Dye, third baseman Eric Chavez, and shortstop Miguel Tejada.  Dye hit 24 home runs and drove in 86 runs.  Chavez homered 34 times and knocked in 109 runs.  Tejada earned A.L. MVP honors by hitting 34 home runs, driving in 131 runs, scoring 108 others, batting .308, and collecting 204 hits.  He solidified his MVP candidacy by batting .359, hitting five home runs, and driving in 17 runs during the month of September.   

In spite of their outstanding regular season, the A’s made an early exit from the postseason tournament, losing their Division Series matchup with the Twins in five games.  Meanwhile, the Angels upset the favored Yankees in the other first-round playoff series, needing only four games to dispose of the four-time defending league champions.  Anaheim scored 31 runs and compiled a .376 team batting average over the course of the four contests.

The Angels subsequently handled the Twins rather easily in the ALCS, defeating them in five games and outscoring them by a combined margin of 29-12.  Anaheim’s Adam Kennedy earned ALCS MVP honors by batting .357 and hitting three home runs during the Angels’ 13-5 Series-clinching victory in Game Five.

The Angels had a much harder time with the San Francisco Giants in the World Series, falling behind their National League counterparts three-games-to-two before mounting a momentous comeback.  Trailing the Giants 5-0 in the bottom of the seventh inning of Game Six, the Angels closed the gap to 5-3 on a two-out, three-run homer by Scott Spiezio.  They then rallied for another three runs in the bottom of the eighth on a home run by Darin Erstad and a two-run double by Troy Glaus, to pull the game out, 6-5.  With momentum clearly on their side, the Angels captured their first world championship in their 42-year history by winning Game Seven by a score of 4-1.

Other notable events from around the league and players who distinguished themselves over the course of the season included:

• February 27 - The sale of the Boston Red Sox to a group headed by John Henry became official.

• March 1 - The Red Sox fired GM Dan Duquette and hired Mike Port on an interim basis.

• March 11 - The Red Sox hired Grady Little as their new manager.

• April 29 - Former major league outfielder Darryl Strawberry was sentenced to 18 months in prison for violating the terms of his probation six times.

• May 11 - Rafael Palmeiro hit his 500th career home run against David Elder of the Cleveland Indians.

• August 7 - In a historic movement, major league players ended their long-held opposition to mandatory drug testing by agreeing to be tested for illegal steroids beginning in 2003.

• September 4 - The Oakland Athletics set an AL record by defeating the Kansas City Royals 12–11 for their 20th straight win.

• September 5 – Alex Rodriguez became the fifth player in major league history to record successive 50-home run seasons during an 11-2 Texas victory over Baltimore.

• September 20 – Baltimore’s Mike Bordick set a major league record with his 102nd consecutive errorless game at shortstop.  He also extended his major league mark of errorless chances at shortstop to 504.

• October 28 - Lou Piniella asked to be released from his managerial contract with the Seattle Mariners so that he could sign with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.

• November 25 - The Boston Red Sox signed 28-year–old Theo Epstein as their new general manager.  He became the youngest GM in major league history.

• Toronto third baseman Eric Hinske (24 home runs and a .279 batting average) earned A.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Boston’s Derek Lowe tossed a no-hitter.

• Seattle’s Mike Cameron hit four home runs in a game on May 2.

• The All-Star Game ended in a 7-7 tie when both teams ran out of pitchers.

• The players and owners averted an imminent work stoppage by agreeing to a contract on August 31.

• The Hall of Fame inducted Ozzie Smith.

• Legendary slugger Ted Williams died on July 5 at age 83.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ANA 2307 5678 851 1603 811 .233 333 32 152 117 51 2456 .358 .332 .767 105 64 49
BAL 2217 5491 667 1353 636 .181 311 27 165 110 48 2213 .313 .271 .660 128 49 40
BOS 2172 5640 859 1560 810 .203 348 33 177 80 28 2505 .383 .320 .777 139 53 22
CHA 2207 5502 856 1475 819 .205 289 29 217 75 31 2473 .356 .325 .758 111 53 48
CLE 2236 5423 739 1349 706 .191 255 26 192 52 37 2232 .325 .295 .660 149 39 39
DET 2097 5406 575 1340 546 .215 265 37 124 65 44 2051 .306 .322 .650 125 57 30
KCA 2248 5535 737 1415 695 .209 285 42 140 140 65 2204 .360 .299 .690 106 51 44
MIN 2290 5582 768 1518 731 .238 348 36 167 79 62 2439 .342 .343 .725 121 52 34
NYA 2135 5601 897 1540 857 .205 314 12 223 100 38 2547 .355 .320 .773 150 41 23
OAK 2312 5558 800 1450 772 .217 279 28 205 46 20 2400 .404 .349 .810 128 36 20
SEA 2251 5569 814 1531 771 .273 285 31 152 137 58 2334 .388 .386 .807 123 72 41
TBA 2007 5604 673 1418 640 .192 297 35 133 102 45 2184 .325 .278 .680 116 36 44
TEX 2389 5618 843 1510 806 .220 304 27 230 62 34 2558 .395 .345 .791 129 50 48
TOR 2236 5581 813 1457 771 .224 305 38 187 71 18 2399 .348 .326 .731 130 57 17

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ANA 562 99 63 1451 999 509 6097 1345 169 61.660 595 644 7 2 54 52 7
BAL 569 67 95 1452 967 549 6258 1491 208 109.750 719 773 8 1 31 54 1
BOS 500 93 69 1444 1157 430 6049 1339 146 79.880 603 665 5 3 51 31 6
CHA 585 81 81 1424 945 528 6131 1422 190 80.390 723 798 7 4 35 54 6
CLE 583 74 88 1421 1058 603 6271 1508 142 162.650 777 837 9 2 34 52 8
DET 533 55 106 1417 794 463 6215 1593 163 218.890 776 864 11 4 33 59 8
KCA 583 62 100 1440 909 572 6386 1587 212 167.520 835 891 12 4 30 68 6
MIN 596 94 67 1445 1026 439 6133 1454 184 107.060 662 712 8 5 47 62 3
NYA 495 103 58 1452 1135 403 6159 1441 144 85.820 627 697 9 5 53 59 2
OAK 570 103 59 1451 1021 474 6158 1391 135 70.880 595 654 9 5 48 40 9
SEA 505 93 69 1445 1063 441 6117 1422 178 113.980 654 699 8 3 43 42 3
TBA 467 55 106 1440 925 620 6424 1567 215 137.080 847 918 12 1 25 62 10
TEX 649 72 90 1441 1030 669 6446 1528 194 172.420 826 882 4 2 33 84 11
TOR 623 78 84 1435 991 590 6338 1504 177 147.110 768 828 6 2 41 57 4

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ANA 2843 7234 5539 1599 96 .957 17427 78 51 1.00 7
BAL 2701 7278 5421 1747 110 .978 17411 103 44 1.00 22
BOS 2650 7119 5321 1675 123 .954 17348 118 50 0 20
CHA 2730 7078 5350 1622 106 .980 17074 99 38 1.00 9
CLE 2760 7151 5328 1692 131 .972 17095 126 59 0 15
DET 2603 7337 5392 1770 175 .965 16970 72 34 1.00 23
KCA 2740 7315 5420 1744 151 .957 17291 90 36 0 8
MIN 2805 7070 5536 1449 85 .984 17336 57 27 0 5
NYA 2661 7072 5387 1541 144 .972 17427 92 39 0 10
OAK 2879 7265 5332 1812 121 .982 17423 68 46 0 9
SEA 2827 7154 5508 1538 108 .957 17341 66 35 0 7
TBA 2485 7288 5536 1608 144 .961 17282 92 53 0 13
TEX 2982 7214 5385 1712 117 .974 17283 74 28 0 11
TOR 2702 7166 5403 1647 116 .984 17257 107 41 0 18

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
Oakland Athletics 103 59 2169811 1 1021
Anaheim Angels 99 63 2305547 2 999
Seattle Mariners 93 69 3542938 3 1063
Texas Rangers 72 90 2352397 4 1030

Central

team W L Att Rk SOP
Minnesota Twins 94 67 1924473 1 1026
Chicago White Sox 81 81 1676911 2 945
Cleveland Indians 74 88 2616940 3 1058
Kansas City Royals 62 100 1323036 4 909
Detroit Tigers 55 106 1503623 5 794

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
New York Yankees 103 58 3465807 1 1135
Boston Red Sox 93 69 2650862 2 1157
Toronto Blue Jays 78 84 1637900 3 991
Baltimore Orioles 67 95 2682439 4 967
Tampa Bay Devil Rays 55 106 1065742 5 925

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Tagged:
Alex Rodriguez, Alfonso Soriano, Anaheim Angels, Andy Pettitte, Barry Zito, Bernie Williams (New York Yankees), Boston Red Sox, Bret Boone, Cleveland Indians, Darin Erstad, David Eckstein, David Wells, Derek Jeter, Derek Lowe, Eddie Guardado, Eric Chavez, Eric Hinske, Eric Milton, Garret Anderson, Ichiro Suzuki, Jacque Jones, Jarrod Washburn, Jason Giambi, Jermaine Dye, Jim Thome, Jorge Posada, Lou Piniella, Magglio Ordonez, Manny Ramirez, Mariano Rivera, Mark Mulder, Miguel Tejada, Mike Bordick, Mike Mussina, Minnesota Twins, New York Yankees, Nomar Garciaparra, Oakland Athletics, Pedro Martinez, Rafael Palmeiro, Rick Reed, Roger Clemens, Scott Spiezio, Ted Williams, Theo Epstein, Tim Hudson, Tim Salmon, Torii Hunter, Troy Glaus, Troy Percival

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