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Series Wrapup

Story

With Navin Field and Fenway Park opening in the American League in 1912, the National League’s Cincinnati Reds opened the gates to Redland Field, which later became known as Crosley Field.  Meanwhile, as the composite batting average in the senior circuit soared to .272, Pittsburgh outfielder Owen Wilson established an all-time major-league record by accumulating 36 triples.

The New York Giants were the National League’s top offensive team, scoring a league-leading 823 runs while also topping the circuit with 319 stolen bases.  Since the Giants also led the league with a team ERA of 2.58, it should come as no surprise that they had little difficulty repeating as N.L. champions.  New York finished the campaign with a record of 103-48, 10 full games ahead of the second-place Pittsburgh Pirates.

New York’s first-place finish enabled Giants second baseman Larry Doyle to walk away with the Chalmers Trophy as the circuit’s most valuable player.  Doyle hit 10 home runs, drove in 90 runs, scored 98 others, and finished among the league leaders with a .330 batting average.  Yet, third baseman Heinie Zimmerman of the third-place Cubs, who finished 11 ½ games behind the Giants, posted superior numbers to Doyle in most offensive categories.  Zimmerman led the league with 14 home runs, a .372 batting average, 41 doubles, 207 hits, and a .571 slugging percentage, and he also placed among the leaders with 99 runs batted in and 95 runs scored.  For some reason, though, Zimmerman finished just sixth in the Chalmers voting.

Heading New York’s pitching staff was the trio of Christy Mathewson, Rube Marquard, and Jeff Tesreau.  Mathewson finished 23-12 with a 2.12 ERA.  Rookie Tesreau won 17 games and took the ERA title with a mark of 1.96.  Marquard led the league with 26 victories, 19 of which came in succession between April 11 and July 3.       

The Giants subsequently faced the Boston Red Sox in a World Series considered by most baseball historians to be one of the most exciting ever.  Although the Giants lost the Series in eight games (one of the contests ended in a tie due to darkness), they entered the bottom of the 10th inning of the final contest leading by a run.  At that juncture, New York centerfielder Fred Snodgrass dropped a fly ball that allowed the tying and winning runs to score.  Since the winner’s share of the World Series money in 1912 was $30,000, Snodgrass’ error became known as the “$30,000 Muff.”

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

Buck Herzog of the Giants established a new World Series record by accumulating 12 hits against Boston pitching.

• Despite allowing only four earned runs in 28 2/3 innings in the World Series, New York's Christy Mathewson lost his two decisions.

• Rube Marquard’s 19 consecutive wins tied a major league record previously set by 19th century hurler Tim Keefe.

• The National League’s Boston franchise was referred to as the "Braves" for the first time.

• New York’s Jeff Tesreau threw a no-hitter against the Phillies on September 6.

• 38-year-old Honus Wagner batted .324 and led the National League with 102 runs batted in, en route to earning a second-place finish in the Chalmers voting.

• Phillies owner Horace Fogel was barred from the major leagues for accusing the Giants and Cardinals of conspiring to throw the pennant.

• Christy Mathewson became the eighth pitcher to record 300 career wins.

• Brooklyn Superbas outfielder Casey Stengel made an impressive major league debut against the Pittsburgh Pirates on September 17, collecting four hits, two RBIs, and two stolen bases in Brooklyn’s 7-3 win.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BRO 1617 5141 651 1377 561 .214 220 73 32 179 1839 .329 .281 .642 159
BSN 1629 5361 693 1465 605 .220 227 68 35 137 0 1933 .346 .274 .666 0 0 168
CHN 1643 5048 756 1398 639 .230 245 91 42 164 0 1951 .390 .321 .738 0 0 182
CIN 1664 5115 656 1310 565 .209 183 89 21 248 0 1734 .339 .269 .658 0 0 175
NY1 1699 5067 823 1451 702 .270 231 89 47 319 0 2001 .388 .354 .773 0 0 152
PHI 1639 5077 670 1354 570 .213 244 68 43 159 0 1863 .305 .285 .607 0 0 179
PIT 1608 5252 751 1493 657 .232 222 129 39 177 0 2090 .330 .304 .655 0 0 181
SLN 1705 5092 659 1366 561 .195 190 77 27 193 0 1791 .315 .242 .596 0 0 166

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BRO 252 58 95 1357 553 510 5842 1399 45 78.800 549 744 71 10 8 24 2
BSN 249 52 101 1390 542 521 6064 1544 43 99.580 642 869 88 3 5 48 5
CHN 256 91 59 1360 554 493 5731 1307 33 96.770 517 668 80 14 9 34 2
CIN 244 75 78 1380 560 452 5908 1455 28 117.850 524 724 86 12 10 30 2
NY1 230 103 48 1370 652 338 5710 1352 36 71.130 393 571 93 7 15 31 0
PHI 251 73 79 1354 616 515 5778 1381 43 71.400 489 689 81 10 9 36 2
PIT 228 93 58 1385 664 497 5746 1268 28 38.920 439 565 94 18 7 17 3
SLN 287 63 90 1353 487 560 5916 1466 31 104.420 579 825 61 6 12 32 3

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BRO 1521 6236 4039 1942 255 .932 0 0 0 0 12
BSN 1543 6426 4134 1996 296 .919 0 0 0 0 21
CHN 1545 6291 4055 1987 249 .928 0 0 0 0 11
CIN 1547 6249 4112 1890 247 .932 0 0 0 0 6
NY1 1601 6314 4100 1934 280 .914 0 0 0 0 18
PHI 1533 6239 4059 1949 231 .933 0 0 0 0 25
PIT 1500 6145 4144 1832 169 .962 0 0 0 0 21
SLN 1559 6387 4068 2045 274 .934 0 0 0 0 9

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1912 World Series, Buck Herzog, Casey Stengel, Christy Mathewson, Crosley Field, Fred Snodgrass, Heinie Zimmerman, Honus Wagner, Horace Fogel, Jeff Tesreau, Larry Doyle, New York Giants, Owen Wilson, Rube Marquard

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