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Series Wrapup

Story

With Brooklyn’s Ebbets Field opening its gates for the first time in 1913, the crosstown New York Giants captured their third straight National League pennant.  The Giants finished the regular season with a record of 101-51, 12 ½ games ahead of the second-place Philadelphia Phillies.  

John McGraw’s team featured a typical combination of outstanding pitching and an overachieving lineup that placed among the league leaders in runs scored even though it lacked a true star.  Christy Mathewson headed New York’s pitching staff, finishing the year with a record of 25-11, 306 innings pitched, 25 complete games, and a league-leading 2.06 earned run average.  Rube Marquard compiled a record of 23-10, while Jeff Tesreau finished 22-13 and placed third in the league with an ERA of 2.17.  Outfielder George Burns and second baseman Larry Doyle paced the Giants on offense.  Burns finished among the league leaders with 37 doubles and 173 hits, while Doyle placed near the top of the league rankings with 38 stolen bases.  

The Giants faced the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series for the second time in three years and once again came up short against Connie Mack’s crew, dropping the Fall Classic in five games.  Philadelphia’s pitching staff held New York’s lineup to a team batting average of just .201, sending the Giants down to their third straight World Series defeat.  The Detroit Tigers of 1907-1909 remain the only other team to lose three consecutive Fall Classics.

Although the Giants won the N.L. pennant, the senior circuit’s top offensive performer played for the second-place Phillies.  Outfielder Gavvy Cravath led the league with 19 home runs, 128 runs batted in, 179 hits, and a .568 slugging percentage, and he finished second in the loop with a .341 batting average.  Yet, for some reason, the writers placed Cravath second in the Chalmers Award voting to Brooklyn first baseman Jake Daubert, who led the league with a .350 batting average but posted mediocre numbers in virtually every other offensive category.  Making the selection even more dubious was the fact that Brooklyn finished four places and 22 games behind Cravath’s Phillies in the N.L. standings.      

Pitching also figured prominently in Philadelphia’s rise to second-place in the standings.  Tom Seaton led the National League with 27 wins while posting a 2.60 ERA.  Grover Cleveland "Pete" Alexander went 22-8 with a 2.79 ERA.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• Christy Mathewson's shutout win in Game Two of the World Series gave the Giants their only win in the Fall Classic.

• Mathewson hurled a National League record 68 consecutive innings without giving up a walk.  He ended up leading the major leagues in fewest walks per nine innings – an incredible mark of 0.62.

• New manager George Stallings lifted the Braves to fifth place, their highest finish since 1902.

Honus Wagner batted exactly .300, posting in the process the last .300 batting average of his illustrious career.

• Philadelphia’s Doc Miller established a new major league record by collecting 20 pinch hits.

• Philadelphia’s Gavvy Cravath, Fred Luderus, and Sherry Magee finished first, second, and fourth in the National League in home runs.

• The Chicago Cubs sent Hall of Fame shortstop Joe Tinker to the Cincinnati Reds.  Tinker subsequently became Cincinnati's manager.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BRO 1682 5165 595 1394 502 .198 193 86 39 188 1876 .303 .250 .589 147
BSN 1709 5145 641 1318 533 .213 191 60 32 177 1725 .347 .265 .639 169
CHN 1708 5022 720 1289 617 .194 195 96 59 181 1853 .325 .261 .609 158
CIN 1744 5132 607 1339 541 .200 170 96 27 226 0 1782 .316 .254 .622 0 0 162
NY1 1743 5218 684 1427 580 .236 226 71 31 296 0 1888 .327 .319 .658 112
PHI 1828 5400 693 1433 597 .217 257 78 73 156 0 2065 .339 .297 .685 0 0 183
PIT 1749 5252 673 1383 570 .202 210 86 35 181 0 1870 .326 .264 .623 0 0 152
SLN 1688 4967 528 1229 427 .174 152 72 15 171 0 1570 .294 .230 .575 0 0 156

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BRO 256 65 84 1374 548 439 5678 1287 33 42.420 477 613 71 9 7 24 3
BSN 218 69 82 1372 597 419 5728 1343 37 50.660 487 690 105 13 3 32 6
CHN 244 88 65 1372 556 478 5780 1330 39 49.950 478 640 89 12 15 43 1
CIN 269 64 89 1379 522 456 5810 1398 40 214.910 530 717 71 10 10 36 7
NY1 250 101 51 1422 651 315 5696 1276 38 33.330 383 515 82 11 17 21 2
PHI 290 88 63 1455 667 512 6096 1407 40 63.680 510 636 77 18 11 29 2
PIT 264 78 71 1400 590 434 5798 1344 26 47.020 451 585 74 9 7 28 1
SLN 266 51 99 1352 465 477 5796 1426 57 135.620 636 756 74 6 11 24 5

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BRO 1544 6241 4105 1893 243 .950 0 0 0 0 13
BSN 1566 6376 4110 1993 273 .922 0 0 0 0 11
CHN 1601 6379 4115 2004 260 .952 0 0 0 0 15
CIN 1616 6422 4116 2055 251 .933 0 0 0 0 14
NY1 1611 6428 4236 1938 254 .964 0 0 0 0 14
PHI 1672 6654 4360 2081 213 .922 0 0 0 0 13
PIT 1587 6273 4196 1851 226 .924 0 0 0 0 14
SLN 1579 6334 4058 2057 219 .934 0 0 0 0 15

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1913 World Series, Christy Mathewson, Doc Miller, Ebbets Field, Fred Luderus, Gavvy Cravath, George Burns, George Stallings, Honus Wagner, Jake Daubert, Jeff Tesreau, Joe Tinker, John McGraw, Larry Doyle, New York Giants, Pete Alexander, Philadelphia Athletics, Rube Marquard, Sherry Magee, Tom Seaton

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