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Series Wrapup

Story

After the “Miracle Braves” stunned everyone by capturing the National League pennant the previous year, the Philadelphia Phillies provided a similar surprise in 1915 by finishing first in the senior circuit.  Improving their position in the standings five places from one year earlier, the Phillies finished seven games ahead of the second-place Braves with a record of 90-62.

The Phillies’ league-leading offense enabled them to fend off an early-season charge by the Chicago Cubs, before holding off a late-season surge by the Braves.  First baseman Fred Luderus and slugging outfielder Gavvy Cravath paced Philadelphia on offense.  Luderus finished second in the league with 36 doubles and a .315 batting average.  Cravath established a new 20th-century major-league record by hitting 24 home runs.  He also topped the circuit with 115 runs batted in, 89 runs scored, 86 bases on balls, and a .393 on-base percentage.

Meanwhile, Grover Cleveland Alexander anchored the league’s best pitching staff.  Beginning a three-year reign as baseball’s top hurler, Alexander led all N.L. pitchers in every major statistical category, finishing 31-10, with a 1.22 earned run average, 241 strikeouts, 12 shutouts, 376 innings pitched, and 36 complete games.  The Phillies also received significant contributions from Al Demaree, Eppa Rixey, and 21-game winner Erskine Mayer, en route to posting a league-leading 2.17 team ERA.   

Nevertheless, it was Boston’s pitching staff that proved to be superior in the World Series, as Red Sox hurlers held Philadelphia’s lineup to a mere .182 batting average.  Gavvy Cravath collected only two hits, while Red Sox right-fielder Harry Hooper batted .350, to lead the Red Sox to their third World Series title with a five-game victory over the Phillies.  Philadelphia’s lone victory came in Game One, with Alexander on the mound.  

While Philadelphia ascended to the top of the National League standings, the New York Giants fell to the depths of the senior circuit.  After winning three of the previous four league championships, the Giants finished last in the N.L. with a record of only 69-83.  An aging and ineffective pitching staff proved to be the bane of manager John McGraw’s existence, with New York hurlers surrendering a National League high 628 runs to the opposition.  The team’s only bright spot was second baseman Larry Doyle, who topped the circuit with a .320 batting average, 189 hits, and 40 doubles.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

Rube Marquard of the Giants threw a no-hitter against Brooklyn on April 15.

• Jimmy Lavender of Chicago tossed a no-hitter versus the Giants on August 31.

• The Cardinals led the National League with 590 runs scored – the fewest ever posted by a loop leader.

Braves Field opened on August 18, replacing South End Grounds as the home of the Boston Braves.  South End Grounds had been in existence as a Major League park since 1876.

• The Giants acquired third baseman Hans Lobert from Philadelphia for three players prior to the start of the 1915 campaign.  Lobert was generally acknowledged to be the National League’s fastest player.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BRO 1621 5120 536 1268 449 .176 165 75 14 131 126 1625 .268 .217 .517 0 0 175
BSN 1719 5070 582 1219 496 .199 231 57 17 121 98 1615 .311 .272 .611 0 0 194
CHN 1705 5114 570 1246 485 .205 212 66 53 166 124 1749 .361 .257 .656 0 0 182
CIN 1779 5231 516 1323 425 .223 194 84 15 156 142 1730 .297 .288 .595 0 0 192
NY1 1726 5218 582 1312 501 .206 195 68 24 155 137 1715 .279 .264 .551 122
PHI 1613 4916 589 1216 486 .185 202 39 58 121 113 1670 .293 .241 .557 181
PIT 1678 5113 557 1259 464 .184 197 91 24 182 111 1710 .287 .255 .587 162
SLN 1710 5106 590 1297 483 .219 159 92 20 162 144 1700 .347 .267 .615 175

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BRO 245 80 72 1392 499 473 5814 1252 29 56.640 410 560 87 16 8 31 3
BSN 235 83 69 1405 630 366 5652 1257 23 40.130 402 545 95 15 13 27 1
CHN 275 73 80 1399 657 480 5867 1272 28 40.150 484 622 71 18 8 40 0
CIN 273 71 83 1433 572 497 5943 1304 28 57.150 452 585 80 19 12 24 1
NY1 260 69 83 1385 637 325 5736 1350 40 41.090 479 628 78 15 9 32 0
PHI 220 90 62 1375 652 342 5478 1161 26 21.490 332 463 98 20 8 20 4
PIT 247 73 81 1381 544 384 5594 1229 21 34.600 398 520 91 18 11 15 0
SLN 260 72 81 1399 538 402 5797 1320 30 27.210 446 601 79 13 9 20 5

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BRO 1539 6362 4160 1964 238 .951 0 0 0 0 18
BSN 1614 6356 4204 1939 213 .939 0 0 0 0 7
CHN 1593 6439 4185 1986 268 .919 0 0 0 0 18
CIN 1641 6628 4294 2110 224 .933 0 0 0 0 12
NY1 1585 6381 4156 1969 256 .944 0 0 0 0 24
PHI 1520 6275 4109 1950 216 .956 0 0 0 0 13
PIT 1550 6249 4132 1903 214 .960 0 0 0 0 16
SLN 1612 6466 4190 2041 235 .944 0 0 0 0 14

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1915 World Series, Al Demaree, Braves Field, Eppa Rixey, Erskine Mayer, Fred Luderus, Gavvy Cravath, Hans Lobert, Harry Hooper, Jimmy Lavender, John McGraw, Larry Doyle, New York Giants, Pete Alexander, Philadelphia Phillies, Rube Marquard

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