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Series Wrapup

Story

Just two years removed from the National League cellar, a retooled New York Giants ball club captured their first pennant in four years in 1917, finishing the regular season with a record of 98-56, 10 games ahead of the second-place Philadelphia Phillies.  Replacing Brooklyn atop the National League standings, the Giants topped the senior circuit with 635 runs scored, while also allowing the opposition to cross the plate a league-low 457 times.  George Burns, Heinie Zimmerman, and Dave Robertson led New York on offense.  Burns finished first in the league with 103 runs scored, placed second with 180 hits, and finished fifth with a .302 batting average.  Zimmerman led the league with 102 runs batted in, while Robertson topped the circuit with 12 home runs.  

Ferdie Schupp anchored New York’s league-leading pitching staff, finishing the campaign with a record of 21-7 to lead the National League with a .750 winning percentage.  Three other Giant hurlers won more than 15 games, with three members of their staff placing among the league’s top five in ERA.  Spot-starter Fred Anderson led the league with an ERA of 1.44; Pol Perritt finished with a mark of 1.88; Schupp posted a mark of 1.95.  

New York subsequently came up short in the World Series against the Chicago White Sox, losing the Fall Classic in six games.  The Giants tied the Series at two games apiece after dropping the first two contests.  However, the White Sox took Games Five and Six, winning the final contest in somewhat suspicious fashion.  A key play in the game involved New York third baseman Heinie Zimmerman chasing Eddie Collins across an unguarded home plate.  Immediately afterward, Zimmerman, who batted just .120 during the Series, denied throwing the game or the Series.  Yet, Zimmerman and teammate Hal Chase found themselves suspended for life less than two years later due to a series of questionable actions and associations.

Although the Giants won the pennant, second-place Philadelphia had the league’s best player in Grover Cleveland Alexander.  Posting his third straight magnificent season, Alexander led all National League pitchers with 30 wins, 200 strikeouts, 387 innings pitched, 34 complete games, and eight shutouts.  He also finished second in the league with a 1.83 ERA.   

While Alexander continued to dominate National League hitters, Rogers Hornsby began to establish himself as one of the senior circuit’s most formidable batsmen.  Hornsby helped lead the St. Louis Cardinals to a third-place finish by placing among the league leaders with a .327 batting average and topping the circuit with 17 triples and a .484 slugging average.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• Cincinnati Reds outfielder Edd Roush captured his first batting title with a mark of .341.

• In one of the most outstanding pitching duels in baseball history, Cincinnati Reds pitcher Fred Toney tossed a 10-inning no-hitter in a 1–0 win over the Chicago Cubs on May 2.  Opposing pitcher Hippo Vaughn did not surrender a hit until a one-out single in the 10th inning.

• Pittsburgh Pirates centerfielder Max Carey stole 46 bases, to lead the league in thefts for the fourth time in five seasons.

Christy Mathewson, in his only full year as a manager, led the Cincinnati Reds to a fourth-place finish.

• The Pirates finished last for the first time in the 20th century.

• The Pirates moved Honus Wagner to first base, where he batted just .265; Wagner retired at the end of the year with a .327 lifetime batting average.  

• On June 17, Boston Braves catcher Hank Gowdy became the first major league player to enlist in the service for World War I.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BRO 1652 5251 511 1299 429 .207 159 78 25 130 0 1689 .289 .261 .570 0 0 162
BSN 1649 5201 536 1280 452 .204 169 75 22 155 0 1665 .341 .257 .608 0 0 182
CHN 1755 5135 552 1229 458 .192 194 67 17 127 0 1608 .307 .241 .588 0 0 202
CIN 1677 5251 601 1385 513 .196 196 100 26 153 0 1859 .298 .253 .593 0 0 131
NY1 1719 5211 635 1360 537 .192 170 71 39 162 1789 .311 .256 .613 151
PHI 1614 5084 578 1262 526 .215 225 60 38 109 1721 .291 .283 .575 186
PIT 1690 5169 464 1230 396 .194 160 61 9 150 1539 .278 .244 .535 174
SLN 1738 5083 531 1271 436 .183 159 93 26 159 0 1694 .290 .226 .568 0 0 160

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BRO 237 70 81 1421 582 405 5843 1288 32 36.180 439 566 99 7 9 26 3
BSN 238 72 81 1425 593 371 5824 1309 19 27.730 438 558 105 19 3 28 2
CHN 278 74 80 1404 654 374 5719 1303 34 41.860 408 567 79 15 9 37 2
CIN 242 78 76 1397 488 402 5868 1358 20 64.360 419 611 94 12 6 16 2
NY1 255 98 56 1427 551 327 5721 1221 29 27.480 360 457 92 17 14 24 1
PHI 219 87 65 1389 616 325 5610 1258 25 19.360 379 500 102 22 5 21 4
PIT 241 51 103 1418 509 432 5887 1318 14 27.810 474 595 84 17 6 27 6
SLN 294 82 70 1391 502 421 5669 1257 29 43.560 469 568 66 16 10 20 2

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BRO 1560 6510 4250 2015 245 .926 0 0 0 0 14
BSN 1559 6544 4250 2070 224 .933 0 0 0 0 17
CHN 1627 6472 4193 2012 267 .949 0 0 0 0 26
CIN 1572 6484 4186 2051 247 .946 0 0 0 0 24
NY1 1636 6567 4274 2085 208 .964 0 0 0 0 7
PHI 1527 6479 4161 2106 212 .961 0 0 0 0 16
PIT 1579 6460 4244 1965 251 .946 0 0 0 0 16
SLN 1631 6680 4166 2293 221 .939 0 0 0 0 15

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1917 World Series, Chicago White Sox, Christy Mathewson, Dave Robertson, Edd Roush, Eddie Collins, Ferdie Schupp, Fred Anderson, Fred Toney, George Burns, Hal Chase, Hank Gowdy, Heinie Zimmerman, Hippo Vaughn, Honus Wagner, John McGraw, Max Carey, New York Giants, Pete Alexander, Pol Perritt, Rogers Hornsby

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