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Series Wrapup

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The trend towards home runs and run production continued throughout the 1922 baseball season, particularly in the National League, where Philadelphia and St. Louis became the first two teams in the senior circuit to surpass 100 home runs in a single season.  The Phillies led the league with 116 homers, while the Cardinals finished second with 107 round-trippers.  Meanwhile, National League hitters posted a composite batting average of .292, causing the league’s overall ERA to rise to a bloated 4.10.  Only one pitcher in the senior circuit – Phil Douglas of the Giants – recorded an ERA under 3.00 (he led the league with a mark of 2.63).

No other player better symbolized the National League’s movement towards increased offensive production than Rogers Hornsby.  The St. Louis second baseman became the senior circuit’s first undisputed 20th-century Triple Crown winner (some historians suggest Heinie Zimmerman won the Triple Crown in 1912) by leading the league in virtually every major statistical category.  Posting one of the greatest seasons in National League history, Hornsby topped the circuit with 42 home runs, 152 runs batted in, a .401 batting average, 141 runs scored, 250 hits, 46 doubles, 450 total bases, a .459 on-base percentage, and a .722 slugging percentage.  He punctuated his great season by also leading all league second basemen in putouts, double plays, and fielding average.

Hornsby’s extraordinary performance enabled the Cardinals to remain in the pennant race for most of the year.  However, they ended up finishing tied for third in the National League, a full eight games behind the pennant-winning New York Giants.  The Giants repeated as league champions by finishing the year seven games ahead of second-place Cincinnati, with a record of 93-61.

Although the Giants had no one the ilk of Hornsby, they scored only 11 fewer runs than the Cardinals, placing third in the National League with 852 runs scored.  First baseman George Kelly batted .328 and finished among the league leaders with 17 home runs and 107 runs batted in.  Second baseman Frankie Frisch batted .327, scored 101 runs, and finished second in the league with 31 stolen bases.  Shortstop Dave Bancroft hit .321, collected 209 hits, and scored 117 runs.  Outfielder Ross Youngs batted .331 and scored 105 runs.  Fellow outfielder Irish Meusel also batted .331, amassed 204 hits, scored 100 runs, and placed among the league leaders with 16 home runs and 132 runs batted in.  

Meanwhile, New York featured the senior circuit’s best pitching staff – one that surrendered a league-low 658 runs to the opposition.  In addition to Phil Douglas, who captured the ERA title, New York’s starting rotation included 19-game winner Art Nehf, who compiled an impressive 3.29 ERA and led the club with 20 complete games and 268 innings pitched.

The Giants opposed the New York Yankees in the World Series for the second straight year, facing off in another “Subway Series.”  This meeting, played under a best-of-seven format, proved to be even less competitive than their earlier encounter.  The Yankees managed only a 3-3 tie in Game Two, losing to their Polo Grounds co-occupants in five games.  Giants pitchers Jesse Barnes, Art Nehf, Hugh McQuillan, and Jack Scott completely shut down the Yankees, who scored only 11 runs in the five games.  Irish Meusel knocked in seven runs for the Giants, while Babe Ruth managed just two singles and batted only .118 for the Yankees.  

Although the Giants had the National League’s best pitching staff, the second-place Reds weren’t very far behind.  Cincinnati hurlers surrendered only 19 more runs to the opposition, finishing a close second in the senior circuit in team ERA.  Eppa Rixey headed Cincinnati’s starting rotation, leading the league with 25 wins and 313 innings pitched, while also placing among the leaders with 26 complete games.  Pete Donohue won 18 games for the Reds and finished third in the league with a 3.12 ERA.     

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• Pittsburgh Pirates centerfielder Max Carey led the league with 51 stolen bases, placed second with 140 runs scored, and collected 207 hits.

• Pirates teammate Carson Bigbee batted .350, knocked in 99 runs, scored 113 others, and finished second in the league with 215 hits.
 
• Ray Grimes of the Cubs drove in at least one run in 17 straight games.   

• May 7 - Jesse Barnes of the New York Giants pitched a no-hitter in a 6–0 win over the Philadelphia Phillies.

• October 1 - Rogers Hornsby went three-for-five in the last game of the season to finish the campaign with a .401 batting average.  By doing so, he became the first National Leaguer to end the season with a .400 average since 1901.  Hornsby also established new National League records with 42 home runs, 152 runs batted in, and a .722 slugging percentage.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BRO 1729 5413 743 1569 674 .244 235 76 56 79 60 2124 .339 .328 .691 0 0 178
BSN 1725 5161 596 1355 509 .196 162 73 32 67 65 1759 .283 .245 .553 0 0 174
CHN 1749 5335 771 1564 667 .266 248 71 42 97 108 2080 .383 .378 .784 205
CIN 1651 5282 766 1561 686 .273 226 99 45 130 136 2120 .357 .389 .763 189
NY1 1756 5454 852 1661 756 .254 253 90 80 116 83 2334 .413 .327 .783 159
PHI 1677 5459 738 1537 685 .239 268 55 116 48 60 2263 .328 .353 .681 140
PIT 1648 5521 865 1698 777 .239 239 110 52 145 59 2313 .347 .315 .709 0 0 175
SLN 1895 5425 863 1634 787 .272 280 88 107 73 63 2411 .349 .389 .751 0 0 161

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BRO 270 76 78 1386 499 490 6082 1574 74 57.810 623 752 82 11 8 24 2
BSN 300 53 100 1349 360 489 5963 1565 57 88.220 655 822 63 7 6 26 4
CHN 294 80 74 1399 402 475 6097 1579 77 90.540 674 808 74 8 12 29 5
CIN 249 86 68 1386 357 326 5839 1481 49 37.250 544 677 88 8 3 12 4
NY1 291 93 61 1397 388 393 5911 1454 71 53.800 536 658 76 6 15 24 1
PHI 272 57 96 1372 394 460 6186 1692 89 67.970 707 914 73 6 5 42 5
PIT 269 85 69 1388 490 358 6006 1613 52 44.500 614 736 88 15 7 18 2
SLN 326 85 69 1363 465 447 6048 1609 61 71.100 672 826 60 8 12 26 4

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BRO 1593 6291 4150 1933 208 .943 0 0 0 0 18
BSN 1592 6154 4038 1901 215 .953 0 0 0 0 8
CHN 1637 6394 4183 2007 204 .955 0 0 0 0 6
CIN 1535 6441 4152 2084 205 .918 0 0 0 0 6
NY1 1630 6458 4181 2083 194 .937 0 0 0 0 16
PHI 1561 6504 4132 2147 225 .912 0 0 0 0 10
PIT 1554 6166 4159 1820 187 .943 0 0 0 0 13
SLN 1715 6200 4088 1873 239 .908 0 0 0 0 9

West

Central

East

Awards

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Tagged:
1922 World Series, Art Nehf, Babe Ruth, Carson Bigbee, Dave Bancroft, Eppa Rixey, Frankie Frisch, George Kelly, Heinie Zimmerman, Hugh McQuillan, Irish Meusel, Jack Scott, Jesse Barnes, Max Carey, New York Giants, Pete Donohue, Phil Douglas, Ray Grimes, Rogers Hornsby, Ross Youngs

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