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Series Wrapup

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The National League opened the 1933 campaign without John McGraw in uniform for the first time in three decades.  After the longtime Giants’ manager resigned 40 games into the previous season, Bill Terry replaced him at the helm for the remainder of the year.  Baseball bid McGraw a classy adieu by naming him manager of the National League entry in the first All-Star Game, held in Chicago’s Comiskey Park on July 6.  Connie Mack's American League squad won the contest 4-2 on a Babe Ruth home run.

Terry ended up doing an outstanding job as McGraw’s replacement, leading the Giants to the National League pennant in his first full year as manager.  New York finished the 1933 season with a record of 91-61, five games ahead of the second-place Pittsburgh Pirates.  Chicago finished third, six games back.  Boston came in fourth, nine games off the pace, just one-half game ahead of the fifth-place St. Louis Cardinals.

The Giants had neither the best hitting nor the best fielding team in the senior circuit in 1933.  They finished just fourth in the league with 636 runs scored.  Terry and Mel Ott paced New York on offense.  Terry placed among the league leaders with a .322 batting average, while Ott batted .283 and finished third in the league with 23 home runs and 103 runs batted in.
 
The fact that those numbers seem relatively low really should come as no surprise.  After experimenting with a livelier ball in 1930, the National League reverted back to a more conventional sphere the following year.  The result was a marked decrease in the total number of runs scored throughout the league – 7,025 in 1930, and 5,537 in 1931.  By 1933, the run total dropped to just 4,908 – the lowest figure since 1920.  For the first time in years, National League pitchers thrived, with the league ERA gradually dropping from a 20th century high 4.97 in 1930, to just 3.34 in 1933.  

Led by the trio of Carl Hubbell, Hal Schumacher, and Freddie Fitzsimmons, New York had the best pitching staff in the senior circuit, surrendering a league-low 515 runs to the opposition and leading the league with a 2.71 team ERA.  Schumacher finished among the league leaders with 19 victories, 21 complete games, seven shutouts, and a 2.16 ERA.  Fitzsimmons posted 16 wins and a 2.90 ERA.  Hubbell anchored the staff, leading the league with 23 victories, a 1.66 ERA, 308 innings pitched, and 10 shutouts, en route to earning N.L. MVP honors.  His 1.66 ERA was the lowest mark compiled in the senior circuit since Grover Cleveland Alexander finished the 1916 campaign with a mark of 1.55.   

Hubbell continued his dominance against the Washington Senators in the World Series, leading his team to victory by throwing 20 scoreless innings over the course of two complete-game wins.  The Giants defeated the Senators in five games, with their pitching staff posting a team ERA of 1.53 over the course of the five contests.  New York outscored Washington by a combined margin of 16-11.

While New York’s superior pitching proved to be the difference in the National League pennant race, the St. Louis Cardinals and Pittsburgh Pirates featured the top two offenses in the senior circuit.  Paul Waner had a fine season for second-place Pittsburgh, batting over .300 for the eighth straight year and placing among the league leaders with 101 runs scored, 191 hits, 38 doubles, and 16 triples.  Meanwhile, the Branch Rickey-inspired farm system began to pay huge dividends in St. Louis.  Although the Cardinals finished fifth in the league, they featured two of the senior circuit’s best young players in Joe Medwick and Pepper Martin.  Medwick finished near the top of the league rankings in home runs, runs batted in, runs scored, doubles, and total bases.  Martin led the league with 122 runs scored and 26 stolen bases, and he also finished among the leaders in batting average, hits, triples, and on-base percentage.  Boston Braves outfielder Wally Berger also had a big year, batting .313 and finishing second in the league with 27 home runs, 106 runs batted in, 299 total bases, and a .566 slugging percentage.

Philadelphia’s Chuck Klein was the league’s top offensive performer for the third consecutive year.  Klein won the N.L. Triple Crown by topping the circuit with 28 home runs, 120 runs batted in, and a .368 batting average.  He also led the league with 223 hits, 44 doubles, 365 total bases, a .422 on-base percentage, and a .602 slugging percentage.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• November 21 – Despite winning the National League Triple Crown, Chuck Klein was sold to the Chicago Cubs for $125,000 and three players.  Klein remains the only player in baseball history to be traded after winning the Triple Crown the previous year.

• Cincinnati's Red Lucas paced the major leagues in fewest walks per game - an incredible .74.

Lloyd Waner's eight strikeouts remain the fewest ever by a major league regular outfielder.

• Philadelphia’s Mickey Finn died of an ulcer.

• Pittsburgh’s Arky Vaughan led the majors with 19 triples.

Dizzy Dean of St. Louis led the major leagues with 199 strikeouts.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BRO 1813 5367 617 1413 566 .209 224 51 62 82 0 1925 .292 .274 .584 139 0 90
BSN 1671 5243 552 1320 511 .239 217 56 54 25 1811 .312 .300 .623 142 134
CHN 1654 5255 646 1422 608 .228 256 51 72 52 0 1996 .314 .309 .647 161 0 108
CIN 1709 5156 496 1267 455 .207 208 37 34 30 1651 .286 .262 .559 161 115
NY1 1730 5352 630 1417 586 .211 202 40 81 31 1942 .298 .273 .581 135 81
PHI 1772 5261 607 1439 570 .202 240 41 60 55 0 1941 .277 .260 .554 128 0 125
PIT 1708 5429 667 1548 618 .210 249 84 39 34 0 2082 .287 .271 .592 106 0 147
SLN 1753 5387 687 1486 629 .220 256 61 57 99 0 2035 .302 .299 .622 131 0 101

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BRO 290 65 88 1386 415 374 6000 1502 51 50.960 574 692 71 9 10 34 2
BSN 258 83 71 1405 383 355 5828 1391 54 35.080 462 531 85 15 16 13 3
CHN 251 86 68 1362 488 413 5737 1316 51 37.330 443 536 95 16 9 32 1
CIN 266 58 94 1352 310 257 5666 1470 47 34.340 514 643 74 13 8 24 2
NY1 237 68 49 1100 399 353 4605 1024 55 43.850 367 445 53 12 10 27 2
PHI 322 60 92 1337 341 410 5899 1563 87 67.660 645 759 52 10 13 30 4
PIT 298 87 67 1373 401 313 5800 1417 54 173.350 499 619 70 16 12 17 2
SLN 282 82 71 1382 635 452 5899 1391 55 41.410 518 609 73 11 16 26 1

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BRO 1659 6112 4159 1776 177 .960 0 0 0 0 4
BSN 1566 6226 4195 1893 138 .962 0 0 0 0 7
CHN 1538 6126 4089 1869 168 .961 0 0 0 0 5
CIN 1600 6089 4050 1862 177 .955 0 0 0 0 13
NY1 1592 6370 4201 1993 176 .962 0 0 0 0 12
PHI 1590 6038 4010 1845 183 .958 0 0 0 0 11
PIT 1569 6005 4118 1721 166 .972 0 0 0 0 7
SLN 1587 5977 4148 1667 162 .934 0 0 0 0 11

West

Central

East

Awards

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Tagged:
1933 World Series, Arky Vaughan, Bill Terry, Carl Hubbell, Chuck Klein, Connie Mack, Dizzy Dean, Freddie Fitzsimmons, Hal Schumacher, Joe Medwick, John McGraw, Lloyd Waner, Mel Ott, New York Giants, Paul Waner, Pepper Martin, Red Lucas, Wally Berger, Washington Senators

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