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Series Wrapup

Story

The defending world champion New York Giants appeared to be headed towards their second consecutive World Series for much of the 1934 campaign.  The Giants spent 127 straight days in the top spot in the National League, before the St. Louis Cardinals finally tied them for first place on September 28 when Cardinals’ ace Dizzy Dean shut out the Reds 4-0.  Dean’s younger brother Paul (also known as “Daffy”) defeated Cincinnati the very next day, to give St. Louis a lead it never relinquished.  The Cardinals claimed the National League pennant by finishing the regular season with a record of 95-58, two games ahead of the second-place Giants.    

New York had the National League’s best pitching staff for the second straight year, surrendering a league-low 583 runs to the opposition.  Carl Hubbell had another outstanding year, winning 21 games and leading all N.L. hurlers with a 2.30 ERA.  Hal Schumacher also pitched extremely well for the Giants, finishing second in the league with 23 victories and placing fourth with 297 innings pitched.

But the St. Louis starting rotation featured the senior circuit’s best pitcher in 1934.  Dizzy Dean led the league with a record of 30-7, 195 strikeouts, and seven shutouts, en route to earning N.L. MVP honors.  He also placed among the leaders with a 2.66 earned run average, 24 complete games, and 311 innings pitched.  Dean initially drew criticism for predicting during the preseason that he and his brother would combine to win a total of 45 games for the Cardinals.  However, by season’s end, the Dean brothers posted a total of 49 victories between them.

Still, Dizzy and Daffy had a considerable amount of help from their St. Louis teammates.  In fact, the Cardinals finished first in the National League in both team batting average (.288) and runs scored (799).  Joe Medwick hit 18 home runs, drove in 106 runs, scored 110 others, batted .319, and led the league with 18 triples.  Ripper Collins topped the circuit with 35 homers, 369 total bases, and a .615 slugging percentage.  He also placed near the top of the league rankings with 128 runs batted in, 116 runs scored, a .333 batting average, 200 hits, and 40 doubles.  

Perhaps the player who best-exemplified the Cardinals’ aggressive style of play, though, was Pepper Martin, the former hobo, who led the league with 23 stolen bases.  Martin’s daring outfield play and mad dashes on the base paths very much epitomized the aggressive brand of baseball the Cardinals played - one that prompted New York sportswriter Frank Graham to nickname them the “Gashouse Gang.”  

The Cardinals subsequently faced the hard-hitting Detroit Tigers in the World Series.  With the Dean brothers leading the way (they each won two games), St. Louis won a hard-fought seven-game Series.  The Fall Classic ended on a bizarre note when Detroit fans pelted Joe Medwick with garbage after the St. Louis outfielder slid aggressively into Tiger third baseman Marv Owen during the Cardinals’ 11-0 Game Seven route.  Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis subsequently ordered Medwick to leave the game for his own safety.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• April 17 - Casey Stengel made his Major League managerial debut, as his Brooklyn Dodgers lost to the Boston Braves, 8-7, at Ebbets Field on Opening Day.

• July 10 - At the All-Star Game held at the Polo Grounds in New York City, New York Giants pitcher Carl Hubbell struck out five consecutive American League batters: Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons, and Joe Cronin, all future Hall-of-Famers.  Nevertheless, the American League ended up defeating the National league by a score of 9–7.

Paul Waner captured the second of his three batting titles with a mark of .362.

• Dizzy Dean became the last National League hurler to win 30 games, posting exactly 30 victories for the pennant-winning Cardinals.

Paul Dean no-hit the Dodgers on Sept. 21.

• Paul Waner topped the National League with 122 runs scored and 217 hits.  

• New York's Mel Ott tied Ripper Collins for the N.L. lead with 35 home runs.  Ott also topped the circuit with 135 runs batted in, and he finished among the leaders with 119 runs scored and a .326 batting average.

• Giants player-manager Bill Terry finished second in the league with a batting average of .354.

John McGraw died.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
BRO 1839 5427 748 1526 699 .223 284 52 79 55 2151 .337 .295 .661 112 77
BSN 1697 5370 683 1460 649 .228 233 44 83 30 2030 .307 .283 .612 128 81
CHN 1691 5347 705 1494 664 .223 263 44 101 59 0 2148 .298 .314 .636 112 0 93
CIN 1752 5361 590 1428 560 .198 227 65 55 34 0 1950 .299 .295 .658 136 0 78
NY1 1728 5279 751 1462 707 .241 239 41 126 19 2161 .335 .350 .699 102 105
PHI 1733 5218 675 1480 634 .234 286 35 56 52 2004 .322 .293 .633 131 79
PIT 1711 5361 735 1541 679 .269 281 77 52 44 0 2132 .360 .379 .740 130 0 59
SLN 1761 5502 799 1582 748 .204 294 75 104 69 0 2338 .375 .289 .711 117 0 76

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
BRO 319 71 81 1353 520 475 5981 1540 81 76.250 674 791 66 6 12 37 1
BSN 290 78 73 1359 462 405 5924 1512 78 55.800 621 714 62 11 20 13 2
CHN 281 86 65 1360 633 417 5838 1432 80 82.430 568 639 73 11 9 32 3
CIN 334 52 99 1348 438 389 6014 1645 61 83.920 654 801 51 3 19 20 2
NY1 233 72 48 1057 381 314 4499 1098 58 40.740 406 483 43 7 22 32 1
PHI 324 56 93 1297 416 437 5759 1501 126 85.520 686 792 52 8 15 17 4
PIT 310 74 76 1330 487 354 5827 1523 78 74.410 620 712 63 8 8 18 2
SLN 300 95 58 1388 689 411 5964 1463 77 61.730 568 656 78 15 16 23 2

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
BRO 1700 6100 4060 1860 180 .938 0 0 0 0 16
BSN 1573 6067 4074 1824 169 .953 0 0 0 0 6
CHN 1575 6016 4085 1794 137 .975 0 0 0 0 13
CIN 1603 6039 4042 1816 181 .975 0 0 0 0 15
NY1 1572 6216 4090 1949 177 .966 0 0 0 0 12
PHI 1581 5789 3899 1693 197 .931 0 0 0 0 11
PIT 1567 5712 3983 1584 145 .976 0 0 0 0 4
SLN 1620 5998 4158 1674 166 .964 0 0 0 0 8

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

Gold Glove

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Tagged:
1934 World Series, Bill Terry, Carl Hubbell, Casey Stengel, Chuck Klein, Dizzy Dean, Hal Schumacher, Joe Medwick, John McGraw, Kenesaw Landis, Mel Ott, Paul Dean, Paul Waner, Pepper Martin, Ripper Collins, St. Louis Cardinals

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