TheBaseballPage.com

Series Wrapup

Story

With the American League expanding to 10 teams in 1961, offensive production increased dramatically in the junior circuit due to a watering down of pitching staffs.  Although the National League was still a year away from increasing its number of teams from eight to ten, the senior circuit featured a number of exceptional offensive performances as well.  Roberto Clemente had his finest season to-date for the sixth-place Pittsburgh Pirates, hitting 23 home runs, driving in 89 runs, scoring 100 others, and leading the league with a .351 batting average.  Ken Boyer hit 24 homers, knocked in 95 runs, scored 109 others, and batted .329 for the fifth-place Cardinals.  Hank Aaron, whose Braves finished fourth, hit 34 homers, drove in 120 runs, scored 115 others, batted .327, and led the league with 39 doubles.  Orlando Cepeda and Willie Mays both had big years for the Giants, who topped the circuit with 773 runs scored en route to finishing third in the league, eight games out of first.  Cepeda earned a second-place finish in the MVP voting by leading the league with 46 home runs and 142 runs batted in, scoring 105 runs, and batting .311.  Mays hit 40 homers, knocked in 123 runs, batted .308, and topped the circuit with 129 runs scored.

In the end, though, pitching and defense proved to be the determining factors in the National League pennant race.  Although the Cincinnati Reds finished just fourth in the league in runs scored (710), they allowed their opposition to cross the plate fewer times than any other team in the circuit (653).  As a result, the Reds captured their first N.L. flag in 21 years, finishing the regular season with a record of 93-61, four games ahead of the second-place Los Angeles Dodgers.

Joey Jay had a career-year on the mound for Cincinnati, tying for the league lead with 21 victories and four shutouts, en route to earning a fifth-place finish in the N.L. MVP balloting.  Jim O’Toole finished third in the league with 19 wins and placed second in the circuit with a 3.10 ERA.  Bob Purkey gave the Reds another reliable starter, finishing third on the staff with 16 victories.  

Meanwhile, Gordy Coleman, Gene Freese, Vada Pinson, and Frank Robinson paced Cincinnati on offense.  Coleman and Freese each hit 26 homers and drove in 87 runs.  The speedy Pinson hit 16 home runs, knocked in 87 runs, scored 101 others, finished second in the league with a .343 batting average, 34 doubles, and 23 stolen bases, and topped the circuit with 208 hits.  Pinson’s outstanding performance enabled him to finish third in the MVP voting.  Winning the award was Frank Robinson, who led the league with a .611 slugging percentage and placed among the leaders with 37 home runs, 124 runs batted in, 117 runs scored, a .323 batting average, 22 stolen bases, and a .411 on-base percentage.  

The Reds subsequently faced the New York Yankees in the World Series, where their strong pitching staff met its ultimate challenge.  After holding up rather well through the first three contests, Cincinnati pitchers allowed the Yankees seven runs on 11 hits in a 7-0 Game Four defeat, during which New York starter Whitey Ford broke Babe Ruth’s World Series record of 29 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings pitched.  The Yankee ace ran his streak to 32 innings before leaving the game in the
sixth inning with an ankle injury.  Yankee bats then exploded for 15 hits during a 13-5 trouncing of the Reds in Game Five, which clinched New York’s 19th world championship.
 
Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• Chicago Cubs outfielder Billy Williams (25 home runs, 86 RBIs, .278 average) earned N.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Willie Mays hit four home runs against the Braves on April 30.

• The Phillies lost a major league record 23 straight games at one point during the season.

• Warren Spahn tied Joey Jay for the league lead with 21 victories.  Spahn led the league in wins a major-league record eight times.

• Spahn also led all N.L. hurlers with 21 complete games and a 3.01 ERA.

• Spahn no-hit the Giants on April 28.

• Spahn won his 300th game, becoming the first National League southpaw to reach the magical 300-mark.

• The National League won the first All-Star Game of the year, 5-4, in 10 innings at San Francisco.  At one point during the contest, Candlestick Park’s infamous wind blew pitcher Stu Miller off the mound.

• The second All-Star Game ended in a 1-1 tie at Boston, with rain halting play after nine innings.

• Milwaukee's Eddie Mathews surpassed 30 home runs for a National League record ninth consecutive year.

• Roberto Clemente won his first Gold Glove as a National League outfielder.

• Bill Dewitt became the new owner of the Cincinnati Reds.

• Milwaukee’s Lew Burdette led all N.L. hurlers with 272 innings pitched.

• Sandy Koufax of the Dodgers led the National League in strikeouts for the first time, fanning a total of 269 batters.

• Dodger outfielder Wally Moon batted .328 and led the National League with a .438 on-base percentage.

• Dodger shortstop Maury Wills led the league with 35 stolen bases.

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
CHN 2009 5344 689 1364 650 .194 238 51 176 35 25 2232 .309 .295 .631 115 33 52
CIN 1952 5243 710 1414 675 .205 247 35 158 70 33 2205 .317 .305 .650 109 51 50
LAN 2077 5189 735 1358 673 .206 193 40 157 86 45 2102 .343 .322 .698 117 36 96
ML1 1847 5288 712 1365 662 .177 199 34 188 70 43 2196 .302 .254 .597 133 40 62
PHI 2091 5213 584 1265 549 .209 185 50 103 56 30 1859 .316 .275 .607 130 28 108
PIT 1905 5311 694 1448 646 .236 232 57 128 26 30 2178 .337 .324 .692 140 37 64
SFN 1967 5233 773 1379 709 .209 219 32 183 79 54 2211 .355 .315 .671 124 48 70
SLN 2063 5307 703 1436 657 .255 236 51 103 46 28 2083 .326 .341 .668 108 40 70

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
CHN 404 64 90 1385 755 465 6021 1492 165 65.470 690 800 34 6 25 50 3
CIN 364 93 61 1370 829 500 5833 1300 147 50.770 576 653 46 9 40 40 5
LAN 393 89 65 1380 1105 544 5950 1346 167 55.170 619 697 40 8 35 66 7
ML1 349 83 71 1390 652 493 5895 1357 153 85.670 602 656 57 8 16 30 6
PHI 412 47 107 1383 775 521 5985 1452 155 69.510 708 796 29 7 13 54 0
PIT 390 75 79 1362 759 400 5790 1442 121 65.740 593 675 34 9 29 39 1
SFN 390 85 69 1388 924 502 5891 1306 152 46.570 582 655 39 8 30 33 8
SLN 339 80 74 1368 823 570 5901 1334 136 48.680 569 668 49 9 24 44 3

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
CHN 2348 7162 5068 1883 211 .964 16616 61 35 1.00 35
CIN 2303 6887 5093 1636 158 .936 16441 68 33 1.00 23
LAN 2579 6784 5010 1605 169 .946 16538 53 33 0 14
ML1 2200 7165 5152 1879 134 .985 16694 43 36 0 11
PHI 2386 7141 5123 1849 169 .968 16597 73 60 2.00 26
PIT 2192 7057 5045 1838 174 .973 16343 41 24 1.00 19
SFN 2324 6816 5123 1543 150 .975 16656 63 29 1.00 10
SLN 2464 7037 5055 1793 189 .942 16426 67 40 1.00 17

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

More From Around the Web

This day in baseball history

July 29

  • 1996

    On July 29, 1996, future Hall of Famer Tommy Lasorda announc ...

  • 1983

    On July 29, 1983, Steve Garvey’s National League record pl ...

  • 1973

    On July 29, 1973, Wilbur Wood earns his 20th victory, as the ...

More Baseball History
Tagged:
1961 World Series, Bill DeWitt, Billy Williams, Bob Purkey, Cincinnati Reds, Eddie Mathews, Frank Robinson, Gene Freese, Gordy Coleman, Hank Aaron, Joey Jay, Ken Boyer, Lew Burdette, Maury Wills, New York Yankees, Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente, Sandy Koufax, Stu Miller, Vada Pinson, Wally Moon, Warren Spahn, Whitey Ford, Willie Mays

Comments

    Be respectful, keep it clean.
Login or register to post comments

Share US

Share |