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Series Wrapup

NL Detailed Standings

Rk Team W L W-L% GB pythWL Home Road ExInn
1 St. Louis 101 60 .627 --- 97-64 49-32 52-28 12-6
2 San Francisco 91 71 .562 10.5 93-69 51-31 40-40 9-9
3 Chicago 87 74 .540 14.0 89-72 49-34 38-40 7-9
4 Cincinnati 87 75 .537 14.5 86-76 49-32 38-43 8-10
5 Philadelphia 82 80 .506 19.5 85-77 45-35 37-45 12-5
6 Pittsburgh 81 81 .500 20.5 79-83 49-32 32-49 11-5
7 Atlanta 77 85 .475 24.5 80-82 48-33 29-52 6-11
8 Los Angeles 73 89 .451 28.5 71-91 42-39 31-50 10-17
9 Houston 69 93 .426 32.5 69-93 46-35 23-58 8-11
10 New York 61 101 .377 40.5 59-103 36-42 25-59 9-9

 

Story

With Sandy Koufax having announced his retirement shortly after the conclusion of the previous campaign, the defending N.L. champion Los Angeles Dodgers slipped to eighth-place in the senior circuit in 1967, 28 ½ games out of first.  In Koufax’s absence, the St. Louis Cardinals established themselves as the National League’s dominant team, finishing the regular season with a record of 101-60, 10 ½ games in front of the second-place San Francisco Giants.  The Chicago Cubs finished third in the loop, 14 games in back of the Cardinals.

The Cardinals ran away with the National League flag even though a broken leg sidelined ace right-hander Bob Gibson for most of the season’s second half.  A line drive off the bat of Roberto Clemente put Gibson out of commission for two months, although he nevertheless managed to compile a record of 13-7 and an outstanding 2.98 ERA.  Dick Hughes, Nelson Briles, and 22-year-old left-hander Steve Carlton stepped to the forefront in Gibson’s absence.  Hughes led the team with 16 victories, 12 complete games, and a 2.67 ERA.  Working as a starter and as a reliever, Briles won 14 games and saved six others.  Carlton finished 14-9, with a 2.98 ERA and a team-leading 168 strikeouts.  

Tim McCarver, Curt Flood, Lou Brock, and Orlando Cepeda paced the Cardinals on offense.  McCarver batted .295 and knocked in 69 runs.  Flood finished fourth in the league with a .335 batting average.  Brock ignited the St. Louis offense by hitting 21 home runs, driving in 76 runs, batting .299, collecting 206 hits, and leading the league with 113 runs scored and 52 stolen bases.  After coming over to the Cardinals from the Giants via a trade during the off-season, Cepeda earned N.L. MVP honors by hitting 25 home runs, leading the league with 111 runs batted in, and placing among the leaders with a .325 batting average, 91 runs scored, and 183 hits.    

The Cardinals subsequently entered the World Series as heavy favorites to defeat the Boston Red Sox.  Although the Red Sox put up a good fight, they eventually fell to the National League champions in seven games.  Bob Gibson proved to be the difference in the Series, winning his three starts by scores of 2-1, 6-0, and 7-2, throwing three complete games, striking out 26 batters in his 27 innings of work, and compiling an ERA of 1.00.  Gibson got the better of Boston ace Jim Lonborg in the decisive seventh contest.  Lou Brock and Roger Maris also excelled for St. Louis.  Brock batted .414, scored eight runs, and stole seven bases.  Maris batted .385 and drove in seven runs.

Featuring the National League’s best pitching staff and one of the circuit’s top offenses, the runner-up Giants provided the stiffest competition to the Cardinals over the course of the regular season.  Cy Young Award winner Mike McCormick anchored San Francisco’s starting rotation.  He finished the year with a record of 22-10, a 2.85 ERA, and 262 innings pitched.  Meanwhile, with an aging Willie Mays hitting only 22 homers, driving in just 70 runs, and batting only .263, Willie McCovey and Jim Ray Hart led the Giants on offense.  McCovey hit 31 home runs and knocked in 91 runs.  Hart batted .289, hit 29 homers, and led the club with 99 runs batted in and 98 runs scored.  

Both Ron Santo and Ferguson Jenkins had outstanding years for the third-place Cubs.  Santo hit 31 homers, drove in 98 runs, scored 107 others, and batted .300.  Jenkins finished 20-13, with an ERA of 2.80, 236 strikeouts, 289 innings pitched, and a league-leading 20 complete games.

Oddly enough, the two best players in the league played for non-contending teams.  Roberto Clemente followed up his MVP performance of one year earlier by hitting 23 home runs, driving in 110 runs, scoring 103 others, and topping the circuit with a .357 batting average and 209 hits.  His Pittsburgh Pirates placed sixth in the final standings, 20 ½ games behind the pennant-winning Cardinals.  Meanwhile, Hank Aaron had an exceptional year for the Atlanta Braves, who finished seventh in the league, 24 ½ games in back of St. Louis.  Aaron drove in 109 runs, batted .307, and topped the circuit with 39 homers, 113 runs scored, 344 total bases, and a .573 slugging percentage.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• January 23 – The St. Louis Cardinals named Stan Musial their new General Manager.

• April 20 – New York’s Tom Seaver earned his first major league victory, defeating the Chicago Cubs by a score of 6-1.

• July 14 – Playing for the Houston Astros, Eddie Mathews became the seventh member of the 500-home run club when he homered against Juan Marichal of the San Francisco Giants.

• Tom Seaver (16-13, 2.76 ERA) earned N.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Houston’s Don Wilson threw a no-hitter against Atlanta on June 18.

• Cardinal Curt Flood's record streak of 568 consecutive errorless chances in the outfield ended.

• Jim Wynn established a long-standing Houston Astros record by hitting 37 home runs (since broken).

• Philadelphia’s Jim Bunning led the league with 302 innings pitched and 253 strikeouts.  He also tied for the lead with six shutouts.

• Atlanta's Phil Niekro led all N.L. hurlers with a 1.87

Seasons of the National League

1876 · 1877 · 1878 · 1879 · 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 · 1884 · 1885 · 1886 · 1887 · 1888 · 1889 · 1890 · 1891 · 1892 · 1893 · 1894 · 1895 · 1896 · 1897 · 1898 · 1899 · 1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904 · 1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 · 1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929 · 1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939 · 1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944 · 1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010  

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ATL 2059 5450 631 1307 596 .158 191 29 158 55 45 2030 .294 .218 .568 128 36 57
CHN 1931 5463 702 1373 642 .185 211 49 128 63 50 2066 .287 .253 .577 112 49 93
CIN 1994 5519 604 1366 560 .171 251 54 109 92 63 2052 .264 .241 .542 111 34 56
HOU 2050 5506 626 1372 581 .185 259 46 93 88 38 2002 .292 .252 .578 123 43 65
LAN 2111 5456 519 1285 465 .174 203 38 82 56 47 1810 .267 .233 .526 133 35 91
NYN 2166 5417 498 1288 461 .141 178 23 83 58 44 1761 .262 .197 .508 113 44 68
PHI 2077 5401 612 1306 553 .202 221 47 103 79 62 1930 .311 .304 .635 108 33 90
PIT 2078 5724 679 1585 615 .203 193 62 91 79 37 2175 .296 .273 .587 131 45 63
SFN 2111 5524 652 1354 604 .178 201 39 140 22 30 2053 .303 .249 .596 121 27 92
SLN 2032 5566 695 1462 656 .189 225 40 115 102 54 2112 .288 .250 .566 105 44 54

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ATL 438 77 85 1452 862 449 6090 1377 118 67.330 561 640 35 5 32 59 5
CHN 406 87 74 1457 888 463 6089 1352 142 131.500 564 624 47 7 28 35 2
CIN 397 87 75 1468 1065 498 6156 1328 101 47.960 497 563 34 15 39 59 4
HOU 456 69 93 1446 1060 485 6208 1444 120 113.280 647 742 35 7 21 69 8
LAN 391 73 89 1474 967 393 6135 1421 93 75.330 526 595 41 14 24 39 8
NYN 439 61 101 1432 893 536 6100 1369 124 108.690 594 672 36 8 19 54 6
PHI 376 82 80 1452 967 403 6041 1372 86 85.790 501 581 46 16 23 37 4
PIT 446 81 81 1458 820 561 6230 1439 108 62.050 606 693 35 5 35 40 5
SFN 377 91 71 1475 990 453 6072 1283 113 38.340 478 551 64 14 25 48 5
SLN 433 101 60 1464 956 431 6059 1313 97 41.160 496 557 44 13 45 38 7

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ATL 2385 7324 5320 1839 165 .964 17439 81 52 0 42
CHN 2345 7335 5322 1873 140 .973 17487 57 38 0 4
CIN 2398 7155 5396 1623 136 .959 17617 81 44 1.00 12
HOU 2375 7154 5274 1688 192 .968 17347 71 48 1.00 23
LAN 2495 7479 5362 1933 184 .927 17673 58 48 1.00 13
NYN 2597 7272 5233 1855 184 .963 17203 87 60 1.00 22
PHI 2454 7309 5328 1826 155 .959 17438 63 42 1.00 16
PIT 2431 7497 5294 2035 168 .979 17498 60 39 1.00 15
SFN 2489 7405 5321 1922 162 .969 17696 75 45 1.00 18
SLN 2425 7348 5433 1752 163 .978 17577 45 48 2.00 10

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

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Tagged:
1967 World Series, Bob Gibson, Curt Flood, Dick Hughes, Don Wilson, Eddie Mathews, Fergie Jenkins, Hank Aaron, Jim Bunning, Jim Lonborg, Jim Ray Hart, Jim Wynn, Lou Brock, Mike McCormick, Nelson Briles, Orlando Cepeda, Phil Niekro, Roberto Clemente, Roger Maris, Ron Santo, St. Louis Cardinals, Stan Musial, Steve Carlton, Tim McCarver, Tom Seaver, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey

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