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Series Wrapup

NL Detailed Standings

Rk Team W L W-L% GB pythWL Home Road ExInn
1 St. Louis 97 65 .599 --- 96-66 47-34 50-31 15-8
2 San Francisco 88 74 .543 9.0 90-72 42-39 46-35 5-8
3 Chicago 84 78 .519 13.0 81-81 47-34 37-44 7-4
4 Cincinnati 83 79 .512 14.0 83-79 40-41 43-38 12-10
5 Atlanta 81 81 .500 16.0 76-86 41-40 40-41 7-13
6 Pittsburgh 80 82 .494 17.0 88-74 40-41 40-41 9-12
7 Los Angeles 76 86 .469 21.0 75-87 41-40 35-46 9-4
8 Philadelphia 76 86 .469 21.0 72-90 38-43 38-43 9-2
9 New York 73 89 .451 24.0 77-85 32-49 41-40 2-13
10 Houston 72 90 .444 25.0 71-91 42-39 30-51 6-7

 

Story

While pitching dominated both major leagues in 1968, National League hitters fared somewhat better than their American League counterparts.  Cincinnati's Pete Rose finished second in the league with 94 runs scored, and he also topped the senior circuit with a .335 batting average, 210 hits, and a .394 on-base percentage.  San Francisco's Willie McCovey led the league with 36 home runs and 105 runs batted in.  Lou Brock scored 92 runs and led the N.L. with 14 triples, 46 doubles, and 62 stolen bases.  In so doing, he became the first National League player since Honus Wagner in 1908 to lead the league in all three categories in the same year.

Nevertheless, pitchers reigned supreme in the senior circuit as well, with N.L. hurlers establishing numerous records over the course of the season.  Dodger right-hander Don Drysdale set a new major league record by throwing 58 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings.  Cardinal ace Bob Gibson posted an ERA of 1.12 – the lowest mark compiled in the major leagues since 1914.  San Francisco’s Gaylord Perry and St. Louis’ Ray Washburn tossed no-hitters on successive days at Candlestick Park.

The pennant-winning St. Louis Cardinals, who repeated as N.L. champions by finishing the year with a record of 97-65, nine games ahead of the second-place Giants, epitomized the lack of offensive firepower that prevailed in the senior circuit throughout the campaign.  The Cardinals scored only 583 runs and hit just 73 home runs as a team.  Orlando Cepeda (16) and Mike Shannon (15) were the only members of the club who finished in double-digits in homers.  Aside from Lou Brock, whose outstanding performance included a .279 batting average, Curt Flood (.301) was the only Cardinals player who posted a mark in excess of .266.  Mike Shannon led the team with 79 runs batted in, and, with the exception of Brock, no one on the club scored more than 71 times.

However, the Cardinals’ exceptional pitching allowed them to run away with their second consecutive league championship.  St. Louis led the league with a 2.49 team ERA, surrendering in the process a league-low 472 runs to the opposition.  In addition to posting an ERA of 1.12, Bob Gibson won 22 games, threw 28 complete games and 304 innings, and led all N.L. hurlers with 268 strikeouts and 13 shutouts.  Gibson’s magnificent performance earned him N.L. Cy Young and MVP honors.     

Gibson continued to pitch brilliantly against the Detroit Tigers in the World Series, helping the Cardinals build a 3-1 Series lead by earning complete-game victories in Games One and Four.  He was particularly dominant in the opening contest, setting a new World Series record by striking out 17 Tiger batters.  Detroit rallied to tie the Fall Classic at three games apiece, though, setting the stage for a decisive Game Seven.  Gibson faced Tiger left-hander Mickey Lolich in the finale, with both men shutting out the opposing team’s lineup for the first six innings.  However, the Tigers finally broke through against Gibson in the seventh frame, scoring three times, en route to posting a Series-clinching 4-1 victory.  Lolich earned Series MVP honors for posting three of his team’s four wins.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• June 8 – Against the Philadelphia Phillies at Dodger Stadium, Don Drysdale broke Walter Johnson's 1913 streak of 56 consecutive scoreless innings.  A fifth-inning sacrifice fly by Howie Bedell scored Tony Taylor for the run that ended the streak at 58 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings.  Drysdale’s mark stood until Orel Hershiser broke it in 1988 by tossing 59 consecutive scoreless frames.

• July 1 – Bob Gibson's streak of 47 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings came to an end.

• July 14 - Hank Aaron became the eighth player in major league history to reach 500 career homers.

• July 14 - Don Wilson of the Houston Astros struck out 18 batters, including eight in a row at one point.

• Lou Brock led all World Series batters with a .464 batting average and seven stolen bases.

• Bob Gibson’s 13 shutouts represented the highest total compiled in the major leagues since 1916 (Grover Cleveland Alexander).

• The National League won the first indoor All-Star Game 1-0 at Houston, scoring the winning run on a double-play grounder.  Willie Mays earned Game MVP honors, making him the first player to win the award twice.

• Cincinnati’s Johnny Bench (15 home runs, 82 RBIs, .275 batting average) earned N.L. Rookie of the Year honors.  He also won the first of his 10 consecutive Gold Gloves.

• George Culver of Cincinnati tossed a no-hitter against the Phillies on July 29.

• Gaylord Perry of the Giants no-hit the Cardinals on September 17.

• On September 18, Ray Washburn of Cardinals no-hit the Giants.

• Juan Marichal compiled a 2.43 ERA and led all N.L. hurlers with 26 wins, 326 innings pitched, and 30 complete games.

• Chicago’s Glenn Beckert led the league with 98 runs scored.

• Atlanta's Felipe Alou tied Pete Rose for the league lead with 210 hits.

• Chicago’s Phil Regan led the league with 25 saves.

Seasons of the National League

1876 · 1877 · 1878 · 1879 · 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 · 1884 · 1885 · 1886 · 1887 · 1888 · 1889 · 1890 · 1891 · 1892 · 1893 · 1894 · 1895 · 1896 · 1897 · 1898 · 1899 · 1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904 · 1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 · 1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929 · 1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939 · 1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944 · 1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010  

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ATL 1981 5552 514 1399 480 .206 179 31 80 83 44 1880 .280 .253 .549 145 30 86
CHN 1971 5458 612 1319 576 .181 203 43 130 41 30 1998 .333 .241 .627 103 37 74
CIN 2123 5767 690 1573 638 .184 281 36 106 59 55 2244 .292 .249 .575 142 39 64
HOU 1969 5336 510 1233 473 .177 205 28 66 44 51 1692 .299 .227 .540 115 34 97
LAN 2023 5354 470 1234 434 .187 202 36 67 57 43 1709 .280 .247 .552 89 45 79
NYN 2000 5503 473 1252 434 .204 178 30 81 72 45 1733 .319 .258 .595 104 27 75
PHI 1964 5372 543 1253 505 .208 178 30 100 58 51 1791 .284 .279 .564 106 46 64
PIT 2032 5569 583 1404 538 .175 180 44 80 130 59 1912 .278 .255 .590 133 43 96
SFN 1997 5441 599 1301 566 .193 162 33 108 50 37 1853 .334 .249 .624 117 44 92
SLN 1921 5561 583 1383 539 .192 227 48 73 110 45 1925 .288 .251 .566 91 42 67

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ATL 362 81 81 1474 871 362 6021 1326 87 80.430 478 549 44 11 29 54 5
CHN 384 84 78 1454 894 392 6050 1399 138 81.620 551 611 46 12 32 41 3
CIN 484 83 79 1491 963 573 6345 1399 114 70.120 590 673 24 12 38 60 3
HOU 405 72 90 1449 1021 479 6125 1362 68 66.420 524 588 50 10 23 74 7
LAN 380 76 86 1450 994 414 5951 1293 65 35.430 433 509 38 20 31 43 7
NYN 375 73 89 1485 1014 430 6028 1250 87 47.060 449 499 45 17 32 59 3
PHI 389 76 86 1450 935 421 6072 1416 91 52.030 541 615 42 11 27 30 3
PIT 407 80 82 1487 897 485 6140 1322 73 43.440 453 532 42 17 30 51 4
SFN 330 88 74 1469 942 344 5990 1302 86 42.900 442 529 77 19 16 56 2
SLN 358 97 65 1481 971 375 6006 1282 82 34.720 409 472 63 27 32 30 0

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ATL 2413 7435 5451 1837 147 .950 17692 80 30 1.00 14
CHN 2379 7346 5286 1917 143 .976 17439 51 50 3.00 9
CIN 2451 7453 5403 1882 168 .962 17884 62 48 1.00 19
HOU 2327 7161 5217 1758 186 .958 17365 84 22 0 15
LAN 2454 7287 5267 1851 169 .909 17392 64 59 1.00 17
NYN 2450 7412 5434 1820 158 .979 17798 71 48 0 11
PHI 2355 7283 5269 1865 149 .976 17378 56 56 2.00 19
PIT 2399 7617 5414 2037 166 .933 17845 56 44 2.00 11
SFN 2421 7411 5354 1869 188 .966 17621 93 46 0 23
SLN 2279 7364 5472 1722 170 .961 17752 50 36 1.00 10

West

Central

East

Awards

Silver Slugger

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Tagged:
1968 World Series, Bob Gibson, Curt Flood, Don Drysdale, Don Wilson, Felipe Alou, Gaylord Perry, George Culver, Glenn Beckert, Hank Aaron, Howie Bedell, Johnny Bench, Juan Marichal, Lou Brock, Mickey Lolich, Mike Shannon, Orlando Cepeda, Pete Rose, Phil Regan, Ray Washburn, Richie Allen, Roberto Clemente, St. Louis Cardinals, Tony Taylor, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey

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