TheBaseballPage.com

West Division

East Division

Series Wrapup

Story

The 1970 National League campaign began with Gold Glove centerfielder Curt Flood protesting his offseason trade from St. Louis to Philadelphia by refusing to report to the Phillies.  Flood subsequently chose to pursue an antitrust lawsuit challenging baseball’s reserve clause, which gave team owners the right to trade players against their wishes.  

Flood’s absence made virtually no impact on the N.L. East division race, since both the Phillies and Cardinals finished well out of contention.  The Pittsburgh Pirates captured the first of three consecutive National League East titles, finishing the regular season with a record of 89-73, five games ahead of the runner-up Chicago Cubs.  The defending champion New York Mets slipped to third in the division, six games back, while the Cardinals finished fourth, 13 games behind Pittsburgh.  The Phillies barely edged out Montreal for the fifth-spot, coming in at 15 ½ games off the pace.

Although the Pirates finished just eighth in the National League in runs scored, their lineup featured several of the senior circuit’s top batsmen.  Leadoff hitter Matty Alou batted .297, scored 97 runs, and collected 201 hits.  Even though he appeared in only 108 games, Roberto Clemente batted .352.  Willie Stargell led the team with 31 home runs and 85 runs batted in.  Powerful first baseman Bob Robertson hit 27 homers and drove in 82 runs in only 390 at-bats.  Catcher Manny Sanguillen placed among the league leaders with a .325 batting average.

Meanwhile, Pittsburgh’s underrated pitching staff finished third in the league with a 3.70 team ERA.  Although no one on the team won more than 15 games, five staff members posted double-digit win totals.  Dock Ellis and Luke Walker were the club’s most effective starters.  Ellis won 13 games and compiled a 3.21 ERA.  Walker finished 15-6 with a team-leading 3.04 ERA.  Dave Giusti anchored the bullpen, winning nine games and saving 26 others.

The second-place Chicago Cubs had arguably the league’s best all-around player in Billy Williams.  The Cubs left-fielder earned a second-place finish in the N.L. MVP balloting by placing among the league leaders with 42 home runs, 129 runs batted in, and a .322 batting average, and topping the circuit with 137 runs scored, 205 hits, and 373 total bases

The eventual winner of the league MVP Award came from the N.L. West, where a powerful Cincinnati Reds team put an early end to the division race.  Cincinnati finished the regular season with a record of 102-60, 14 ½ games ahead of the second-place Dodgers, and 16 games in front of the third-place Giants.

San Francisco actually had the league’s most potent offense, topping the circuit with 831 runs scored.  Willie McCovey and Bobby Bonds both had big years for the Giants.  McCovey followed up his 1969 MVP campaign by hitting 39 home runs, knocking in 126 runs, batting .289, scoring 98 runs, and leading the league with 137 walks and a .612 slugging percentage.  Bonds hit 26 round-trippers, batted .302, scored 134 runs, and collected 200 hits.  Unfortunately for the Giants, they also surrendered a league-leading 826 runs to the opposition.  

Wes Parker performed extremely well for the second-place Dodgers.  The slick-fielding first baseman drove in 111 runs, batted .319, and led the league with 47 doubles.  

However, the Reds were the N.L. West’s strongest team, riding their powerful offense to the first of five division titles they captured over the course of the next six years.  Cincinnati topped the senior circuit with 191 home runs and a team batting average of .270.  Leadoff hitter Bobby Tolan hit 16 homers, drove in 80 runs, scored 112 others, batted .316, and led the league with 57 stolen bases.  Hitting out of the number two spot in the batting order, Pete Rose batted .316, scored 120 runs, and tied for the league lead with 205 hits.  Slugging first baseman Lee May hit 34 homers and drove in 94 runs.  Tony Perez earned a third-place finish in the N.L. MVP voting by batting .317, scoring 107 runs, and placing among the league leaders with 40 home runs and 129 runs batted in.  Johnny Bench won the first of his two MVP trophies by topping the circuit with 45 home runs and 148 runs batted in, scoring 97 runs, and batting .293

In spite of their potent offense, the Reds defeated the Pirates in the NLCS largely on the strength of their pitching.  Cincinnati hurlers posted a team ERA of 1.29 during the club’s three-game sweep of Pittsburgh.

The Reds subsequently entered the World Series as favorites against the Baltimore Orioles.  However, Baltimore’s exceptional team balance proved to be too much for the Reds to overcome.  The Orioles took the Fall Classic in five games, with Baltimore’s pitching staff holding Cincinnati’s lineup to a team batting average of only .213.  Meanwhile, the Orioles slugged 10 home runs against Reds pitching, with Brooks Robinson earning Series MVP honors by batting .429, hitting two home runs, driving in six runs, and making several extraordinary defensive plays at third base.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• January 16 - Curt Flood filed a civil lawsuit challenging Major League Baseball's reserve clause, a suit that ended up having historic implications.  Flood refused to report to the Philadelphia Phillies after he was traded by the Cardinals three months earlier, contending the baseball rule violated federal antitrust laws.

• January 17 - The Sporting News named Willie Mays the Player of the Decade for the 1960s.

• May 12 - At Chicago's Wrigley Field, Ernie Banks became the eighth member of the 500 home run club, connecting off Atlanta Braves pitcher Pat Jarvis during a 4-3 11-inning Chicago Cubs win over the Braves.  Banks also drove in his 1,600th career run with the blast.

• May 17 – Hank Aaron collected his 3,000th career hit, making him the founding member of the 3,000-500 Club.

• June 24 - The Cincinnati Reds defeated the San Francisco Giants, 5-4, in the final game the Reds played at Crosley Field.

• June 28 – In the last two games played at Forbes Field, the Pittsburgh Pirates defeated the Chicago Cubs in both games of a doubleheader, 3-2 and 4-1.

• June 30 – Cincinnati’s Riverfront Stadium opened, with the Reds losing to the Atlanta Braves, 8-2.

• July 16 – The Pirates christened their new home ballpark, Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Stadium, with a 4-3 loss to the Cincinnati Reds in front of 48,846 fans.

• July 18 - Willie Mays recorded his 3,000th career hit, joining Hank Aaron as the lone members of the 3,000-500 Club.

• September 3 – Chicago’s Billy Williams asked to be kept out of the Cubs lineup, snapping his National League record streak of 1,117 consecutive games played.  Steve Garvey established a new N.L. record in 1983.

• The Reds averted a sweep in the World Series by winning Game Four on a three-run homer by Lee May, who batted .389 and drove in eight runs in the Fall Classic.

• Bob Gibson won his second Cy Young Award by tying Gaylord Perry for the league lead with 23 wins.  He finished the year with a record of 23-7.  

• Atlanta's Rico Carty hit 25 home runs, drove in 101 runs, and led the league with a .366 batting average and a .456 on-base percentage.

• On April 22, Tom Seaver set a major league record when he struck out 10 San Diego Padres in a row.  He also tied a major league mark by fanning 19 batters in total.  

• Seaver led the National League with 283 strikeouts and a 2.81 ERA.

• The National League won its eighth straight All-Star Game, defeating the American League 5-4 in 12 innings at Cincinnati.  The game ended when Pete Rose bowled over A.L. catcher Ray Fosse at the plate, en route to scoring the winning run.

• Carl Morton of the Expos (18-11, 3.60 ERA and 154 strikeouts) earned N.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Cincinnati's Wayne Granger set a new major league record with 35 saves.

• Rico Carty compiled a 31-game hitting streak.

• Fergie Jenkins established a Cubs record by striking out 274 batters.

• Dock Ellis of Pittsburgh threw a no-hitter against San Diego on June 12.

• Bill Singer of Los Angeles tossed a no-hitter against Philadelphia on July 20.

• Willie Davis of the Dodgers led the major leagues with 16 triples.

• San Francisco’s Gaylord Perry led all N.L. hurlers with 23 wins, five shutouts, and 329 innings pitched.

Seasons of the National League

1876 · 1877 · 1878 · 1879 · 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 · 1884 · 1885 · 1886 · 1887 · 1888 · 1889 · 1890 · 1891 · 1892 · 1893 · 1894 · 1895 · 1896 · 1897 · 1898 · 1899 · 1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904 · 1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 · 1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929 · 1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939 · 1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944 · 1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010  

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ATL 1989 5546 736 1495 692 .218 215 24 160 58 34 2238 .331 .297 .667 140 42 54
CHN 1981 5491 806 1424 761 .189 228 44 179 39 16 2277 .332 .289 .665 110 36 75
CIN 2071 5540 775 1498 726 .210 253 45 191 115 52 2414 .363 .296 .689 119 48 58
HOU 2086 5574 744 1446 694 .195 250 47 129 114 41 2177 .312 .269 .627 144 43 63
LAN 2051 5606 749 1515 695 .209 233 67 87 138 57 2143 .327 .278 .632 114 50 72
MON 2205 5411 687 1284 646 .173 211 35 136 65 45 1973 .304 .234 .558 106 35 107
NYN 2079 5443 695 1358 640 .199 211 42 120 118 54 2013 .312 .282 .613 139 48 74
PHI 2143 5456 594 1299 553 .206 224 58 101 72 64 1942 .316 .276 .608 133 37 62
PIT 2066 5637 729 1522 676 .197 235 70 130 66 34 2287 .337 .268 .670 117 53 53
SDN 2190 5494 681 1353 629 .173 208 36 172 60 45 2149 .296 .258 .608 111 29 83
SFN 2100 5578 831 1460 773 .176 257 35 165 83 27 2282 .336 .253 .611 143 40 66
SLN 2190 5689 744 1497 688 .179 218 51 113 117 47 2156 .370 .231 .645 138 40 52

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ATL 366 76 86 1430 960 478 6179 1451 185 87.400 691 772 45 9 24 44 7
CHN 367 84 78 1437 1000 475 6086 1402 143 109.530 600 679 59 8 25 40 4
CIN 414 102 60 1445 843 592 6184 1370 118 69.900 595 681 32 9 60 43 9
HOU 464 79 83 1456 942 577 6337 1491 131 88.910 685 763 36 5 35 91 5
LAN 388 87 74 1459 880 496 6192 1394 164 60.440 620 684 37 13 42 49 6
MON 447 73 89 1440 914 716 6347 1434 162 99.730 721 807 29 10 32 49 6
NYN 390 83 79 1460 1064 575 6134 1260 135 61.810 561 630 47 10 32 48 7
PHI 438 73 88 1460 1047 538 6294 1483 132 69.240 677 730 24 6 36 52 7
PIT 450 89 73 1455 990 625 6197 1386 106 90.750 599 664 36 12 43 35 3
SDN 441 63 99 1440 886 611 6326 1483 149 90.350 700 788 24 6 32 39 5
SFN 415 86 76 1459 931 604 6408 1514 156 86.050 729 826 50 6 30 76 7
SLN 440 76 86 1474 960 632 6425 1483 102 100.080 665 747 51 10 20 66 7

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ATL 2402 7012 5145 1705 162 .951 17168 124 33 0 30
CHN 2411 7206 5228 1824 154 .945 17221 71 48 1.00 19
CIN 2570 7332 5302 1861 169 .967 17337 46 38 1.00 10
HOU 2526 7244 5240 1833 171 .963 17474 79 58 1.00 12
LAN 2471 7385 5416 1810 159 .959 17502 106 29 0 17
MON 2656 7226 5285 1783 158 .972 17264 78 46 0 12
NYN 2437 7108 5422 1535 151 .976 17516 64 42 0 6
PHI 2509 7151 5406 1603 142 .951 17529 122 46 0 19
PIT 2403 7366 5228 1977 161 .959 17444 64 54 2.00 20
SDN 2502 7244 5220 1835 189 .965 17284 95 46 0 3
SFN 2498 7374 5358 1815 201 .970 17493 113 30 0 30
SLN 2507 7395 5351 1865 179 .957 17708 86 46 0 20

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
Cincinnati Reds 102 60 1803568 1 843
Los Angeles Dodgers 87 74 1697142 2 880
San Francisco Giants 86 76 740720 3 931
Houston Astros 79 83 1253444 4 942
Atlanta Braves 76 86 1078848 5 960
San Diego Padres 63 99 643679 6 886

Central

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
Pittsburg Pirates 89 73 1341947 1 990
Chicago Cubs 84 78 1642705 2 1000
New York Mets 83 79 2697479 3 1064
St. Louis Cardinals 76 86 1629736 4 960
Montreal Expos 73 89 1424683 6 914
Philadelphia Philies 73 88 708247 5 1047

Awards

Silver Slugger

More From Around the Web

This day in baseball history

October 22

  • 2006

    On October 22, 2006, Detroit starter Kenny Rogers is embroil ...

  • 1992

    On October 22, 1992, legendary broadcaster Red Barber dies a ...

  • 1986

    On October 22, 1986, Gary Carter blasted a pair of home runs ...

More Baseball History
Tagged:
1970 World Series, Bill Singer, Billy Williams, Bob Gibson, Bob Robertson, Bobby Bonds, Bobby Tolan, Carl Morton, Cincinnati Reds, Crosley Field, Curt Flood, Dock Ellis, Ernie Banks, Fergie Jenkins, Forbes Field, Gaylord Perry, Hank Aaron, Johnny Bench, Juan Marichal, Lee May, Luke Walker, Manny Sanguillen, Matty Alou, Pat Jarvis, Pete Rose, Pittsburgh Pirates, Rico Carty, Riverfront Stadium, Roberto Clemente, Ron Santo, Three Rivers Stadium, Tom Seaver, Tony Perez, Wayne Granger, Wes Parker, Willie Davis, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Willie Stargell

Comments

    Be respectful, keep it clean.
Login or register to post comments

Share US

Share |