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West Division

East Division

Series Wrapup

Story

The Pittsburgh Pirates captured their fifth N.L. East title in six years in 1975, finishing the regular season with a record of 92-69, 6 ½ games ahead of the second-place Philadelphia Phillies.  The New York Mets and St. Louis Cardinals tied for third in the division, both ending the campaign 10 ½ games behind the first-place Pirates.

The Mets had the league’s best pitcher in Tom Seaver, who won his third Cy Young Award by topping the circuit with 22 victories and 243 strikeouts, while also placing among the leaders with a 2.38 ERA.

Meanwhile, the runner-up Phillies had one of the league’s top batsmen in Greg Luzinski.  The powerfully-built slugger hit 34 home runs, batted .300, and led the National League with 120 runs batted in, en route to earning a second-place finish in the MVP balloting.

The Pirates were the division’s most well-balanced team, tying for third in the league with 712 runs scored, while also finishing second with a team ERA of 3.01.  Jerry Reuss served as staff ace, compiling a record of 18-11 and leading the club with a 2.54 ERA, 15 complete games, and 237 innings pitched.  Al Oliver, Manny Sanguillen, Richie Zisk, Dave Parker, and Willie Stargell paced the Pirates on offense.  Oliver batted .280, drove in 84 runs, and led the team with 90 runs scored.  Sanguillen placed among the league leaders with a .328 batting average.  Zisk hit 20 homers and batted .290.  Parker went deep 25 times, knocked in 101 runs, and batted .308.  Stargell hit 22 home runs, drove in 90 runs, and batted .295.

While the Pirates repeated as champions in the N.L. East, the Cincinnati Reds returned to the top of the Western Division standings after finishing second to the Los Angeles Dodgers the previous year.  The Reds buried the Dodgers and every other team in the West by compiling a regular-season record of 108-54 that left them a full 20 games ahead of second-place Los Angeles in the final standings.

Clearly the National League’s strongest team, the Reds featured a potent offense and an extremely capable pitching staff.  They finished well ahead of every other club in the senior circuit with 840 runs scored and also placed third in the league with a team ERA of 3.37.  Gary Nolan, Jack Billingham, and Don Gullett each posted 15 victories for Cincinnati, with Gullett also compiling an exceptional 2.42 ERA.

The Reds’ powerful lineup continued to be their greatest strength.  Pete Rose batted .317, collected 210 hits, and led the league with 112 runs scored and 47 doubles.  Ken Griffey batted .305 and scored 95 runs.  Tony Perez hit 20 home runs, knocked in 109 runs, and batted .282.  Johnny Bench homered 28 times, placed second in the league with 110 runs batted in, and batted .283.  George Foster added 23 homers and batted .300.  Cincinnati’s top offensive performer was Joe Morgan, who captured league MVP honors for the first of two straight times.  The All-Star second baseman hit 17 home runs, drove in 94 runs, finished among the league leaders with a .327 batting average, 107 runs scored, and 67 stolen bases, and topped the circuit with 132 bases on balls and a .471 on-base percentage.  

Morgan and the rest of Cincinnati’s Big Red Machine had little difficulty disposing of Pittsburgh in three straight games in the NLCS.  The Reds outscored the overmatched Pirates by a combined margin of 19-7, also out-homering them, four to one, and out-hitting them, .284 to .198.

Cincinnati subsequently faced Boston in what turned out to be one of the most exciting World Series ever.  The Reds grabbed a three-games-to-two lead, dropping their two decisions to Red Sox ace Luis Tiant.  Three of the first five contests were decided by one run.

Game Six ended up being the most memorable of the Series, with the two teams battling into the 12th inning.  Boston’s Carlton Fisk put an end to the marathon by hitting a leadoff homer high off Fenway Park’s left field foul pole that sent the Fall Classic to a decisive Game Seven.

After falling behind 3-0 earlier in the contest, the Reds rallied for four unanswered runs over the final four innings to come away with their first world championship since 1940.  Joe Morgan delivered the Series-clinching run with a single in the top of the ninth inning.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• May 4 - At 5:00 AM, New York Mets outfielder Cleon Jones was arrested for indecent exposure in St. Petersburg, Florida after the police found him naked in a van with a white, teenage girl who was in possession of a stash of narcotics.  Although the police later dropped the charges, Mets chairman M. Donald Grant subsequently fined Jones $2,000 - four times as much as a Met had ever been assessed before - and forced him to publicly apologize during a press conference held in New York, with his wife, Angela, by his side.

• September 1 - Mets ace Tom Seaver shut out the Pittsburgh Pirates 3-0, reaching 200 strikeouts for a major league record eighth straight season in the process.

• December 4 - Ted Turner entered a tentative purchase agreement to buy the Atlanta Braves.

• Pete Rose led all World Series players with 10 hits, en route to capturing Series MVP honors.

• Chicago's Bill Madlock won his first batting title with a mark of .354.

• The National League won the All-Star Game 6-3 at Milwaukee.

• San Francisco's John Montefusco won the National League Rookie of the Year Award in a close vote over Montreal's Gary Carter.

• Dodger second baseman Davey Lopes set a new major league record by stealing 38 consecutive bases without being caught.

• Lopes also established a National League record for second basemen by swiping 77 bags.

• In a September 16 game, Rennie Stennett of the Pirates became the first player of the 20th century to go 7-for-7 in a nine-inning game.

• Ed Halicki of the Giants threw a no-hitter against the Mets on August 24.

• Bob Watson of the Astros scored the millionth run in major league history.

• Mike Schmidt led the league with 38 home runs.

• The Reds set a National League record for a 162-game season by winning 108 games.

• Astros pitcher Don Wilson committed suicide prior to the start of the season.

• On August 21, Rick and Paul Reuschel of the Cubs became the only brothers in major league history to pitch a combined shutout.

• Mike Schmidt's 180 strikeouts set a new major league record for third basemen.

• Cardinal Ted Simmons set a new major league record for catchers by collecting 193 hits.

• San Diego's Randy Jones led the National League with a 2.24 ERA.

• Dodger pitcher Andy Messersmith led all N.L. hurlers with 19 complete games and seven shutouts.

• The Dodgers led the major leagues with a 2.92 team ERA.

Seasons of the National League

1876 · 1877 · 1878 · 1879 · 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 · 1884 · 1885 · 1886 · 1887 · 1888 · 1889 · 1890 · 1891 · 1892 · 1893 · 1894 · 1895 · 1896 · 1897 · 1898 · 1899 · 1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904 · 1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 · 1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929 · 1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939 · 1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944 · 1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010  

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ATL 2046 5424 583 1323 541 .217 179 28 107 55 38 1879 .311 .295 .631 139 35 72
CHN 2142 5470 712 1419 645 .193 229 41 95 67 55 2015 .315 .263 .604 112 66 107
CIN 2150 5581 840 1515 779 .199 278 37 124 168 36 2239 .326 .273 .632 122 45 66
HOU 2110 5515 664 1401 606 .200 218 54 84 133 62 1979 .298 .280 .604 118 44 97
LAN 2061 5453 648 1355 606 .218 217 31 118 138 52 1988 .326 .284 .638 123 47 104
MON 2225 5518 601 1346 542 .207 216 31 98 108 58 1918 .339 .288 .653 110 38 110
NYN 2061 5587 646 1430 604 .201 217 34 101 32 26 2018 .360 .259 .645 143 37 75
PHI 2218 5592 735 1506 687 .221 283 42 125 126 57 2248 .374 .296 .708 114 42 88
PIT 2054 5489 712 1444 669 .191 255 47 138 49 28 2207 .302 .263 .583 124 40 76
SDN 2162 5429 552 1324 505 .199 215 22 78 85 50 1817 .335 .264 .623 128 46 133
SFN 2044 5447 659 1412 606 .183 235 45 84 99 47 1989 .298 .249 .555 139 51 62
SLN 2136 5597 662 1527 619 .202 239 46 81 116 49 2101 .340 .261 .646 137 45 92

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ATL 428 67 94 1431 669 519 6279 1543 101 76.820 624 739 32 3 24 55 17
CHN 460 75 87 1444 850 551 6383 1587 130 102.100 732 827 27 5 33 35 9
CIN 439 108 54 1460 663 487 6158 1422 112 37.340 546 586 22 4 50 49 10
HOU 427 64 97 1457 839 679 6337 1436 106 62.120 656 711 39 6 25 83 15
LAN 331 88 74 1470 894 448 6015 1215 104 56.530 477 534 51 17 21 34 10
MON 433 75 87 1480 831 665 6430 1448 102 66.020 614 690 30 9 25 65 12
NYN 391 82 80 1467 989 580 6190 1344 99 70.310 552 625 40 13 31 48 20
PHI 445 86 76 1456 897 546 6140 1353 111 65.530 618 694 33 9 30 50 20
PIT 387 92 69 1439 768 551 6072 1302 79 36.280 482 565 43 11 31 37 11
SDN 452 71 91 1465 713 521 6314 1494 99 64.650 570 683 40 10 20 44 9
SFN 420 80 81 1432 856 612 6211 1406 92 61.690 595 671 37 9 24 51 15
SLN 435 82 80 1456 824 571 6304 1452 98 84.700 578 689 33 11 36 55 5

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ATL 2349 7484 5372 1910 202 .968 17159 147 44 0 35
CHN 2481 7507 5358 1943 206 .966 17332 93 54 1.00 15
CIN 2562 7466 5534 1813 119 .974 17508 61 29 0 3
HOU 2442 7526 5429 1936 161 .971 17498 125 65 0 30
LAN 2495 7319 5487 1684 148 .974 17637 68 33 0 17
MON 2570 7686 5479 1994 213 .960 17760 78 46 0 20
NYN 2435 7425 5461 1790 174 .956 17590 116 63 0 8
PHI 2617 7451 5437 1836 178 .955 17462 69 52 1.00 10
PIT 2321 7400 5402 1824 174 .921 17250 81 35 0 19
SDN 2535 7641 5472 1953 216 .942 17560 118 51 0 7
SFN 2382 7266 5284 1813 169 .956 17191 114 47 0 13
SLN 2513 7470 5524 1744 202 .955 17457 110 39 0 31

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
Cincinnati Reds 108 54 2315603 1 663
Los Angeles Dodgers 88 74 2539349 2 894
San Francisco Giants 80 81 522919 3 856
San Diego Padres 71 91 1281747 4 713
Atlanta Braves 67 94 534672 5 669
Houston Astros 64 97 858002 6 839

Central

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
Pittsburg Pirates 92 69 1270018 1 768
Philadelphia Philies 86 76 1909233 2 897
St. Louis Cardinals 82 80 1695270 3 824
New York Mets 82 80 1730566 3 989
Montreal Expos 75 87 908292 5 831
Chicago Cubs 75 87 1034819 5 850

Awards

Silver Slugger

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Tagged:
1975 NLCS, 1975 World Series, Al Oliver, Andy Messersmith, Bill Madlock, Bob Watson, Carlton Fisk, Cincinnati Reds, Cleon Jones, Dave Parker, Davey Lopes, Don Gullett, Don Wilson, Ed Halicki, Gary Carter, Gary Nolan, George Foster, Greg Luzinski, Jack Billingham, Jerry Reuss, Joe Morgan, John Montefusco, Johnny Bench, Ken Griffey, Lou Brock, Luis Tiant, Manny Sanguillen, Mike Schmidt, Pete Rose, Pittsburgh Pirates, Randy Jones, Rennie Stennett, Richie Zisk, Rick Reuschel, Ted Simmons, Ted Turner, Tom Seaver, Tony Perez, Willie Stargell

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