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West Division

East Division

Series Wrapup

Story

The Philadelphia Phillies used their powerful offense to capture their second consecutive N.L. East title in 1977, posting a regular season record of 101-61 that left them five games ahead of the runner-up Pittsburgh Pirates.  The Phillies topped the senior circuit with 847 runs scored, a .279 team batting average, a .346 team on-base percentage, and a .448 team slugging average, and they also finished second in the league with 186 home runs.

Mike Schmidt and Greg Luzinski led the Philadelphia attack.  Schmidt drove in 101 runs and placed among the league leaders with 38 home runs, 114 runs scored, and 104 bases on balls.  Luzinski batted .309, scored 99 runs, and finished second in the league with 39 homers and 130 runs batted in.  Larry Bowa and Garry Maddox added speed at the top of the batting order.  Bowa batted .280, scored 93 runs, and stole 32 bases.  Maddox hit .292, scored 85 times, and swiped 22 bags.

Philadelphia also had the senior circuit’s top pitcher in Steve Carlton, who earned Cy Young honors for the second time in his career by leading all N.L. hurlers with 23 victories.  Carlton also finished among the league leaders with a 2.64 ERA, 283 innings pitched, and 17 complete games.  Larry Christenson served as the number two man in Philadelphia’s starting rotation, compiling an outstanding record of 19-6.

While the Phillies’ potent offense earned them a postseason berth, the Los Angeles Dodgers rode the league’s best pitching staff to a spot in the playoffs.  The Dodgers posted a league-leading team ERA of 3.22, en route to finishing the campaign with a record of 98-64, 10 full games ahead of the two-time defending world champion Cincinnati Reds. 

Cincinnati still had one of the best lineups in baseball.  Johnny Bench hit 31 homers and knocked in 109 runs.  Joe Morgan homered 22 times, scored 113 runs, stole 49 bases, and compiled a .417 on-base percentage.  Pete Rose batted .311 and scored 95 runs.  Ken Griffey batted .318 and crossed the plate 117 times.  George Foster earned N.L. MVP honors by batting .320 and topping the circuit with 52 home runs, 149 runs batted in, 124 runs scored, 388 total bases, and a .631 slugging percentage.

However, the Dodgers’ superior pitching enabled them to dethrone the Reds as N.L. West champs.  Tommy John headed the Los Angeles staff, compiling a record of 20-7 with an outstanding 2.78 ERA.  Rick Rhoden finished second on the team with 16 victories.  Don Sutton and Doug Rau gave the Dodgers a pair of 14-game winners.  Although Burt Hooton won only 12 games, he posted a team-leading 2.62 ERA. 

Not to be outdone, the Dodger offense also performed extremely well over the course of the regular season.  Los Angeles led the National League with 191 home runs and finished third in the circuit with 769 runs scored.  Dusty Baker, Ron Cey, Steve Garvey, and Reggie Smith each surpassed 30 homers, combining to hit a total of 125 round-trippers between them.  Baker left the yard 30 times, drove in 86 runs, and batted .291.  Cey also homered 30 times, and he finished second on the team with 110 runs batted in.  Garvey batted .297, scored 91 runs, and led the club with 33 home runs, 115 runs batted in, and 192 hits.  Smith hit 32 homers, knocked in 87 runs, finished first on the team with 104 runs scored and a .307 batting average, and led the league with a .432 on-base percentage.

The Dodgers subsequently handed the Phillies their second straight NLCS loss, defeating them in four games.  Philadelphia won Game One, but Los Angeles took the next three contests, winning Game Three, 6-5, by scoring three runs with two men out in the top of the ninth inning.  Dusty Baker earned Series MVP honors by batting .357, hitting two homers, and driving in eight runs.

Los Angeles fell behind New York three-games-to-one in the World Series before creating a glimmer of hope by defeating the Yankees 10-4 in Game Five.  However, a memorable three-home-run performance by Reggie Jackson in Game Six led New York to an 8-4, Series-clinching victory.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• January 2 - Not even a full season into owning the Atlanta Braves, Ted Turner found himself suspended by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn for tampering with the signing of Gary Matthews.

• June 15 – Frustrated by salary disputes with Tom Seaver, the Mets traded the star pitcher to the Cincinnati Reds for four players – pitcher Pat Zachry, second baseman Doug Flynn, and outfielders Steve Henderson and Dan Norman.  In what became known as the “Midnight Massacre,” the Mets then traded Mike Phillips to St. Louis for Joel Youngblood, before also shipping Dave Kingman to San Diego for Bobby Valentine and minor league pitcher Paul Siebert.

• June 29 - Willie Stargell hit his 400th career home run during a 9-1 Pittsburgh Pirates victory over the St. Louis Cardinals.

• August 21 – Tom Seaver took the mound against the Mets for the first time in his career, in front of 46,265 fans at Shea Stadium.  Seaver and the Reds defeated the Mets by a score of 5-1.

• August 29 - St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Lou Brock stole two bases during a 4–3 loss to the San Diego Padres.  The second theft gave Brock 893 steals for his career, allowing him to surpass Ty Cobb for the top spot on the all-time list.

• Montreal’s Andre Dawson (19 home runs, 65 RBIs, .282 batting average) earned N.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• Tom Seaver compiled a record of 14-3 after joining the Reds in mid-June.  He finished the year with an overall mark of 21-6.

• Ted Simmons batted .318, hit 21 homers, and drove in 95 runs for the Cardinals.

• Bruce Sutter finished 7-3 with 31 saves for the Cubs.  He allowed just 69 hits in 107 innings of work, while striking out 129 batters and compiling an ERA of 1.35.

• The Dodgers became the first team in history to boast four players with at least 30 home runs - Ron Cey, Steve Garvey, Dusty Baker, and Reggie Smith.

• The National League won the All-Star Game 7-5 at Yankee Stadium.

• Pittsburgh’s John Candelaria led the league with a 2.34 ERA and a winning percentage of .800 (20-5).

• The Cubs traded Bill Madlock and Rob Sperring to the Giants for Bobby Murcer and two other players.

• Danny Frisella of Atlanta was killed in a dune buggy accident.

• Olympic Stadium opened on April 15, featuring a match-up between the Expos and the Phillies.

• Phil Niekro led the National League with 262 strikeouts and 20 complete games.

• Pittsburgh’s Frank Taveras led the league with 70 stolen bases.

• Pirate teammate Dave Parker hit 21 home runs, knocked in 88 runs, scored 107 others, and led the league with a .338 batting average, 215 hits, and 44 doubles. 

Seasons of the National League

1876 · 1877 · 1878 · 1879 · 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 · 1884 · 1885 · 1886 · 1887 · 1888 · 1889 · 1890 · 1891 · 1892 · 1893 · 1894 · 1895 · 1896 · 1897 · 1898 · 1899 · 1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904 · 1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 · 1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929 · 1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939 · 1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944 · 1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010  

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ATL 2196 5534 678 1404 638 .215 218 20 139 82 53 2079 .342 .287 .693 135 34 83
CHN 2198 5604 692 1489 649 .181 271 37 111 64 45 2167 .306 .248 .616 142 52 69
CIN 2114 5524 802 1513 750 .197 269 42 181 170 64 2409 .299 .307 .636 112 50 62
HOU 2060 5530 680 1405 638 .184 263 60 114 187 72 2130 .265 .249 .529 98 39 76
LAN 2181 5589 769 1484 729 .212 223 28 191 114 62 2336 .345 .288 .692 103 44 83
MON 2134 5675 665 1474 622 .168 294 50 138 88 50 2282 .279 .243 .569 125 39 69
NYN 2148 5410 587 1319 525 .192 227 30 88 98 81 1870 .291 .249 .570 136 37 63
PHI 2169 5546 847 1548 795 .224 266 56 186 135 68 2484 .349 .328 .709 121 74 59
PIT 2151 5662 734 1550 678 .218 278 57 133 260 120 2341 .318 .314 .664 96 43 49
SDN 2318 5602 692 1397 652 .171 245 49 120 133 57 2100 .304 .245 .582 102 30 90
SFN 2189 5497 673 1392 624 .193 227 41 134 90 59 2103 .322 .276 .638 118 51 78
SLN 2230 5527 737 1490 686 .191 252 56 96 134 112 2142 .341 .253 .651 111 29 66

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ATL 489 61 101 1447 915 701 6535 1581 169 137.100 782 895 28 4 31 64 19
CHN 481 81 81 1468 942 489 6254 1500 128 111.780 655 739 16 6 44 55 17
CIN 423 88 74 1436 868 544 6187 1469 156 110.480 673 725 33 10 32 54 9
HOU 396 81 81 1467 871 545 6196 1384 110 48.260 577 650 37 7 28 46 17
LAN 400 98 64 1474 930 438 6122 1393 119 50.680 528 582 34 11 39 35 4
MON 469 75 87 1481 856 579 6333 1426 135 78.100 660 736 31 9 33 50 6
NYN 410 64 98 1435 911 490 6061 1378 118 61.470 602 663 27 10 28 25 16
PHI 408 101 61 1455 856 482 6128 1451 134 47.300 600 668 31 4 47 44 17
PIT 440 96 66 1481 890 485 6211 1406 149 62.220 594 665 25 6 39 44 12
SDN 544 69 93 1467 827 673 6477 1556 160 76.130 725 834 6 2 44 46 25
SFN 474 75 87 1458 854 529 6273 1501 114 48.680 609 711 27 7 33 34 6
SLN 467 83 79 1445 768 532 6128 1420 139 68.950 612 688 26 8 31 43 9

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ATL 2495 7291 5356 1736 199 .954 17348 205 83 0 34
CHN 2543 7561 5261 2133 167 .960 17615 134 85 0 8
CIN 2487 7232 5430 1695 107 .968 17246 87 54 0 7
HOU 2436 7526 5474 1892 160 .979 17589 143 80 1.00 24
LAN 2619 7369 5329 1900 140 .967 17704 108 59 0 13
MON 2502 7570 5537 1880 153 .964 17772 135 63 1.00 12
NYN 2547 7200 5406 1636 158 .941 17204 127 70 0 11
PHI 2595 7525 5395 1989 141 .958 17460 119 62 0 4
PIT 2553 7630 5629 1822 179 .977 17777 102 63 0 13
SDN 2613 7663 5541 1898 224 .953 17595 120 87 1.00 21
SFN 2619 7534 5529 1786 219 .958 17507 158 75 1.00 9
SLN 2708 7470 5419 1883 168 .953 17344 117 62 0 10

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
Los Angeles Dodgers 98 64 2955087 1 930
Cincinnati Reds 88 74 2519670 2 868
Houston Astros 81 81 1109560 3 871
San Francisco Giants 75 87 700056 4 854
San Diego Padres 69 93 1376269 5 827
Atlanta Braves 61 101 872464 6 915

Central

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
Philadelphia Philies 101 61 2700070 1 856
Pittsburg Pirates 96 66 1237349 2 890
St. Louis Cardinals 83 79 1659287 3 768
Chicago Cubs 81 81 1439834 4 942
Montreal Expos 75 87 1433757 5 856
New York Mets 64 98 1066825 6 911

Awards

Silver Slugger

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Tagged:
1977 NLCS, 1977 World Series, Andre Dawson, Bill Madlock, Bill Russell, Bobby Murcer, Bobby Valentine, Bruce Sutter, Burt Hooton, Dan Norman, Danny Frisella, Dave Kingman, Dave Parker, Davey Lopes, Don Sutton, Doug Flynn, Doug Rau, Dusty Baker, Frank Taveras, Garry Maddox, Gary Matthews, George Foster, Greg Luzinski, Joe Morgan, Joel Youngblood, John Candelaria, Johnny Bench, Ken Griffey, Larry Bowa, Larry Christenson, Los Angeles Dodgers, Lou Brock, Mike Schmidt, Pat Zachry, Pete Rose, Phil Niekro, Philadelphia Phillies, Reggie Jackson, Reggie Smith, Rick Rhoden, Ron Cey, Steve Carlton, Steve Garvey, Steve Henderson, Ted Simmons, Ted Turner, Tom Seaver, Tommy John, Willie Stargell

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