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West Division

East Division

Series Wrapup

Story

The 1984 National League campaign provided several surprises, not the least of which ended up being the two division winners.  The Chicago Cubs and San Diego Padres both earned their maiden division titles, with the Cubs fending off a young and improving New York Mets team in the East and the Padres winning by a comfortable margin in the West.

The Padres, who previously posted just one winning record in their 15-year existence, emerged victorious in the decidedly mediocre N.L. West, finishing the season with a record of 92-70, 12 games ahead of both the Atlanta Braves and the Houston Astros.  Although the Padres had neither the league’s top offense, nor its best pitching staff, they had one of the circuit’s finest all-around players in Tony Gwynn.  The 24-year-old right-fielder scored 88 runs and led the league with 213 hits and a .351 batting average, en route to earning a third-place finish in the N.L. MVP voting.

The Braves also had one of the league’s best players in Dale Murphy, who finished tied for the league lead with 36 homers, knocked in 100 runs, scored 94 others, batted .290, and topped the circuit with a .547 slugging percentage.

The National League’s Eastern Division provided far more intrigue as the season wore on, with a youthful New York Mets squad pursuing the Chicago Cubs throughout the summer months.  The Cubs ended up winning the division by 6 ½ games over the Mets, concluding the campaign with a record of 96-65.  By doing so, they advanced to the postseason for the first time in almost 40 years.  Nevertheless, the Mets served notice that they were a team to be reckoned with moving forward.  

New York’s 90-72 record represented a 22-game improvement over their 68-win, last-place finish from the previous season.  Young stars such as Darryl Strawberry and Dwight Gooden contributed greatly to the team's progression.  Strawberry hit 26 home runs and drove in 97 runs, while Gooden earned N.L. Rookie of the Year honors by finishing 17-9, with a 2.60 ERA and a league-leading 276 strikeouts.  Veteran first baseman Keith Hernandez provided leadership to his younger teammates, while also having an extremely solid year on the field.  Hernandez hit 15 home runs, knocked in 94 runs, batted .311, and compiled a .415 on-base percentage.  The writers acknowledged the overall contributions Hernandez made to the Mets by awarding him a second-place finish in the league MVP balloting.

Copping the honor was Chicago second baseman Ryne Sandberg, who hit 19 home runs, drove in 84 runs, batted .314, stole 32 bases, collected 200 hits, and topped the circuit with 114 runs scored and 19 triples.  Sandberg received a considerable amount of help from his Chicago teammates.  Former Dodger third baseman Ron Cey hit 25 home runs and drove in 97 runs.  Catcher Jody Davis hit 19 homers and knocked in 94 runs.  First baseman Leon Durham hit 23 four-baggers and drove in 96 runs.  Outfielder Gary Matthews batted .291, scored 101 runs, and led the league with 103 walks and a .417 on-base percentage.  Lee Smith won nine games in relief and finished second in the league with 33 saves.  After coming over from Cleveland during the season's first half, right-hander Rick Sutcliffe was the National League's best pitcher.  Following a 4-5 start with the Indians, Sutcliffe subsequently posted a record of 16-1 and an ERA of 2.69 with the Cubs, en route to earning N.L. Cy Young honors. 

Chicago started off the NLCS extremely well against San Diego, winning the first two contests by scores of 13-0 and 4-2.  However, the momentum of the Series shifted when the two teams traveled to Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego.  After the Padres took Game Three by a score of 7-1, Steve Garvey evened the Series at two games apiece by breaking a 5-5 tie with a two-run homer off Lee Smith in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game Four.  The Cubs jumped out to an early 3-0 lead in Game Five, but the Padres came storming back, scoring six unanswered runs to come away with a pennant-clinching 6-3 victory.  Garvey’s home run, seven RBIs, and .400 batting average earned him NLCS MVP honors.

However, San Diego proved to be no match for Detroit in the World Series, losing the Fall Classic in five games.  The Padres played well in the early stages of the Series, dropping a one-run decision in the opening contest, before winning Game Two by a score of 5-3.  But the Tigers won the next three games in convincing fashion, denying the Padres their first world championship.
 
Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• April 21 – Pete Rose collected his 4,000th hit, joining Ty Cobb on an extremely exclusive list.

• April 29 – Pitching for the Philadelphia Phillies, Jerry Koosman stepped on the mound at Shea Stadium for the first time in his career against the New York Mets.  The Mets won the game, 6-2.

• June 23 - At Wrigley Field, the Chicago Cubs and rival St. Louis Cardinals locked up in a memorable slugfest.  With Chicago trailing the game 9-8 in the bottom of the ninth inning, Ryne Sandberg delivered a game-tying home run off Bruce Sutter.  After the Cardinals subsequently regained the lead by scoring two runs in the top of the 10th, Sandberg tied the game again by hitting a two-out two-run homer against Sutter in the bottom of the frame.  The Cubs went on to win the contest 12-11 in 11 innings. 

• December 12 - The Montreal Expos traded future Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter to the New York Mets for shortstop Hubie Brooks, catcher Mike Fitzgerald, outfielder Herm Winningham, and pitching prospect Floyd Youmans.

• The National League won the All-Star Game 4-3 at San Francisco, as 19-year-old Dwight Gooden struck out the side in the first inning he pitched.

• Cardinal Bruce Sutter tied the major league record with 45 saves.

• Pete Rose established a major league record by amassing 100 or more hits for a 22nd consecutive year.

• Rose set a new major league record by playing in his 3,309th game.

• Steve Carlton won his 300th game.

• Mike Schmidt tied for the league lead with 36 home runs and 106 runs batted in.

• St. Louis' Joaquin Andujar led the National League with 20 wins.

• Dwight Gooden fanned 16 batters in two consecutive starts to set the new modern record for most strikeouts in two straight starts (32).

• Houston's Dickie Thon was beaned, damaging his vision and adversely affecting his hitting ability for the remainder of his career.

• Cleveland traded Rick Sutcliffe, Ron Hassey, and George Frazier to the Cubs for Joe Carter, Mel Hall, and a minor leaguer.

• Joe Morgan's 265th career homer broke Rogers Hornsby's record for second basemen.

• Steve Garvey's 1.000 fielding average established a new major league record for first basemen.

• Montreal’s Tim Raines edged out Philadelphia’s Juan Samuel for the stolen base title (75-72).

• Alejandro Pena of Los Angeles led all N.L. hurlers with a 2.49 ERA.

Seasons of the National League

1876 · 1877 · 1878 · 1879 · 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 · 1884 · 1885 · 1886 · 1887 · 1888 · 1889 · 1890 · 1891 · 1892 · 1893 · 1894 · 1895 · 1896 · 1897 · 1898 · 1899 · 1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904 · 1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 · 1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929 · 1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939 · 1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944 · 1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010  

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ATL 2079 5422 632 1338 578 .210 234 27 111 140 85 1959 .349 .271 .661 113 45 64
CHN 2183 5437 762 1415 703 .197 240 47 136 154 66 2157 .306 .272 .593 102 51 59
CIN 2256 5498 627 1342 578 .190 238 30 106 160 63 1958 .305 .257 .598 99 53 71
HOU 2137 5548 693 1465 640 .210 222 67 79 105 61 2058 .307 .286 .611 88 55 87
LAN 2219 5399 580 1316 530 .172 213 23 102 109 69 1881 .283 .230 .557 120 48 92
MON 2187 5439 593 1367 553 .180 242 36 96 131 38 1969 .296 .239 .576 101 34 74
NYN 2146 5438 652 1400 607 .200 235 25 107 149 54 2006 .325 .267 .623 132 49 59
PHI 2302 5614 720 1494 673 .188 248 51 147 186 60 2285 .322 .270 .654 140 46 39
PIT 2062 5537 615 1412 586 .190 237 33 98 96 62 2009 .301 .260 .611 131 44 81
SDN 2132 5504 686 1425 629 .213 207 42 109 152 68 2043 .314 .312 .660 132 55 64
SFN 2273 5650 682 1499 646 .200 229 26 112 126 76 2116 .307 .264 .587 141 44 51
SLN 2228 5433 652 1369 610 .210 225 44 75 220 71 1907 .294 .269 .579 120 46 68

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ATL 440 80 82 1448 859 525 6127 1401 122 56.460 574 655 17 3 49 37 14
CHN 432 96 65 1433 879 442 6053 1458 99 82.380 598 658 19 5 50 40 10
CIN 489 70 92 1461 946 578 6298 1445 128 86.00.00 676 747 25 4 25 33 7
HOU 474 80 82 1449 950 502 6064 1350 91 41.720 536 630 24 7 29 45 11
LAN 421 79 83 1461 1033 499 6134 1381 76 45.550 515 600 39 13 27 41 11
MON 433 78 83 1431 861 474 5956 1333 114 53.590 526 585 19 5 48 40 13
NYN 440 90 72 1444 1028 573 6141 1371 104 71.500 582 676 12 6 50 41 20
PHI 449 81 81 1458 904 448 6179 1416 101 68.240 586 690 11 2 35 41 27
PIT 408 75 87 1467 995 502 6095 1344 102 56.320 508 567 27 8 34 43 16
SDN 447 92 70 1462 812 563 6162 1327 122 50.150 565 634 13 7 44 44 13
SFN 521 66 96 1460 854 549 6428 1589 125 70.200 713 807 9 3 38 58 21
SLN 475 84 78 1448 808 494 6071 1427 94 83.790 577 645 19 9 51 50 20

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ATL 2445 7443 5282 1996 165 .959 17364 155 63 0 7
CHN 2662 7367 5339 1881 147 .961 17204 134 69 1.00 10
CIN 2686 7379 5546 1664 169 .970 17535 149 70 0 18
HOU 2467 7382 5359 1871 152 .976 17391 188 68 0 38
LAN 2641 7440 5312 1947 181 .958 17529 132 74 0 11
MON 2578 7242 5398 1693 151 .957 17173 138 67 0 8
NYN 2442 7228 5417 1661 150 .946 17315 150 64 0 14
PHI 2698 7473 5474 1814 185 .961 17502 145 50 1.00 10
PIT 2515 7499 5512 1838 149 .974 17637 115 71 1.00 6
SDN 2494 7452 5619 1674 159 .969 17527 125 46 0 12
SFN 2572 7556 5472 1880 204 .968 17531 172 66 0 18
SLN 2682 7499 5315 2045 139 .974 17384 125 65 0 14

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
San Diego Padres 92 70 1983904 1 812
Houston Astros 80 82 1229862 2 950
Atlanta Braves 80 82 1724892 2 859
Los Angeles Dodgers 79 83 3134824 4 1033
Cincinnati Reds 70 92 1275887 5 946
San Francisco Giants 66 96 1001545 6 854

Central

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
Chicago Cubs 96 65 2107655 1 879
New York Mets 90 72 1842695 2 1028
St. Louis Cardinals 84 78 2037448 3 808
Philadelphia Philies 81 81 2062693 4 904
Montreal Expos 78 83 1606531 5 861
Pittsburg Pirates 75 87 773500 6 995

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Tagged:
1984 NLCS, 1984 World Series, Alejandro Pena, Bruce Sutter, Chicago Cubs, Dale Murphy, Darryl Strawberry, Dickie Thon, Dwight Gooden, Floyd Youmans, Gary Carter, Gary Matthews, George Frazier, Herm Winningham, Hubie Brooks, Jerry Koosman, Joaquin Andujar, Jody Davis, Joe Carter, Joe Morgan, Juan Samuel, Keith Hernandez, Lee Smith, Leon Durham, Mel Hall, Mike Fitzgerald, Mike Schmidt, Pete Rose, Rick Sutcliffe, Ron Cey, Ron Hassey, Ryne Sandberg, San Diego Padres, Steve Carlton, Steve Garvey, Tim Raines, Tony Gwynn

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