TheBaseballPage.com

West Division

East Division

Series Wrapup

Story

The Cincinnati Reds turned out to be the National League’s surprise team in 1990, holding onto first place in the Western Division the entire year even though they concluded the campaign with a relatively modest 91-71 record.  After placing second in the West in four of the previous five seasons, the Reds captured their first division title since 1979 by finishing five games ahead of the runner-up Los Angeles Dodgers and six games in front of the third-place San Francisco Giants.

Without a true superstar, Cincinnati combined solid pitching, strong defense, and a deep lineup to advance to the postseason for the first time in 11 years.  The Reds topped the senior circuit with a .265 team batting average, committed fewer errors than any other team (102), and placed second in the league with a team ERA of 3.39.

Eric Davis, Barry Larkin, and Chris Sabo paced Cincinnati on offense.  Davis hit 24 homers, drove in 86 runs, and scored 84 others.  Larkin batted .301, scored 85 runs, and stole 30 bases.  Sabo stole 25 bases and led the team with 25 home runs and 95 runs scored.    

Tom Browning and Jose Rijo led the pitching staff with 15 and 14 victories, respectively.  Rijo also placed among the league leaders with a 2.70 ERA.  The Reds’ greatest strength, though, was their formidable bullpen duo of Randy Myers and Rob Dibble, who became known as the “Nasty Boys” over the course of the season.  Myers saved 31 games, compiled a 2.08 ERA, and struck out 98 batters in 87 innings of work.  Dibble won eight games, saved 11 others, posted an ERA of 1.74, and fanned 136 batters over 98 innings.  

Although the Dodgers and Giants lacked Cincinnati’s overall team depth, they both boasted superior lineups.  Eddie Murray paced Los Angeles on offense, hitting 26 home runs, knocking in 95 runs, scoring 96 others, and finishing second in the league with a .330 batting average.  Meanwhile, San Francisco had the division's most potent offensive weapon in Matt Williams.  The Giants' third baseman hit 33 home runs, batted .277, and topped the circuit with 122 runs batted in.  Brett Butler and reigning N.L. MVP Kevin Mitchell provided a considerable amount of support to Williams in the San Francisco batting order.  Butler batted .309, scored 108 runs, stole 51 bases, and led the N.L. with 192 hits.  Mitchell hit 35 home runs, knocked in 93 runs, and batted .290.
 
Just as the Reds did in the West, the Pittsburgh Pirates advanced to the playoffs for the first time since 1979 by capturing the Eastern Division title with a mark of 95-67 that placed them four games ahead of the second-place New York Mets in the final standings.  Featuring the league’s second-highest scoring offense and third-best pitching staff, the Pirates benefited from having three of the senior circuit’s top performers grace their roster.  Doug Drabek earned N.L. Cy Young honors by compiling an ERA of 2.76 and leading the league with a record of 22-6.  Meanwhile, Bobby Bonilla and Barry Bonds paced the Pirates on offense.  Bonilla batted .280 and finished among the league leaders with 32 home runs, 120 runs batted in, and 112 runs scored.  He placed second in the N.L. MVP balloting.  Bonds won the award by hitting 33 homers, driving in 114 runs, scoring 104 others, batting .301, stealing 52 bases, and leading the league with a .565 slugging average.

Also placing high in the voting were New York’s Darryl Strawberry and Chicago’s Ryne Sandberg.  Strawberry batted .277, hit 37 home runs, and knocked in 108 runs for the Mets.  Sandberg had arguably his finest all-around season for the fifth-place Cubs, who finished 18 games off the pace in the East.  The second baseman placed among the league leaders with 100 runs batted in and a .306 batting average, and he topped the circuit with 40 home runs, 116 runs scored, and 344 total bases.

The National League Championship Series turned out to be extremely competitive, with Cincinnati defeating Pittsburgh in six games.  Four of the six contests were decided by one run, with Cincinnati’s “Nasty Boys” proving to be the difference.  Randy Myers and Rob Dibble combined to work a total of 10 2/3 scoreless innings, surrendering only two hits to the Pirates and saving all four of Cincinnati’s wins.  They shared NLCS MVP honors.

Myers and Dibble continued their exceptional work against the Oakland Athletics in the World Series, working a combined total of 7 2/3 scoreless innings during Cincinnati’s unexpected four-game sweep of the heavily-favored A’s.  The Reds dominated the A’s in every aspect of the game, outscoring them by a combined margin of 22-8.  Jose Rijo earned Series MVP honors by posting two of Cincinnati’s four victories, while compiling a 0.59 ERA.  Billy Hatcher netted seven hits in his first seven at-bats for the Reds, establishing an all-time record in Series play by batting .750.  Chris Sabo also performed brilliantly for Cincinnati, batting .563, hitting two homers, and driving in five runs.   

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• June 14 – The National League announced it intended to expand from 12 to 14 teams in 1993.

• July 5 - Whitey Herzog resigned his managerial post with the St. Louis Cardinals, ending an 11-year association with the ball club that saw him compile an overall record of 1,281-1,125, for a .532 winning percentage.

• October 20 – The Cincinnati Reds completed their four-game World Series sweep of the Oakland Athletics with a 2-1 victory in Oakland.  Series MVP Jose Rijo retired the last 20 batters he faced, before turning the ball over to Randy Myers in the ninth inning.  The victory gave the Reds their first world championship since 1976.  However, Eric Davis failed to take part in the celebration since he ruptured his kidney diving for a ball during the game.  It subsequently took Davis several years to fully recover.

• November 23 - Former Philadelphia Phillies and Cincinnati Reds catcher Bo Díaz, 37, was crushed to death when a rooftop satellite dish toppled over at his home in Venezuela.

• Willie McGee, traded from St. Louis to Oakland in August, still won the National League batting title with a mark of .335.

• Vince Coleman led the league in steals (77) for the sixth straight time.

• Barry Bonds became the first player to hit .300 with 30 homers, 100 runs batted in, and 50 stolen bases in the same year.

• Chicago’s Andre Dawson became the second player in major league history to compile 2,000 hits, 300 homers, and 300 steals (Willie Mays was the first).

• Dodger Fernando Valenzuela threw a no-hitter against St. Louis on June 29.

• Philadelphia's Terry Mulholland tossed a no-hitter against San Francisco on August 15.

• Houston's Danny Darwin led the National League with a 2.21 ERA.

• New York's David Cone led the league with 233 strikeouts.

• Atlanta's David Justice (28 homers) earned N.L. Rookie of the Year honors.

• New York’s Frank Viola finished the season with a 20-12 record, a 2.67 ERA, and a league-leading 249 innings pitched.

Seasons of the National League

1876 · 1877 · 1878 · 1879 · 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 · 1884 · 1885 · 1886 · 1887 · 1888 · 1889 · 1890 · 1891 · 1892 · 1893 · 1894 · 1895 · 1896 · 1897 · 1898 · 1899 · 1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904 · 1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 · 1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929 · 1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939 · 1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944 · 1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010  

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ATL 2215 5504 682 1376 636 .194 263 26 162 92 55 2177 .308 .279 .619 101 31 49
CHN 2257 5600 690 1474 649 .173 240 36 136 151 50 2194 .314 .240 .592 100 51 61
CIN 2169 5525 693 1466 644 .204 284 40 125 166 66 2205 .328 .276 .671 99 42 88
HOU 2300 5379 573 1301 536 .179 209 32 94 179 83 1856 .341 .242 .625 107 41 79
LAN 2332 5491 728 1436 669 .160 222 27 129 141 65 2099 .281 .241 .608 110 48 71
MON 2263 5453 662 1363 607 .183 227 43 114 235 99 2018 .304 .247 .607 96 47 87
NYN 2145 5504 775 1410 734 .219 278 21 172 110 33 2246 .320 .313 .669 89 56 54
PHI 2248 5535 646 1410 619 .186 237 27 103 108 35 2010 .289 .254 .575 115 39 59
PIT 2224 5388 733 1395 693 .180 288 42 138 137 52 2181 .275 .278 .590 115 66 96
SDN 2135 5554 673 1429 628 .206 243 35 123 138 59 2111 .309 .288 .633 117 48 79
SFN 2304 5573 719 1459 681 .185 221 35 152 109 56 2206 .319 .273 .641 83 45 76
SLN 2223 5462 599 1398 554 .195 255 41 73 221 74 1954 .317 .278 .648 101 50 77

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ATL 508 65 97 1428 938 579 6303 1527 128 145.230 728 821 17 6 30 61 15
CHN 508 77 85 1442 877 572 6320 1510 121 100.560 695 774 13 4 42 62 14
CIN 478 91 71 1455 1029 543 6128 1338 124 71.970 549 597 14 5 50 48 26
HOU 510 75 87 1449 854 496 6143 1396 130 83.260 583 656 12 3 37 36 15
LAN 501 86 76 1441 1021 478 6082 1364 137 92.610 599 685 29 12 29 63 10
MON 503 85 77 1473 991 510 6173 1349 127 127.660 551 598 18 10 50 27 13
NYN 430 91 71 1441 1217 444 6009 1339 119 48.460 548 613 18 7 41 51 14
PHI 536 77 85 1449 840 651 6259 1381 124 119.330 659 729 18 6 35 69 15
PIT 526 95 67 1450 848 413 5997 1367 135 81.220 546 619 18 7 43 42 22
SDN 450 75 87 1462 928 507 6208 1437 147 72.220 598 673 21 9 35 39 19
SFN 497 85 77 1447 788 553 6235 1477 131 148.700 655 710 14 4 45 37 19
SLN 526 70 92 1442 833 475 6132 1432 98 93.560 622 698 8 5 39 45 5

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ATL 2555 7333 5385 1757 191 .960 17156 181 62 0 15
CHN 2669 7353 5430 1781 142 .972 17308 98 56 2.00 24
CIN 2540 7337 5487 1738 112 .963 17474 135 60 0 19
HOU 2761 7336 5537 1639 160 .961 17397 182 61 0 18
LAN 2751 7177 5384 1646 147 .957 17302 134 59 1.00 10
MON 2659 7365 5554 1684 127 .971 17679 194 45 0 21
NYN 2533 7046 5308 1593 145 .970 17277 201 71 0 20
PHI 2625 7386 5486 1766 134 .957 17391 104 56 1.00 8
PIT 2563 7423 5448 1810 165 .972 17368 135 68 1.00 9
SDN 2484 7428 5568 1702 158 .967 17543 132 60 0 9
SFN 2707 7457 5469 1857 131 .978 17355 147 53 0 11
SLN 2562 7439 5502 1771 166 .952 17315 144 76 0 11

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
Cincinnati Reds 91 71 2400892 1 1029
Los Angeles Dodgers 86 76 3002396 2 1021
San Francisco Giants 85 77 1975528 3 788
San Diego Padres 75 87 1856396 4 928
Houston Astros 75 87 1310927 4 854
Atlanta Braves 65 97 980129 6 938

Central

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
Pittsburg Pirates 95 67 2049908 1 848
New York Mets 91 71 2732745 2 1217
Montreal Expos 85 77 1373087 3 991
Chicago Cubs 77 85 2243791 4 877
Philadelphia Philies 77 85 1992484 4 840
St. Louis Cardinals 70 92 2573225 6 833

Awards

More From Around the Web

This day in baseball history

April 24

  • 1976

    On April 24, 1976, Bert Campaneris of the Oakland A’s stea ...

  • 1966

    On April 24, 1966, the Atlanta Braves establish a major leag ...

  • 1962

    On April 24, 1962, Sandy Koufax of the Los Angeles Dodgers s ...

More Baseball History
Tagged:
1990 NLCS, 1990 World Series, Andre Dawson, Barry Bonds, Barry Larkin, Billy Hatcher, Bo Diaz, Bobby Bonilla, Brett Butler, Chris Sabo, Cincinnati Reds, Danny Darwin, Darryl Strawberry, David Cone, David Justice, Doug Drabek, Eddie Murray, Eric Davis, Fernando Valenzuela, Frank Viola, Jose Rijo, Kevin Mitchell, Matt Williams, Pittsburgh Pirates, Randy Myers, Rob Dibble, Ryne Sandberg, Terry Mulholland, Tom Browning, Vince Coleman, Whitey Herzog, Willie McGee

Comments

    Be respectful, keep it clean.
Login or register to post comments

Share US

Share |