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Central Division

East Division

Series Wrapup

Story

The 2010 National League season witnessed the Cincinnati Reds capture their first division title in 15 years, the continued domination of the Philadelphia Phillies in the East, and the surprising rise to the top of the baseball world by the pitching-rich San Francisco Giants.

After finishing fourth in the N.L. Central the previous year with a record of 78-84, the Cincinnati Reds claimed their first division title since 1995 by compiling a record of 91-71 that placed them five games ahead of the runner-up St. Louis Cardinals in the final standings.  Cincinnati’s first-place finish coincided with the emergence of 26-year-old first baseman Joey Votto as one of the senior circuit’s most dynamic hitters.  Votto placed among the league-leaders with 37 home runs, 113 runs batted in, 106 runs scored, and a .324 batting average, and he topped the circuit with a .424 on-base percentage and a .600 slugging average.  Votto’s outstanding play earned him N.L. MVP honors.

Although the Cardinals failed to earn a return-trip to the postseason, they received another exceptional performance from Albert Pujols.  The slugging first baseman batted .312 and led the league with 42 homers, 118 runs batted in, and 115 runs scored, en route to earning a second-place finish to Votto in the MVP balloting.

While the Reds won their division for the first time in 15 years, the Philadelphia Phillies claimed the N.L. East title for the fourth consecutive time.  The Phillies finished the regular season with a league-best record of 97-65, six games ahead of the runner-up Atlanta Braves, who advanced to the playoffs as the senior circuit’s wild-card entry.  

Clearly the National League’s strongest team over the course of the regular season, the Phillies boasted one of the circuit’s top offenses and a solid pitching staff that included the league’s best pitcher.  In his first year in the senior circuit, Roy Halladay won the Cy Young Award by compiling a 2.44 ERA, striking out 219 batters, and leading all N.L. hurlers with 21 wins, nine complete games, four shutouts, and 251 innings pitched.  Cole Hamels also pitched effectively for the Phillies, finishing second on the club with 12 wins, a 3.06 ERA, 211 strikeouts, and 209 innings pitched.  Roy Oswalt gave Philadelphia a third solid starter after he joined the team during the season’s second half, going 7-1 with a 1.74 ERA in his 12 starts.

Still, the Phillies’ greatest strength remained their offense, which finished second in the league with 772 runs scored.  Although Ryan Howard and Chase Utley both experienced slightly subpar seasons, they managed to post fairly impressive numbers.  Howard finished the year with 31 homers, 108 runs batted in, and a .276 batting average.  Utley batted .275, hit 16 homers, and scored 75 times, in only 115 games.  Shane Victorino and Jayson Werth joined Howard and Utley as the team’s top offensive threats.  Victorino hit 18 homers, scored 84 runs, and stole 34 bases.  Werth batted .296, finished second on the club with 27 home runs and 85 runs batted in, and led the team with 106 runs scored.

The National League’s most surprising team ended up being the San Francisco Giants, who finished the year strong to edge out the San Diego Padres for the Western Division title by two games.  The Giants concluded the campaign with a record of 92-70, two games ahead of the Padres, and nine games in front of the third-place Colorado Rockies, who featured three of the league’s top performers.  Ubaldo Jimenez placed among the league leaders with a record of 19-8, a 2.88 ERA, and 214 strikeouts.  Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki batted .315, hit 27 homers, and drove in 95 runs.  In just his first full season, outfielder Carlos Gonzalez established himself as one of the senior circuit’s finest all-around players by hitting 34 home runs, knocking in 117 runs, scoring 111 others, stealing 26 bases, and leading the league with a .336 batting average, 197 hits, and 351 total bases.

However, the Giants’ superior pitching made them the division’s strongest team.  Although the Giants finished just ninth in the league in runs scored, they posted a team ERA of 3.36 that placed them first in the league rankings.  Tim Lincecum remained the staff ace, leading the team with 16 victories and 231 strikeouts.  Matt Cain and Jonathan Sanchez joined Lincecum to give the Giants a formidable “Big Three” at the top of their starting rotation.  Cain won 13 games, compiled a 3.14 ERA, struck out 177 batters, and led the team with four complete games and 223 innings pitched.  Sanchez also posted 13 victories, and he struck out 205 batters and led the starters with a 3.07 ERA.  Brian Wilson anchored San Francisco’s bullpen, leading the league with 48 saves, compiling a 1.81 ERA, and striking out 93 batters in 75 innings of work.

Veteran first baseman Aubrey Huff and N.L. Rookie of the Year catcher Buster Posey paced San Francisco’s rather mediocre offense.  Huff batted .290 and led the club with 26 home runs, 86 runs batted in, and 100 runs scored.  Posey batted .305, hit 18 homers, and drove in 67 runs, in only
108 games.

The Giants used their outstanding pitching to defeat the Braves in four games in their NLDS matchup, posting all three of their victories by a single run, compiling a team ERA of 1.66, and holding Atlanta to a team batting average of just .175.  Meanwhile, the Phillies dominated Cincinnati in the other Division Series, sweeping the Reds in three straight games and outscoring them by a combined margin of 13-4.  Game One of the Series featured just the second no-hitter in postseason history, as Roy Halladay allowed only one walk during a 4-0 Philadelphia victory.  

After rolling over Cincinnati, the Phillies entered their NLCS matchup with the Giants fully expecting to emerge victorious and subsequently represent the senior circuit in the World Series for the third straight year.  However, San Francisco stunned Philadelphia in six games, with newly-acquired utility outfielder Cody Ross earning NLCS MVP honors by batting .350, hitting three homers, and driving in five runs.

The Giants continued their roll against the Texas Rangers in the World Series, defeating their American League counterparts in five games.  After relying heavily on their outstanding pitching staff throughout the year, the Giants broke out the heavy lumber in the first two contests, scoring a total of 20 runs, to grab a 2-0 lead in the Fall Classic.  The Rangers took Game Three, but the Giants returned to their familiar formula to post 4-0 and 3-1 wins in the final two contests.  Along the way, they defeated Cliff Lee twice, bringing to an end the ace left-hander’s postseason dominance.  After being injured most of the year, Giants shortstop Edgar Renteria earned Series MVP honors by batting .412, hitting two homers, driving in six runs, and scoring six others.

Other outstanding performers, notable events, and points of interest from around the league follow:

• January 4 – Randy Johnson announced his retirement.  He ended his career with 303 wins and second only to Nolan Ryan on the all-time strikeouts list.

• February 11 - Tom Glavine moved into the front office of the Atlanta Braves after 22 seasons and 305 victories.

• April 17 - Colorado’s Ubaldo Jimenez threw a 4-0 no-hitter against the Atlanta Braves.

• May 29 – Philadelphia’s Roy Halladay threw the 20th perfect game in major league history – a 1-0 win over the Florida Marlins.

• September 8 - Milwaukee’s Trevor Hoffman became the first pitcher to record 600 saves.

• October 6 – Roy Halladay threw the second no-hitter in postseason history in Game One of Philadelphia’s Division Series against the Cincinnati Reds.  The Phillies won Halladay’s first postseason start by a score of 4-0, with the ace right-hander allowing only one base on balls.

• The National League earned home-field advantage in the World Series by defeating the American League 3-1 in the All-Star Game.  Atlanta catcher Brian McCann earned game MVP honors by hitting a three-run double with two outs in the seventh inning for the senior circuit’s only runs.

• Bobby Cox retired as manager of the Braves following the team’s four-game loss to the Giants in the NLDS.  He ended his managerial career with 2,504 wins, placing him fourth on the all-time list.

• Joe Torre retired as skipper of the Dodgers, turning over the managerial reins to longtime apprentice Don Mattingly.  Torre’s teams made the playoffs in 13 of his final 15 seasons as manager, including 11 in a row with the Yankees from 1996 to 2006.

• Lou Piniella retired as manager of the Cubs, leaving the game after almost 50 years as a player and manager to care for his ailing mother.

• By finishing the season with 42 home runs, Albert Pujols became the first player in major league history to surpass the 30-homer mark in each of his first 10 seasons.

Seasons of the National League

1876 · 1877 · 1878 · 1879 · 1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 · 1884 · 1885 · 1886 · 1887 · 1888 · 1889 · 1890 · 1891 · 1892 · 1893 · 1894 · 1895 · 1896 · 1897 · 1898 · 1899 · 1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904 · 1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909 · 1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914 · 1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919 · 1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924 · 1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929 · 1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934 · 1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939 · 1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944 · 1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949 · 1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954 · 1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959 · 1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964 · 1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969 · 1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979 · 1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984 · 1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989 · 1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994 · 1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999 · 2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004 · 2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009 · 2010  

Batting

TM G AB R H RBI AVG 2B 3B HR SB CS TB OBP SLG OPSLG GIDP SF SH
ARI 2271 5473 713 1366 691 .185 301 34 180 86 41 2275 .325 .276 .657 113 41 41
ATL 2376 5463 738 1411 699 .173 312 25 139 63 29 2190 .344 .273 .662 136 35 69
CHN 2307 5512 685 1414 658 .183 298 27 149 55 31 2213 .325 .265 .635 124 38 60
CIN 2370 5579 790 1515 761 .213 293 30 188 93 43 2432 .323 .337 .726 113 50 66
COL 2379 5530 770 1452 741 .213 270 54 173 99 42 2349 .344 .310 .695 103 47 56
FLO 2299 5531 719 1403 686 .181 294 37 152 92 26 2227 .302 .270 .620 107 43 51
HOU 2357 5452 611 1348 577 .195 252 25 108 100 36 1974 .311 .338 .715 130 29 75
LAN 2309 5426 667 1368 621 .181 270 29 120 92 50 2056 .357 .247 .632 123 50 85
MIL 2262 5606 750 1471 710 .198 293 33 182 81 26 2376 .339 .282 .705 115 35 35
NYN 2348 5465 656 1361 625 .199 266 40 128 130 44 2091 .296 .285 .605 101 57 74
PHI 2277 5581 772 1451 736 .184 290 34 166 108 21 2307 .316 .295 .675 120 43 44
PIT 2327 5386 587 1303 570 .187 276 27 126 87 36 2011 .298 .264 .608 119 33 58
SDN 2352 5434 665 1338 630 .180 236 24 132 124 50 2018 .312 .262 .624 106 46 79
SFN 2354 5488 697 1411 660 .212 284 30 162 55 32 2241 .334 .295 .690 158 41 76
SLN 2347 5542 736 1456 689 .200 285 18 150 79 41 2227 .309 .303 .659 124 40 66
WAS 2409 5418 655 1355 634 .182 250 31 149 110 41 2114 .281 .260 .591 125 47 71

Pitching

Team G W L IP SO BB BF H HR ERA ER R GC SH SV WP BK
ARI 616 65 97 1433 1070 548 6260 1503 210 178.260 765 836 3 1 35 82 4
ATL 652 91 71 1441 1241 505 6052 1326 126 115.860 571 629 2 0 41 42 3
CHN 644 75 87 1437 1268 605 6298 1409 154 126.610 677 767 1 0 40 46 6
CIN 663 91 71 1455 1130 524 6182 1404 158 89.880 649 685 4 2 43 48 6
COL 675 83 79 1441 1234 525 6143 1405 139 96.700 663 717 6 2 35 77 12
FLO 643 80 82 1440 1168 549 6217 1433 134 223.140 654 717 5 2 39 49 4
HOU 669 76 86 1439 1210 548 6221 1446 140 167.210 654 729 4 2 45 57 9
LAN 636 80 82 1441 1274 539 6141 1323 134 144.640 643 692 4 4 41 58 8
MIL 657 77 85 1438 1258 582 6324 1487 173 130.610 734 804 3 3 35 71 3
NYN 653 79 83 1453 1106 545 6245 1438 135 80.170 602 652 8 4 36 48 5
PHI 613 97 65 1460 1183 416 6095 1402 168 142.770 596 640 14 6 40 26 5
PIT 679 57 105 1413 1026 538 6300 1567 167 197.670 785 866 1 1 31 56 10
SDN 661 90 72 1458 1295 517 6058 1305 139 73.350 551 581 2 2 49 29 5
SFN 638 92 70 1461 1331 578 6159 1279 134 71.620 546 583 6 3 57 74 4
SLN 617 86 76 1452 1094 477 6137 1412 133 92.760 577 641 7 3 32 42 4
WAS 656 69 93 1436 1068 512 6214 1469 151 124.920 659 742 2 1 37 33 7

Fielding

Team ID G TC PO A E Fld% InOuts SB CS CS% PB
ARI 2617 1598 121 0 17186 115 36 0 15
ATL 2766 1791 145 0 17274 102 44 0 6
CHN 2701 1572 144 0 17240 114 31 0 6
CIN 2780 1633 86 0 17438 71 34 0 4
COL 2774 1725 113 0 17303 81 43 0 15
FLO 2625 1538 141 0 17262 111 44 0 11
HOU 2696 1621 118 0 17271 89 44 0 12
LAN 2685 1606 114 0 17300 97 39 0 6
MIL 2609 1545 115 0 17268 100 31 0 5
NYN 2669 1699 96 0 17438 51 26 0 10
PHI 2569 1714 93 0 17478 84 31 0 6
PIT 2643 1685 142 0 16942 116 32 0 11
SDN 2772 1650 85 0 17478 79 39 0 13
SFN 2866 1518 80 0 17531 115 49 0 6
SLN 2806 1894 109 0 17442 53 38 0 10
WAS 2889 1682 142 0 17216 79 35 0 5

West

team W L Att Rk SOP
San Francisco Giants 92 70 1 1331
San Diego Padres 90 72 2 1295
Colorado Rockies 83 79 3 1234
Los Angeles Dodgers 80 82 4 1274
Arizona Diamondbacks 65 97 5 1070

Central

team W L Att Rk SOP
Cincinnati Reds 91 71 1 1130
St. Louis Cardinals 86 76 2 1094
Milwaukee Brewers 77 85 3 1258
Houston Astros 76 86 4 1210
Chicago Cubs 75 87 5 1268
Pittsburg Pirates 57 105 6 1026

East

team W L Att Rk SOP
Philadelphia Philies 97 65 1 1183
Atlanta Braves 91 71 2 1241
Florida Marlins 80 82 3 1168
New York Mets 79 83 4 1106
Washington Nationals 69 93 5 1068

Awards

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Tagged:
2010 NLCS, 2010 NLDS1, 2010 NLDS2, 2010 World Series, Albert Pujols, Aubrey Huff, Bobby Cox, Brian McCann, Brian Wilson, Buster Posey, Carlos Gonzalez, Chase Utley, Cody Ross, Cole Hamels, Edgar Renteria, Jayson Werth, Joe Torre, Joey Votto, Jonathan Sanchez, Lou Piniella, Matt Cain, Philadelphia Phillies, Randy Johnson, Roy Halladay, Roy Oswalt, Ryan Howard, San Francisco Giants, Shane Victorino, Tim Lincecum, Tom Glavine, Trevor Hoffman, Troy Tulowitzki, Ubaldo Jimenez

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