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In the 1914 World Series, the Boston Braves beat the Philadelphia Athletics in a four-game sweep.

A contender for greatest upset of all time, the "Miracle Braves" were in last place on July 4, then roared on to win the National League pennant by 10 1⁄2 games and sweep the stunned Athletics. The Braves' relatively unknown starting trio of pitchers, with a combined career record of 285–245, outperformed the Athletics vaunted rotation (929–654) in all four games. Hank Gowdy hit .545 (6 of 11) with five extra-base hits and also drew five walks for Boston in the series and was the difference maker in Games 1 and 3.

Adding to their supposed disadvantages, the Braves arguably lacked a notable home-field advantage. They had abandoned their 43-year-old home field South End Grounds in August 1914, choosing to rent from the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park while awaiting construction of Braves Field (1915). Thus their home games in this Series were also at Fenway.

This was the first four-game sweep in World Series history. The Cubs had defeated the Tigers four games to none in 1907, but Game 1 had ended in a tie before the Cubs won the next four in a row.

In some circles, it was alleged that the A's were irritated at the penny-pinching ways of their manager/owner Connie Mack, and did not play hard. Chief Bender and Eddie Plank would jump to the rival Federal League for the 1915 season. Mack unloaded most of his other high-priced stars soon after and, within two years, the A's achieved the worst winning percentage in modern history (even worse than the 1962 New York Mets or the 2003 Detroit Tigers).

Records

Boston Braves, 94-59
Philadelphia Athletics, 99-53

Managers

Boston Braves, George Stallings
Philadelphia Athletics, Connie Mack

Umpires

Bill Dinneen (AL), Bill Klem (NL), George Hildebrand (AL), Bill Byron (NL)

Hall of Famers

Braves: Johnny Evers, Rabbit Maranville. Athletics: Connie Mack (mgr.), Frank Baker, Chief Bender, Eddie Collins, Herb Pennock, Eddie Plank.

By WIKI
 

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Tagged:
1914 World Series, Boston Braves, Boston Red Sox, Braves Field, Chicago Cubs, Chief Bender, Connie Mack, Detroit Tigers, Eddie Collins, Eddie Plank, Federal League, Fenway Park, Frank Baker, Hank Gowdy, Herb Pennock, Johnny Evers, New York Mets, Philadelphia Athletics, Rabbit Maranville, Shibe Park

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